Skip to main content

Full text of "Announcement"

See other formats


L I B RARY 

OF THE 

U N IVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 


J62«Z% 

191/ -34 






THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



This volume is bound without 



which is/a*© unavailable. 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

Advance Sheets from Number 3 

March, 1911 



3-AJW^Cv? 

°)\\ 



THE 



JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 






ANNOUNCEMENT OF 

FIRST SUMMER SESSION 

July 5 to August 16 
1911 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

Advance Sheets from Number 3 

March, 1911 



CALENDAR, 1911 
June 13, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



July 1, Saturday — ) 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Registration at the office 

July 3, Monday — f of the Registrar, McCoy Hall. 

July 5, Wednesday — Instruction in all courses in the First Sum- 
mer Session begins. 

August 15, Tuesday — Courses of Instruction close. 

August 16, Wednesday — Examinations and close of Summer Ses- 
sion. 



October 3, Tuesday — Thirty-sixth regular session begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Wednesday morning, July 5. 
It is important that students should reach Baltimore in time to 
be present at the opening exercises in each class. Registration 
may be made by mail prior to July 1. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF 

FIRST SUMMER SESSION 

July $ to August 16 
1911 



Digitized "by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/announcement19111922john 



2u. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
SUMMER SESSION 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
1911 

Ira Remsen, Ph. D., LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward Franklin Buchner, Ph. D. 

Professor of Education and Philosophy 

Director of the Summer Session 

Thomas R. Ball 
Registrar 

INSTRUCTORS 
Ronald T. Abercrombie School Hygiene 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1901, and M. D., 1905; Director of the 
Gymnasium. 

John A. Anderson Physics 

S. B., Valparaiso College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1906-07, 
and Ph. D., 1907; Associate in Astronomy. 

Edwakd F. Buchner Education 

A. B., LeaDder Clark College, 1889, and A. M., 1892; Ph. D., Yale University, 
1893, and Lecturer and Instructor in Philosophy and Pedagogy, 1S92-97 ; 
Professor of Analytical Psychology, New York University, 1896-01 ; Docent, 
Clark University, 1901-03 ; Professor of Philosophy and Education, University 
of Alabama, 1903-08 ; Professor of Education and Philosophy. 

William Paxton Burris Education 

Ph. B., DePauw University, 1891, and A. M., 1894; A. M., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1901 ; Superintendent of Public Schools, Bluffton, Indiana, 1891-97 ; 
Superintendent of Public Schools, Salem, Ohio, 1897-1900 ; Scholar in 
Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1901-02 ; elected Fellow ibid, in 1903 ; 
Principal. Teachers' Training School, Albany, N. Y., 1902-05 ; Professor of 
the History and Philosophy of Education, and Dean of the College for 
Teachers, University of Cincinnati. 

John C. French English 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1899, Fellow, 1903-04, and Ph. D., 1905; 
Associate in English. 

Hans Froelicher German 

Ph. D., University of Zurich, 1886; Professor of the German Language and 
Literature and of Art Criticism, Goucher College. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Instructor in Carpentry and Woodcarving, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute ; 
Supervisor of Manual Training Centres, Baltimore Public Schools ; Supervisor 
of Boys' Industrial Work in Vacation Schools, New York City, 1904-08. 



6 College Courses for Teachers 

J. Elliott Gilpin Chemistry 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1889, and Ph. D., 1892; Associate in 
Chemistry. 

Agnes Ellen Harris Domestic Science 

Oread Institute, 1901 ; Georgia Normal and Industrial College, 1902 ; Teachers' 
College, Columbia University, 1910-11; Director, Department of Home 
Economics, Florida State College for Women. 

Clifton F. Hodge Biology 

A. B., Ripon College, 1892 ; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1888-89, and 
Ph. D., 1889; Instructor in Biology, University of Wisconsin, 1891-92; As- 
sista it Professor of Physiology and Neurology, Clark University, 1892-06, 
and Professor, 1906 — ; Professor of Biology, Clark College. 

Lorrain S. Hulburt Mathematics 

A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1883, and A. M., 1888; Professor of Mathe- 
matics, University of South Dakota, 1887-91 ; Fellow, Clark University, 
1S91-92; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1894; Collegiate Professor of 
Mathematics, 

Frank A. Manny Education 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1893, A. M., 1896; studied graduate schools, 
University of Chicago, Columbia University, and European schools, 1906-07 ; 
Principal, High School, Moline, 111., 1894-96; Assistant in Pedagogy, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1896-97 ; Supervisor of Public Schools, Indianapolis. 
1897-98 ; Head Educational Department, State Normal School, Oshkosh, Wis., 
1898-1900: Superintendent, Ethical Culture Schools, New York, 1900-06; 
Head of Educational and Extension Departments, Western State Normal 
School, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Wilfred P. Mustard Latin 

A. B., University of Toronto, 1886, A. M., 1890, and Fellow, University Col- 
lege, 1886-89; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1890-91, and Ph. D., 1891; 
American School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1902-03 ; Professor of Latin 
in Colorado College, 1891-93 ; Instructor in Haverford College, 1893-94, and 
Professor of Latin, 1894-1907 ; Collegiate Professor of Latin. 

Joseph S. Shefloe French 

A. B., Luther College, 1885, and A. M., 1889; University Scholar and Fel- 
low, Johns Hopkins University, 1888-90, Ph. D., 1890, and Fellow by 
Courtesy, 1890-91 ; Professor of Romanic Languages, Goucher College. 

St. George L. Sioussat History 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1896, and Ph. D., 1899; Instructor, Smith 
College, 1899-04 ; Professor of History, University of the South. 

Henry S. West English 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1893, Fellow, 1898-99, Ph. D., 1899, and 
Instructor in EngMsb, 1899-00 ; Professor of English, Baltimore City Col- 
lege, 1894-97 and 1900; Principal, Western High School, Baltimore, 1900-06; 
Assistant to the Superintendent of Schools, Baltimore. 



General Statement 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The first summer session of the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity will open on Wednesday, July 5, and continue until 
Wednesday, August 16, inclusive. Exercises in each sub- 
ject will be held every week-day except Saturday. Each 
course will consist of thirty class exercises, or their 
equivalent in laboratory work. Each course of instruc- 
tion will conclude with an examination, to be given on the 
last day of the summer session. 

As the summer session is authorized by the Trustees, 
and its credits accepted by the Board of Collegiate Stud- 
ies, it is an integral part of the work of the University. 
All the resources of the institution essential to the con- 
duct of the summer session are placed at the disposal of 
the students. These resources include the use not only of 
the academic buildings, but also of the general and de- 
partmental libraries, laboratories, and gymnasium. 

The principal object of the University in making pro- 
vision for a summer session is to furnish instruction to 
teachers in all grades of schools, and to other persons who 
seek opportunities for instruction, with or without refer- 
ence to an academic degree. Some courses offered are 
designed to meet the needs of matriculated students who 
wish to advance their standing or to make up deficiencies ; 
others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in 
part the entrance requirements. 

No opportunity for graduate instruction is offered in 
the first summer session. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses of instruction, with but few exceptions, are 
collegiate courses, and the same standard is maintained 



8 College Courses for Teachers 

as in the courses of the regular session. In addition to 
the regular class exercises, each instructor holds a daily 
conference, in which the work of his course is supple- 
mented and adapted to the particular needs of individuals. 

SCHOOL OF OBSERVATION 

It is expected that an elementary school will be in oper- 
ation and available for observation in connection with the 
courses in education, thus affording opportunity to super- 
intendents, principals, supervisors and critic teachers to 
consider concrete problems in elementary instruction. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

For the satisfactory completion of any course of colle- 
giate grade in the summer session, a credit of one-third 
of a regular college course will be allowed to matriculated 
students, or candidates for matriculation, in this Univer- 
sity. Not more than two courses may be offered for 
credit in one summer session. 

Students in the summer session not matriculated in the 
University may receive certificates of attendance and 
satisfactory work done. 

Of the courses announced below, the following are of 
collegiate grade: Biology 1 and 2, Chemistry 1 and 2, 
English Composition 1 and 2, English Literature 1 and 2, 
French 2, German 2, History 2, Mathematics 2. The 
amount of credit allowed for Chemistry 3 is one-fourth 
of a regular college course. 

The following courses are of secondary grade : French 1, 
German 1, History 1, Latin 1 and 2, Mathematics 1, and 
Physics 1 and 2. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission to the 
summer session. Students, both men and women, will be 



General Statement 9 

admitted to such . courses as they are found qualified by 
the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The summer session will open promptly on July 5, car- 
rying out the schedule provided on page 23. Students 
are advised to register in advance of the opening. 

The Kegistrar's office (McCoy Hall, first floor) will be 
open for registration of students on Saturday, July 1, 
Monday, July 3, and Wednesday, July 5, from 9 a. m. to 
5 p. m. Students should register without delay. After 
July 7, admission to each course will be restricted to reg- 
istered students. After July 10, no change of courses will 
be allowed. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately after 
registration. 

LOCATION 

The summer session will be held in the University build- 
ings, which are situated on Monument street and Druid 
Hill avenue between Howard and Eutaw streets. 

The instruction in Manual Training and Domestic 
Science will be given in Public School No. 79, Park ave- 
nue and Hoffman street. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. Under very 
exceptional circumstances, a student may register in one 
course only. The tuition fee in such cases will be $15.00. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some 
of the courses. (For details, see statement of courses.) 
No reduction of fee will be allowed for late entrance, or 
for withdrawal, except on account of illness or other se- 
rious and unavoidable causes. 



10 College Courses for Teachers 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable fur- 
nished rooms in private homes in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity are offered for rent at prices ranging from f 1.50 to 
$3.00 per week for a single room, and $3.00 to $7.00 a 
week for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private 
boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging 
from $3.50 to $5.00 per week. A printed list of boarding 
and lodging houses will be sent upon request. 

UNIVERSITY POST-OFF ICE 

The University post-office in McCoy Hall will be open 
during the summer session. Students may have their 
mail addressed to them in care of the Johns Hopkins 
University. 

SPECIAL RAILROAD RATES 

Application has been made for reduced railroad rates 
for students in attendance at the summer session. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 

The chief aim of the courses in biology, especially de- 
signed for teachers in the grades and for teachers in 
academies and high schools, will be to develop a point of 
view which shall give a teacher ability, wherever placed, 
to organize the important elements in the natural environ- 
ment of his school into a course which shall be of vital 
human interest to his pupils. Both courses will consist 
of round-table discussions and lectures, as informal as 
possible, each one hour daily, supplemented by laboratory 
exercises. These latter will consist of out-of-door prob- 
lem-solving, observation, acquaintance and study of things 
alive and at work in their normal environment. A good 
deal of this work may be done excursion- wise, if size of 
classes and hours permit. 

1. Naturb Study op Animals and Plants. Professor 

Hodge. Biological Laboratory. 

The center of interest in this course is the vital needs of the 
child in the home, the things in the natural environment of the 
home the knowledge of which will stimulate most normal growth 
and highest enjoyment of the common home life. First comes 
conservation of health of child and home, then relations of chil- 
dren to animal life, proper care of pets and acquaintance with 
the wild life of the neighborhood; then children's gardens, the 
rearing of flowers and vegetables, elementary agriculture and 
especially horticulture. This will lead naturally to acquaintance 
with insects and birds and the common garden fungi. Shore, 
fresh-water and marine life will also furnish capital material for 
nature lessons in the neighborhood of Baltimore. 

Text-book: Hodge's Nature Study and Life (Ginn & Co.). 

2. Civic Biology. Professor Hodge. Biological Labo- 

ratory. 

The focus of interest here shifts to the needs of the community. 
Public sanitation now takes the place of home hygiene, and civic 

11 



12 College Courses for Teachers 

improvement and conservation of community, and national re- 
sources of home industry. The course will attempt to answer 
the question: What does a town, city or state require efficient 
citizens to know concerning the forces of living nature? This, it 
is believed, will offer a solution of the problems of high school 
biology which shall not encroach upon the college course and still 
supply a much needed preparation for it, and, as well, for the 
duties of active citizenship. 

CHEMISTEY 

1. Introduction to General Chemistry. Dr. Gilpin. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. 
It will include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of 
the more important non-metallic and metallic elements and their 
properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer Course) will be used as 
a basis for the class room and laboratory work. 

Special emphasis will be laid on the laboratory work, and the 
student will be encouraged to attain such familiarity with some 
of the more important chemical substances and their behavior 
and with methods of laboratory practice as can only be secured by 
personal conference and experimentation in the laboratory. 

Laboratory work, 15 hours weekly. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry, with Special Reference to 

Qualitative Analysis. Dr. Gilpin. Chemical 
Laboratory. 

This course will consist of three lectures each week on the 
principles of qualitative analysis and a discussion of the physical- 
chemical laws upon which the practices of qualitative analysis 
are based. Alexander Smith's General Inorganic Chemistry will 
be used as a text. 

The student will be trained in the methods of qualitative analy- 
sis by means of a variety of mixtures, natural minerals and ores, 
to be supplemented by explanations of the chemical principles 
and reactions involved. 

Laboratory work, 16-18 hours a week. 

3. Laboratory Work in Inorganic or Organic Prepa- 

rations. Dr. Gilpin. Chemical Laboratory. 
This course may be followed by persons who have had the 
necessary preliminary chemical training. It will consist of labor- 



Courses Offered 13 

atory work, fifteen hours weekly, based on Remsen's Organic 
Chemistry, and such outside reading as may be deemed advisable 
by the instructor. 

Laboratory Fees: $8.00 for each course, if taken along with 
other subjects; $10.00, if all the student's time is given to Chem- 
istry. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1. Foods and Cookery. Miss Harris. Public School 

No. 79. 

Demonstrations, lectures and laboratory work. 

This course includes: Laboratory practice in the fundamental 
cooking processes, together with lectures and demonstrations, 
with reference to the principles of chemistry and physics that 
underlie food preparation; a consideration of the comparative 
costs and nutritive values of food materials. 

Students in this course who expect to become Domestic Science 
teachers are advised to take Chemistry 1 as a parallel course. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

2. Domestic Science Teaching. Miss Harris. Public 

School No. 79. 
This course considers methods of presenting Domestic Science 
in Elementary and Secondary Schools. It includes a study of 
Laboratory Equipment and Management, with a consideration of 
marketing for School Laboratories. Courses of study are dis- 
cussed, together with planning and presentation of lessons. 
Course 1, or its equivalent, prerequisite or parallel. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 

EDUCATION 

1. Education in Modern Times. Professor Burris. 
McCoy Hall. 
An interpretation of educational practice, ideals, and tenden- 
cies, particularly in American public schools, is undertaken. As 
a historical background for this course, there will be lectures cov- 
ering the period since the beginning of the seventeenth century, 
in sketch, with special attention to those influences — political, 
religious, philosophical, scientific, industrial — which have been 
most powerful in shaping popular education as we find it at the 
present time. 



14 College Courses for Teachers 

Supplementary to the lectures, parallel reading will cover the 
work of men who prepare the way for educational advance. In 
this manner students will extend their understanding of the 
essential contributions of Bacon, Comenius, Locke, Rousseau, 
Pestalozzi, Herbart, Froebel, Mann, Spencer, Harris, Hall, and 
Dewey. 

The worth of the educational principles formulated by these 
men will be considered with reference to the needs of the indi- 
vidual, as such, on the one hand, and to him in his relations in 
society, on the other. In view of the very practical purpose of 
the course in promoting professional improvement of teachers, it 
will conclude with statements of some of the most pressing educa- 
tional problems in our day, and with some suggestions as to the 
direction in which we must seek help in solving them. 

Text-books: Monroe's Briefer Course in the History of Educa- 
tion and Henderson's Text-book in the Principles of Education. 
(Both the Macmillan Co.) 

2. Educational Psychology. Professor Buchner. 

McCoy Hall. 
This course of lectures, discussions and required readings is 
designed to provide opportunity for the study of the principles of 
general psychology in their application to education and teaching, 
the chief feature of mental development in childhood and youth, 
and the special psychology of the more common school subjects 
and activities. The scope of the work will be determined in 
accordance with the knowledge of psychology possessed by the 
students. 

3. Organization and Administration of Schools. Pro- 

fessor Manny. Levering Hall. 

The organization and administration of schools have definite 
relations to a number of special fields. While the course has 
greatest significance for students who are directly concerned with 
executive work, or who are looking to the attainment of such posi- 
tions, it is prepared also with reference to the needs of several 
classes, among which are (1) members of school boards or com- 
mittees; (2) teachers who wish to see their particular work in 
larger relations; (3) those interested in other forms of social 
service who are brought into touch with educational problems. 

The central idea of the course will be the movement toward 
increased efficiency and greater economy in the school. This will 
be studied in relation to the municipality and the district (com- 
mission form of government) ; school persons (expert require- 
ments, from board members to janitors) ; experimentation (con- 



Courses Offered 15 

tinuation schools, open air schools, Chicago course) ; division of 
labor between elementary, secondary and higher schools; curricu- 
lum; hygiene; reports; records and accounts; grading and pro- 
motion; special schools; pupils' and teachers' organization. 

Each student will be expected to choose for special study cer- 
tain definite topics, in which he can gain considerable control of 
the problems and their material. 

Students interested in the course are invited to send communi- 
cations to the Instructor in advance with reference to special 
topics and preparatory reading. 

Text-book: Chancellor's "Our Schools, Their Administration 
and Supervision " (Heath & Co.), or Dutton & Snedden's "Admin- 
istration of Public Education in the United States" (the Mac- 
millan Co.). 

4. Principles and Problems of Secondary Education. 
Professor Burris. McCoy Hall. 

The purpose, means, methods, and management of secondary 
schools considered as an integral part of the American system of 
education. 

Historical sketch of the growth of secondary education in the 
United States — Conflicting demands which have retarded the defi- 
nition of an unique function for this type of school — Comparison 
with foreign secondary schools — The election of studies vs. the 
election of schools. 

Ideals and tendencies of the American secondary school con- 
sidered as a phase of individual and social development during 
the adolescent period — Its relation to other types of school, lower 
and higher — Differences in motive, studies, methods and organiza- 
tion. 

What are secondary studies — Basis for choosing in the past — 
How the selection is influenced by recent changes in general 
educational theory — Organization of studies into curricula. 

To what extent is there a general method of teaching appli- 
cable to secondary studies — Special methods as determined by 
" the law of the mind and the thought in the thing " — Relative 
worth of culture, discipline, pleasure and value as motives — The 
teacher's professional preparation and equipment. 

Problems involved in the discipline and social life of the sec- 
ondary school — The question of self-government — Coeducation vs. 
segregation — Prescription vs. election — Athletics and student 
organizations — Examinations, promotion and graduation. 



16 College Courses for Teachers 

5. The Elementary School. Professor Manny. Lev- 

ering Hall. 

In this course there will be an attempt to differentiate the dis- 
tinctive work of the school in the periods before adolescence. The 
major portion of the time will be given to immediate problems 
of the course of study and the machinery of grading, promo- 
tion, individual and class instruction, supervision. The aim 
will be to carry method and subject-matter back to the motives 
and needs calling for them. These can best be studied on the one 
hand in the interests, activities and occupations of the pupils, 
and on the other in the changing social conditions which call for 
varied emphasis in control. 

While limited time will prevent giving much attention to the 
historical development of elementary education, each student will 
be expected to keep in mind the matter of background for the 
problems he studies, and to bring to them whatever material he 
has worked upon which has bearing upon them. 

Critical studies will be made of the literature of the subject 
as found in periodicals, books, reports, courses of study, extra- 
school movements as the Boy Scouts. Each student will do at 
least a small amount of constructive curriculum work. 

Anyone interested in the work of this course is invited to 
write to the instructor if he wishes aid in planning for special 
problems and material in advance. 

6. School Hygiene. Dr. Abercrombie. McCoy Hall. 
A course designed for the elementary school-teacher to enable 

him to understand the general principles of Hygiene and its prac- 
tical bearing on the educational and personal interests of the 
children who come under his care, and to give him an opportunity 
of acquiring such information as may assist in protecting and 
improving the health of the school children, and in a degree to 
show how to detect some diseases likely to be met with in the 
school. 

The principal topics are as follows: 

The Body as a whole — Its Anatomy and Physiology — The skele- 
ton, the muscles, the vital organs, growth and waste, fatigue, 
relaxation. Digestion — Circulation, secretions, excretions, body 
heat, nutrition, special senses, the nerves. 

Hygiene, Personal — Care of the body, health and disease, ac- 
tivity, development, deformities and corrections, feeding, stimu- 
lants, care of special parts, clothing, bathing. 



Courses Offered 17 

Hygiene, School — Building, position, size, material, rooms, lava- 
tories, ventilation, warming, lighting, sanitation, cleaning, water 
supply, drainage, garbage, rubbish, furniture. 

Infection and communicable diseases. 

Medical inspection of schools — The teacher's part. 

Text-book: Hough & Sedgwick's "The Human Mechanism" 
(Ginn & Co.). 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Introductory Course in Diction and Structure. 

Dr. French. McCoy Hall. 

The work of this course will include the study, by means of 
text-book and lectures, of the principles of rhetoric as they apply 
to the choice of words and the structure of sentences, paragraphs, 
and whole compositions. Attention will be paid incidentally to 
English spelling, punctuation, and the forms of letters. Frequent 
short themes, several essays, and occasional exercises in class 
will be written. Regular conferences with the instructor will 
constitute a part of the course. 

Students should provide themselves with Espenshade's Compo- 
sition and Rhetoric. (D. C. Heath & Co.) 

2. Advanced Course in English Composition. Dr. 

French. McCoy Hall. 

In this class the forms of discourse will be considered, with 
special emphasis on expository writing. The prose writings of 
selected authors will be studied as models. As in Course 1, con- 
stant drill in writing will be provided for, and themes will be 
criticised in the class room (anonymously) and in private confer- 
ences. This course is open to those who have taken Course 1 or 
its equivalent. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. English Poetry in the Age op Wordsworth. Dr. 
West. McCoy Hall. 
A study will be made of the course of English poetry from the 
publication of Lyrical Ballads (1798) to the appearance of Ten- 
nyson's Poems Chiefly Lyrical (1830). Some of the topics for 
particular consideration will be: The course of the movement 
known as the Romantic Revolution in English poetry; differences 
between romanticism and classicism; variety and freedom of 



18 College Courses for Teachers 

verse forms employed in the new poetry; the romantic leaders' 
theories of poetry; the romantic poets' attitude toward nature 
and toward man; the poetry of social revolt; the poetry of ideal 
beauty; anti-romantic poems; poetical romances and tales of the 
" epic revival;" the extreme of lyric delicacy and power; efforts in 
dramatic expression; ballads, odes, sonnets, songs, satires, elegies 
of the period; an age of creative poetry second only to the Eliza- 
bethan era. Special study will be devoted to the poems of Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Southey, Scott, Hogg, Byron, Shelley, Keats, 
Crabbe, Rogers, Campbell, Moore, Elliott, Hunt, Landor. 

Text-books: Herford's Age of Wordsworth and Page's British 
Poets of the Nineteenth Century. 

2. English Literature During the First Half of the 
Eighteenth Century. Dr. West. McCoy Hall. 

A survey will be made of the course of English literature in 
both prose and verse from Defoe's Essay on Projects (1697) to 
Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard (1751). The chief topics 
for consideration will be: The " Classical Age " of English litera- 
ture or England's "Augustan Age;" the literary situation in Eng- 
land on the death of Dryden; the sentimental comedy as a reac- 
tion from the dramatic licentiousness of the preceding genera- 
tion; the periodical essay of the Queen Anne era; the last pre- 
cursors of the modern novel and the earliest actual novels; the 
height of prose satire; the perfection of "classicism" in poetry; 
the English heroic couplet; the lighter poetry of the period — 
"society verse," metrical fables, versified satires and burlesques;' 
pioneers of the revival of romantic and imaginative poetry; sig- 
nificance of the period in the history of English prose. Special 
study will be made of the writings of Defoe, Steele, Addison, 
Swift, Pope, Prior, Gay, Young, Thomson, Collins, Gray, Richard- 
son, Fielding. 

Text-books: Dennis's Age of Pope and Gosse's English Litera- 
ture in the Eighteenth Century. 

FKENCH 

1. Elementary French. Professor Shefloe. McCoy 
Hall. 
An elementary course designed for students who have no knowl- 
edge of the language. The work will consist of a study of the 
grammatical forms and the essentials of syntax, and an extensive 



Courses Offered 19 

reading of suitable texts, with the end in view of a rapid enlarge- 
ment of the student's vocabulary and familiarity with French 
idioms. 

Books: Fraser and Squair, French Grammar; Laboulaye, 
Contes Bleus; Labiche et Martin, Le Voyage de Monsieur Perri- 
chon; About, La Mere de la Marquise; Bo wen, Modern French 
Lyrics. 

2. French Literature. Professor Shefloe. McCoy 
Hall. 

A collegiate course open to students who have a sufficient knowl- 
edge of the language to be able to read it fluently. The work will 
deal with the Romantic movement in France during the first half 
of the nineteenth century, and the following books will be read: 
Chateaubriand, Atala, Rene; Madame de Stael, Pages choisies 
(Rocheblave) ; Lamartine, Meditations (Curme) ; Hugo, Choix de 
Po4sies (Steeg), Hernani (Matzke) ; De Musset, Poetry and Come- 
dies (Kuhns). 

In addition to the class work, a certain amount of private 
reading will be required in works of literary criticism pertaining 
to the subject under consideration. 

Exercises in prose composition will form a distinct part of the 
work. 

(Note. — After the class has been organized, the work of the 
course may be somewhat changed, in order to adapt it to the 
immediate needs of the members.) 

GERMAN 

1. Elementary German. Professor Froelicher. McCoy 

Hall. 

Composition; Grammar; Reading of short stories, selected 
from the works of C. F. Meyer, G. Keller, Sudermann, Hoffmann, 
Heyse. 

Textbooks: Vos, Essentials of German; Bacon, Im Yaterland. 

2. German Literature. Professor Froelicher. McCoy 

Hall. 

A collegiate course open to students who are able to read and 
write German with some facility. Readings in the modern Ger- 
man drama; literary criticism and the study of dramatic form; 
history of the German drama in the nineteenth century. Selec- 
tions from the works of the following authors will be read: 
Grillparzer, Hebbel, Ludwig, Sudermann. 



20 College Courses for Teachers 

The writing of themes in German, oral practice based on sub- 
jects from daily life, and training in grammar will form a part 
of the work. 

(Note. — The work of this course may be modified after the 
organization of the class, in order to meet the special needs of 
the members.) 

HISTORY 

1. American History to 1865. Professor Sioussat. 

McCoy Hall. 

Beginning with a brief treatment of the Age of Discoveries and 
the struggles of European nations for dominion in North America, 
this course will emphasize the growth of the English colonies 
in America, the causes leading to the Revolution and independ- 
ence, the evolution of self-government through the State constitu- 
tions, the Articles of Confederation and the Federal Constitution. 
After a careful study of the new government erected in 1789, the 
interplay of sectional and national forces will be discussed along 
both political and economic lines to the period of the Civil War. 

Text-book: Macdonald's " Documentary Source Book of Ameri- 
can History." 

2. European History, 1763-1848. Professor Sioussat. 

McCoy Hall. 
While emphasizing more particularly the development of the 
French and English peoples, this course will give an outline of 
general European history from the Peace of Paris through the 
Revolutions of 1848. As a guide, the work of Robinson & Beard, 
" The Development of Modern Europe," with the " Readings " 
(both published by Ginn & Co.), will be used. 

LATIN 

1. Caesar. Professor Mustard. McCoy Hall. 

An introductory course, beginning with the first chapter of 
the Gallic War. This course presupposes a working knowledge 
of all regular inflections, of all common irregular forms, and ot 
the ordinary principles of Latin syntax. Special attention will 
be paid to the pronunciation of Latin. Short exercises (both 
oral and written) will be given in Latin Composition. 

Text-book: Caesar, Gallic War, I-IV, ed. C. E. Bennett (Allyn & 
Bacon). 



Courses Offered 21 

2. Virgil's Aeneid. Professor Mustard. McCoy Hall. 

A detailed study of books II and VI. Special attention will be 
paid to prosody, to Virgil's literary art, and to his place and in- 
fluence in literature. Each student will be assigned some special 
topic for individual study, the results of which will be sum- 
marized and reported in the class. 

Text-book: Virgil, Aeneid, I-VI, ed. Fairclough & Brown (B. H. 
Sanborn & Co.). 

MANUAL TEAMING AND MECHANICAL 
DRAWING 

Realizing the great demand for trained teachers of 
hand work in every locality, and believing that the de- 
mand will increase owing to the extension of this subject 
in the various schools, a course in elementary and ad- 
vanced hand work is offered to assist and to train those 
who would otherwise find it impossible to obtain adequate 
instruction necessary to the successful teaching of this 
subject. 

Its purpose is to help those who contemplate entering 
this field to acquaint themselves with methods and prac- 
tice of manual training, giving them the fundamental pro- 
cesses and a working knowledge of the subject with which 
to make a beginning. A more advanced course is ar- 
ranged for those teachers who have already acquired a 
fundamental knowledge of manual training. 

Conferences on subjects of importance to manual train- 
ing teachers will be held in connection with both courses. 

1. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither, Public 
School No. 79. 

Construction in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, basketry, sim- 
ple book-binding and elementary wood-work. Representative pro- 
jects in each will be carried out. This course includes handwork 
processes suitable for the first six years of the elementary schools. 

The course is planned especially to meet the needs of the regu- 
lar grade teacher, but will also be helpful to others who wish to 
become familiar with this work as it is carried on in the ele- 
mentary schools. The models given are such as can be easily re- 
produced in the regular class-room with a simple equipment. 



22 College Courses for Teachers 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical work and 
study of methods. Materials at hand in the various localities and 
their value. Planning equipment and supplies. Cost Outline of 
course. 

Laboratory fee $1.50. 

2. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. 
Mr. Gaither, Public School No. 79. 

This course, employing a comprehensive set of bench work 
tools, and including the elements of joinery and carpentry, and 
mechanical drawing, is planned to prepare the student for teach- 
ing bench work in wood in the upper grades of the elementary 
schools and the lower grades of the secondary schools. 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical instruction 
in the use of tools; Problems involving the various processes of 
the work suggested by the teacher and carried out by the class; 
Methods of class presentation and execution; Organization, plan- 
ning of equipment and supplies; Cost; Outline of course. 

The course in Mechanical Drawing will include the proper use 
of drawing instruments, and the making and the reading of 
simple working drawings, used in connection with the course in 
bench work in wood. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

MATHEMATICS 

1 . Algebra. Professor Hulburt. Physical Laboratory. 

Beginning with quadratic equations, this course will cover 
Algebra (&) of the matriculation requirements. 

2. Plane Analytic Geometry. Professor Hulburt. 

Physical Laboratory. 

This course will be the equivalent of the second half-year of 
the college course designated as Mathematics 1. 

(Note. — Should there be sufficient demand for it, a class in 
Plane Trigonometry, meeting two or three times a week, may be 
organized.) 

PHYSICS 

1. General Physics: Mechanics, Sound and Heat. 
Dr. Anderson. Physical Laboratory. 
A course of lectures and demonstrations, supplemented with 
qualitative and quantitative experiments performed by the stu- 
dent. 



Schedule 



23 



2. General Physics : Optics, Electricity and Magnet- 
ism. Dr. Anderson. Physical Laboratory. 

A course of lectures and demonstrations, supplemented with 
qualitative and quantitative experiments performed by the stu- 
dent. 

Text-book for both courses : Milliken and Gale's " First Course 
in Physics." 

In both courses instruction will also be given in the art of 
constructing simple but efficient apparatus suitable for many ele- 
mentary experiments in Physics. 

(Note. — If students possessing sufficient mathematical prepa- 
ration should present themselves, an advanced course in physics 
will be arranged.) 



SCHEDULE 



Students are urged to select their subjects in accord- 
ance with the following schedule, which is not subject to 
change except to remove important conflicts : 



8.30-9.20 

Educational Administration 

English Composition 2 

French 2 

Latin 2 

Mathematics 2 
9.30-10.20 

Biology 1 

Education in Modern Times 

English Literature 1 

German 1 

History 1 

Physics 1 
10.30-11.20 

Biology 2 

Chemistry 1 

Educational Psychology 

English Composition 1 

French 1 

Latin 1 

Mathematics 1 



11.30-12.20 

Chemistry 2 

Domestic Science 2 

English Literature 2 

German 2 

History 2 

Manual Training 1 

School Hygiene 
12.30-1.20 

Elementary Education 

Physics 2 

Secondary Education 

2.30-4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemistry 3 
Chemical Laboratory 
Domestic Science 1 
Manual Training 2 
Physical Laboratory 



TEE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

FOUNDED 1876 



A FACULTY OP 215 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS, AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



UNDERGRADUATE DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 
(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER SESSION 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS: 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau. 



Thirty-sixth Year opens October 3, 1911. For Circulars, address 

T. R. BALL, Registrar, 

Baltimore, Md. 



W 1913 No. 3 

THE 



JOHNS HOPKINS 



UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 
JULY 1 -AUGUST 12, 19tJ 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

March, 1913 



[New Series, 1913, No. 3] 
[Whole Number, 263] 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



CALENDAR, 1913 



June 10, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



June 28, Saturday — 1 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration at the office 
r — 5 



June 30, Monday — j of the Registrar, McCoy Hall. 



July 1, Tuesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 
begins. 

July 4, Friday — Independence Day. All exercises suspended. 

August 12, Tuesday — Examinations and close of Summer Courses. 



October 7, Tuesday — Thirty-eighth regular session begins. 



#^\A11 work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, July 1. 
It is important that students should reach Baltimore in time to 
be present at the opening exercises in each class. Registration 
may be made by mail prior to June 28. 



SUMMER COURSES 



1913 




BALTIMORE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 
1913 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

SUMMER COURSES 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

WILLIAM H. WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 

Chairman, Administrative Committee 

EDWARD F. BUCHNER, PH. D. 

Professor of Education and Philosophy 
Director of the Summer Courses 

THOMAS R. BALL 
Registrar 

W. GRAHAM BOYCE, A. B. 
Treasurer 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

New Series, 1913, No. 3 MARCH, 1913 Whole Number, 253 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The third year of the Summer Courses of the Johns 
Hopkins University will open on Tuesday, July 1, and 
continue until Tuesday, August 12, inclusive. Exercises 
in each subject will be held every week-day except Satur- 
day. With few exceptions, each course will consist of 
thirty class exercises. In the sciences laboratory work 
will be additional. Examinations will be held at the 
close of the courses. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees, 
and their credits fixed by the Board of Collegiate Studies, 
they are an integral part of the work of the University. All 
the resources of the institution essential to their conduct 
are placed at the disposal of the students. These resources 
include the use not only of the academic buildings, but 
also of the general and departmental libraries, labora- 
tories, and gymnasium. 

The principal object of the University in making pro- 
vision for the summer work is to furnish instruction to 
teachers in all grades of schools, and to other persons who 
seek opportunities for instruction, with or without refer- 
ence to an academic degree. Some courses offered are de- 
signed to meet the needs of matriculated students who wish 

3 



4 Summer Courses [148 

to advance their standing or to make up deficiencies; 
others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in 
part the entrance requirements. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which 
characterizes the work of the regular session in the sub- 
jects representing collegiate departments, as well as in 
those introduced to meet the special needs of teachers. 
In addition to the regular class exercises, each instructor 
holds a daily conference, in which the work of his course 
is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs of 
individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

There will be conducted at the University during the 
session an elementary school of seven grades, designed 
primarily to demonstrate typical means and material for 
more effective teaching in rural schools. 

It is also expected that graded vacation schools will be 
in operation in the city and available for observation in 
connection with some of the work in the courses in edu- 
cation. 

Opportunity will thus be afforded superintendents, 
principals, supervisors and teachers to consider concretely 
many problems in elementary instruction. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Of the courses given in one summer session, matricu- 
lated students, or candidates for matriculation, in this 
University may offer for credit not more than two courses 
in collegiate subjects. In such cases registration and at- 
tendance will be strictly limited to the courses so to be 
offered. 



149] General Statement 5 

For the satisfactory completion of the work of any 
course a credit of not more than one-half a regular course 
will be allowed. The exact amount of credit earned by 
each student will be determined by the instructor accord- 
ing to the work accomplished, subject to the approval of 
the Director. 

Students not matriculated in the University may receive 
certificates of attendance and of the amount of work 
satisfactorily performed. These certificates will indicate 
the value of the work done in each course, and in most 
instances will meet the requirements of superintendents 
and school boards as records of summer study. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Stu- 
dents, both men and women, will be admitted to such 
courses as they are found qualified by the respective in- 
structors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 1, carrying out 
the schedule provided on page 3 of cover. Students are 
advised to register in advance of the opening. 

The Eegistrar's office (McCoy Hall, first floor) will be 
open for registration of students on Saturday, June 28, 
Monday, June 30, and Tuesday, July 1, from 9 a. m. to 
5 p. m. Students should register without delay. After 
July 7, admission to each course will be restricted to 
registered students. After July 9 no change of courses 
will be allowed. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately upon 
registration. 

LOCATION 

The University buildings are situated on Monument 
street and Druid Hill avenue, between Howard and Eutaw 
streets. 



6 Summer Courses [150 

By courtesy of the Baltimore Board of School Com- 
missioners, the instruction in Manual Training and Do- 
mestic Science will be given in Public School No. 79, Park 
avenue and Hoffman street. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. Under very 
exceptional circumstances, a student may register in one 
course only. The tuition fee in such cases will be $15.00. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some 
of the courses. (For details, see statement of courses.) 
No reduction of fee will be allowed for late entrance ; aor 
for withdrawal, except on account of illness or other 
serious and unavoidable causes. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable fur- 
nished rooms in private homes in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity are offered for rent at prices ranging from $1.50 to 
$3.00 per week for a single room, and $3.00 to $7.00 a 
week for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private 
boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging 
from $3.50 to $5.00 per week. A printed list of boarding 
and lodging houses will be sent upon request. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the 
opening and closing receptions, students are invited to 
the lectures and recitals which will be given every Friday 
evening, in co-operation with the Summer Session of the 
Peabody Conservatory of Music. 



151] General Statement 7 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the 
State capital, and to Washington, both within an hour's 
ride by trolley, and to points of interest in and about 
Baltimore. 

UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE 

The University post-office, in McCoy Hall, will be open. 
Students may have their mail addressed to them in care 
of the Johns Hopkins University. 



Summer Courses [152 



INSTRUCTORS 



Anna Brochhausen Education 

A. B., Indiana University, 1907; Director of Practice (1893-1901) and Supervis- 
ing Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Edward P. Buchner Education 

A. B., Leander Clark College, 1889, and A. M., 1892; Ph. D., Yale University, 
1893, and Lecturer and Instructor in Philosophy and Pedagogy, 1892-97 ; 
Professor of Analytical Psychology, New York University, 1896-1901 ; 
Docent, Clark University, 1901-03 ; Professor of Philosophy and Education, 
University of Alabama, 1903-08 ; Professor of Education and Philosophy. 

Albert S. Cook Education 

A. B., Princeton University, 1895, and A. M., 1906; Principal, Belair Academy 
and Graded Schools, 1895-98 ; Principal. Franklin High School, Reisterstown, 
1898-1900 ; Superintendent of Schools, Baltimore County, Md. 

Fletcher B. Dresslar Education 

A. B., Indiana University, 1889, and A. M., 1892; Ph. D., Clark University, 
1894 ; Professor of Psychology and Education, State Normal School, Los 
Angeles, 1894-97; Assistant and Associate Professor of Science and Art of 
Teaching, University of California, 1897-1909; Dean and Professor, School 
of Education, University of Alabama, 1909-11; Chief of the Division of School 
Hygiene and Sanitation, United States Bureau of Education, and Professor of 
Education and School Hygiene, George Peabody College for Teachers. 

John C. French English 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1899; Fellow, 1903-04, and Ph. D., 1905; 
Associate in English. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Supervisor of Boys' Industrial Work in Vacation Schools, New York City, 
1904-08 ; Instructor in Carpentry and Wood Carving, Baltimore Polytechnic 
Institute ; Supervisor of Manual Training Centres, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Robert M. Gay English 

A. B., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1900; A. M., Columbia University, 1901; 
Associate Professor of English, Goucher College. 

J. Elliott Gilpin Chemistry 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1889, and Ph. D., 1892 ; Associate Professor 
of Chemistry. 

John P. Givler Biology 

Ph. B., Hamline University, 1906, and A. M., 1912; Graduate Student, Johns 
Hopkins University, and Student- Assistant in Zoology, 1906-07, 1909-10 ; In- 
structor in Zoology, Haverford College, 1910-11 ; Professor of Biology, South- 
western Kansas College. 

Agnes Ellen Harris Domestic Science 

Oread Institute, 1901 ; Georgia Normal and Industrial College, 1902 ; B. S., 
Columbia University, 1911 ; Director, Department of Home Economics, Florida 
State College for Women. 



153] 



Instructors 



Lorrain S. Hulburt Mathematics 

A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1883, and A. M., 1888; Professor of Mathe- 
matics. University of South Dakota. 1887-91 ; Fellow. Clark University, 
1S91-92; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1894; Collegiate Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Florence M. Lane Education 

S. B., Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1910; Teacher in Horace Mann 
Model School and Tutor in Psychology, Columbia University, 1909-10; Teacher 
in Charge of Model Rural School, First District Normal School, Kirksville, Mo. 

Ralph V. D. Magoffin History and Latin 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1902; Fellow, American School of Classical 
Studies, Rome, 1906-07; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1907-08, and 
Ph. D., 1908; Associate in Greek and Roman History. 

C. Carroll Marden French 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University. 1889, and Ph. D., 1894; Instructor, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1890-91 ; Professor of Spanish. 

Edwin Mims English Literature 

A. B., Vanderbilt University, 1892, and A. M., 1893; Ph. D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1900; Professor of English Literature, Trinity College (N. C), 1894-1909; 
Professor of English Literature, University of North Carolina, 1909-12 ; Head 
of the Department of English, Vanderbilt University. 

William S. Myers History and Politics 

A. B., University of North Carolina, 1897; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1900 ; Master of History, Gilman Country School, 1900-06 ; Assistant Professor 
of History and Politics, Princeton University. 

August H. Pfund Physics 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1901; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 
1905-06; Ph. D., 1906; Assistant, 1906-07, and Johnston Scholar, 1907-09; 
Associate Professor of Physics. 

Samuel C, Schmucker Biology 

A. B., Muhlenberg College, 1882; A. M., 1885, and M. S., 1891; Ph, D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1893 ; Professor of Natural Science, Carthage College, 
1883-84; Professor of Natural Science, Indiana Normal School, Pa., 1889-95; 
Professor of Biology, State Normal School, West Chester, Pa. 

Josephine B. Stuart Education 

Principal, Teachers' Training School, Pawtucket, R. I., 1886-87; Principal. 
Teachers' Training School, Portsmouth, N. H., 1887-89 ; Principal, Normal 
and Training School, New Bedford, Mass., 1889-1900; Graduate Instructor in 
Methods of Teaching, Wellesley College, 1902-04 ; Assistant Superintendent of 
Schools, New Bedford, Mass. 

Henry Wood German 

A. B., Haverford College, 1869; Ph. D., University of Leipzig, 1879; Knight of 
the Royal Prussian Order of the Red Eagle, 1910; Professor of German. 



10 Summer Courses [154 

COURSES OF BJSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 

The chief aim of the courses in biology, especially de- 
signed for teachers in the grades and for teachers in 
academies and high schools, will be to develop a point of 
view which shall give a teacher ability, wherever placed, 
to organize the important elements in the natural environ- 
ment of his school into a course which shall be of vital 
human interest to his pupils. Courses 1 and 2, which 
may be taken together, will consist of lectures, each one 
hour daily, supplemented by laboratory and field exer- 
cises. Courses 3 and 4 are designed to aid high school 
teachers and others who desire more detailed laboratory 
work in these subjects. 

1. Nature Study in Elementary Education. Professor 

Sch mucker. Biological Laboratory. 

This course will consider especially the pedagogy of the sub- 
ject and its practical application as a subject of study during 
the first four years of school life. It will consider nature as the 
means of awakening the child and enlarging both his powers 
and his stock of ideas. The materials of study, as well as the 
principles, will be carefully considered, particularly in connec- 
tion with the laboratory, field or conference work of each day. 

2. Nature Study as a Preparation for Agriculture. 

Professor Sch mucker. Biological Laboratory. 

In this course such aspects of nature study will be considered 
as best lead to the viewpoint of the student of agriculture. The 
subjects studied will be those that will best serve as a back- 
ground for the subsequent study of agriculture. This course will 
parallel the preceding one, but will throw the emphasis upon 
the practical aspects of the subjects treated. The laboratory, field 
or conference work each day in connection with both courses 
will be conducted at the same time, giving each set of students 
a broader outlook. 



155] Cliemistry 11 

3. Botany. Professor Givler. Biological Laboratory. 

Familiar seeds, fruits, roots, stems and leaves found in the 
markets of Baltimore and in the field are the objects around 
which interest first centers. Germination studies upon various 
types of seeds lead further toward some understanding of seed- 
plants. The microscope, introduced for the study of the finer 
structure of roots and stems, becomes the means whereby the 
simpler algse and fungi are examined. Here the student becomes 
acquainted with some of the fundamental facts of plant structure 
and activity, the nature of protoplasm, some schemes of cellular 
organization, and the origin and meaning of sex in plants. In 
an ascending series of type forms the plan of organization of 
the principal classes of plants is presented, and, in particular, the 
probable origin of the flowering plant with its seed-habit is traced 
from its spore-bearing ancestors. 

4. Zoology. Professor Givler. Biological Laboratory. 

The main purpose of this course is to give the student some 
acquaintance with the organization and systematic relations of 
animals. Throughout the greater part of the course the frog 
will remain the center of interest, serving as a subject for care- 
ful dissection and study and for comparison with other animals. 
Such subjects as the cell tissues, organs and their functions, life- 
history, embryology and economic importance will be discussed 
in connection with various forms from day to day. Work upon 
the frog's skeleton will lead to a careful study of that of man. 
This, with some comparative study of the skeletons of various 
types of vertebrates, will complete the course. 



CHEMISTKY 

1. Introduction to General Chemistry. Associate Pro- 
fessor Gilpin. Chemical Laboratory. 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. 
It will include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of 
the more important non-metallic and metallic elements and their 
properties. Remsen's "Chemistry" (Briefer Course) will be used 
as a basis for the classroom and laboratory work. 

Special emphasis will be laid on the laboratory work, and the 
student will be encouraged to attain such familiarity with some 
of the more important chemical substances and their behavior 
and with methods of laboratory practices as can only be secured 
by personal conference and experimentation in the laboratory. 

Five lectures and 12 hours' laboratory work weekly. 



12 Summer Courses [156 

2. Household Chemistry. Associate Professor Gilpin. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

This course will consist of three lectures and twelve hours' 
laboratory work weekly, and is intended for those who have taken 
courses in elementary chemistry and domestic science. It will 
include a study of fuels, combustion, oxidation, air, water, its 
analysis and purification, food principles, preparation and testing 
of food, and preservatives. 

3. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor 

Gilpin. Chemical Laboratory. 

This course is intended for those who have completed Course 1 
and wish to extend their knowledge of chemistry. It will con- 
sist of two lectures each week and twelve hours' laboratory work. 
The time spent in the laboratory will be devoted chiefly to prac- 
tice in qualitative analysis. 

(Note. — In case there is a sufficient demand for a course in 
organic chemistry instead of Course 3, it will be given. As ar- 
rangements have to be made, students are requested to advise the 
Director in advance.) 

4. Laboratory Work in Inorganic or Organic Prepara- 

tions. Associate Professor Gilpin. Chemical Labo- 
ratory. 

This course may be followed by persons who have had the 
necessary preliminary chemical training. It will consist of labora- 
tory work, twelve hours weekly, based on Renouf's "Inorganic 
Preparations" or Remsen's "Organic Chemistry," and such out- 
side reading as may be deemed advisable by the instructor. 



Laboratory Fees: $5.00, to cover cost of materials, for one 
course or more. (The fee for materials does not include the cost 
of small pieces of apparatus not returnable and the charge for 
breakage, to be paid at the close of the session. This additional 
amount averages about $2.00.) 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1. Selection and Preparation of Foods. Miss Harris. 
Public School No. 79. 

To give a working knowledge of the preparation of simple 
foods is the aim of this course. It will include laboratory work 
in the manipulation of foodstuffs, demonstrations and lectures on 



157] Education 13 

the principles of physics and chemistry that underlie food prepa- 
ration. A consideration of the comparative cost and nutritive 
values of food materials. 

For those students who expect to teach Domestic Science, 
Chemistry 1 is advised as a parallel course. 

Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

2. Experimental and Advanced Cookery. Miss Harris. 

Public School No. 79. 

Preservation of fruits and vegetables. Time-saving devices in 
food preparation. Purchase and manufacture of food. Advanced 
work in food preparation. Planning menus. Consideration of 
food requirement. Serving meals. The principles of Chemistry 
and Physics, underlying food preparation, are considered in 
detail. 

This course is a continuation of Course 1 given in 1912. A 
knowledge of Chemistry and Course 1, or its equivalent, is pre- 
requisite. Students preparing to teach Domestic Science are ad- 
vised to take Household Chemistry parallel. 

Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

3. The Teaching of Household Arts. Miss Harris. 

Public School No. 79. 

This course is designed for the rural teacher who wishes, in 
the absence of equipment sufficient for systematic courses in 
Domestic Art and Science, to introduce the elements of the sub- 
ject in the work of the school. It will include planning a course 
of study and minimum equipment, and special treatment of such 
topics as sanitation, personal hygiene, foods and nutrition, demon- 
strations in cooking, sewing, textiles and clothing. Fairs and 
exhibits of children's work, clubs in bread-making, canning and 
other agencies aiding rural schools to meet some of the problems 
of country life will be considered. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



EDUCATION 

1. Principles of Education. Professor Dresslar. McCoy 
Hall. 

This course is offered as an introduction to the general theory 
of education, and will be limited in the main to the discussion 
of the following topics: Aims of education; biological problems 
in education; individual development; the school as a social in- 
stitution; ethical phases of education; the doctrine of formal 
discipline; interest and effort theories; relative values; the 
psychological bases of teaching; applications of theory to prac- 
tical teaching in both elementary and secondary schools. 



14 Summer Courses [158 

The work will consist of lectures, readings, reports and gen- 
eral discussions. 

Text-book: Ruediger's "Principles of Education" (Houghton- 
Mifflin Company). 

2. Educational Psychology. Professor Buchner. McCoy 

Hall. 

This course of lectures, readings and reports is designed to 
provide opportunity for the study of the principles of general 
psychology in their application to education and teaching. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the chief features of adolescence 
and to the special psychology of the more important school sub- 
jects and activities. The scope of the work will be determined in 
accordance with the knowledge of psychology possessed by the 
students. 

3. School Hygiene. Professor Dresslar. McCoy Hall. 

The aim of this course will be to direct the attention of 
teachers and superintendents to some of the most important 
phases of hygiene and sanitation arising in connection with the 
school life of the children and the teachers. Special topics will 
be: The need of larger and better located school grounds; the 
construction, equipment and sanitation of school buildings; con- 
servation of eyesight and hearing; oral hygiene; medical inspec- 
tion; diseases especially prevalent among school children; physi- 
cal education and its relation to mental development; the prob- 
lem of the sub-normal child; fatigue and the school program; 
the hygiene of instruction; the school as an agent for improving 
the hygienic conditions of a community. 

These and such other topics as time will permit will be pre- 
sented through lectures and assigned readings reported on by 
members of the class. The practical demands of school work 
and school life will be dwelt on throughout the course. 

Text-book: Dresslar's "School Hygiene" (Macmillan). 

4. Supervision of Teaching in Elementary Schools. 

Miss Stuart. McCoy Hall. 

This course is designed for supervisors and principals of ele- 
mentary schools, and instructors in teachers' training schools. It 
will deal with the fundamental problems of teaching in elemen- 
tary schools. Among the topics to be considered are: The 
course of study; characteristics of good teaching; the function of 
supervision; helpful supervision; motiving the teacher; testing 
for efficiency; conservation of the teacher's health and energy; 
home and neighborhood co-operation. 



159] Education 15 

5. The Elementary School: Grammar Grades. Miss 

Stuart. McCoy Hall. 

This course will present the theory and practice of teaching in 
the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades of the ele- 
mentary school. It will include: The formulation of principles 
underlying method; courses of study; teaching pupils how to 
study; motiving the pupils; training for efficiency; character- 
building, and related topics. Special methods for reaching the 
duller section of the class, applied to the teaching in English, 
history, geography, arithmetic and nature study, will be pre- 
sented. Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

6. The Elementary School: Primary Grades. Miss 

Brochhausen. McCoy Hall. 

By means of lectures, reports and discussions, this course will 
consider the problems peculiar to the first, second and third 
grades of the elementary school, especially to the first grade. 
The subject-matter for each grade will be outlined, and effective 
methods for presenting this material will be given. Outside 
reading and written reports will form part of the work. 

7. The Teaching op English and Arithmetic in the 

Elementary School. Miss Brochhausen. McCoy 
Hall. 

The first half of this course of lectures, reports and discussions 
will be devoted to the problems of the course of study and the 
teaching of English throughout the eight grades of the elemen- 
tary school. The work will include a consideration of the sub- 
ject-matter, with emphasis on oral and written composition, its 
relation to spelling and grammar, and the close correlation be- 
tween composition and literature. 

The second half of the course will give attention to the subject- 
matter of arithmetic and the problems of teaching it in the ele- 
mentary school. Special reading and written reports will form 
part of the work. 

8. Organization, Administration and Supervision op 

Rural Schools. Superintendent Cook. McCoy Hall. 

This course of lectures, required readings, and reports is de- 
signed to study the problems of the organization and the adminis- 
tration of rural schools from the viewpoint of state, county and 
district school authorities; school taxes and the apportionment 
of state school funds; various plans for co-operative work in 
rural school improvements — the boys' and girls' club movements; 
the strength and limitations of these and other plans for rural 
school improvement will be discussed. 



16 Summer Courses [160 

The means, purposes and results of supervision of rural schools 
in state, county and district units will be studied by means of 
typical concrete examples of good supervision. 

A brief survey will be made of all the forces and agencies now 
at work to redirect the rural schools for country life, touching 
rural sociology in its relation to the work of the teacher, super- 
visor and superintendent. 

Text-books: Foght's "The American Rural School" (Mac- 
millan) ; Carney's "Country Life and the Country School" (Row, 
Peterson & Co.); "Rural School Supervision," Part II, Yearbook 
of the National Society for Study of Education, 1913 (University 
of Chicago Press) ; Cubberley's "School Funds and Their Appor- 
tionment" (Columbia University). 



9. The Kural School : Methods and Observation. Miss 
Lane. Levering Hall. 

This course will deal with the main difficulties which the 
rural teacher has to face. It will endeavor, by means of a 
demonstration school, class discussion and assigned reading, to 
show some of the ways in which these problems may be worked 
out; to make the one-room school not merely a duplicate of 
schools in the city, but rather an institution adapted to the 
peculiar needs of country life, possessing its own unique advan- 
tages. Methods for time-saving and efficiency will be empha- 
sized. 



10. A Demonstration School. Miss Lane. Levering Hall. 

An elementary school of seven grades will be conducted as a 
basis for the detailed conferences comprised in Course 9 and for 
some of the work in Course 8. It will present demonstrations of 
various means for carrying out the elementary course of study, 
based on the relative importance of subjects, length of recitation, 
alternation, combination of subjects, and grouping of grades. The 
type of teaching problems, presented from week to week, will be 
selected with the view of aiding the teacher of the ungraded rural 
school. Registrations in this course, which should be made in 
advance of the opening, will be filed in the order received. 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Elements of English Composition. Associate Profes- 
sor Gay. McCoy Hall. 

A review of some of the important parts of grammar, of 
punctuation and sentence-structure, and a study of the principles 
of rhetoric and composition, with emphasis on the paragraph. 
Written exercises will be required throughout the course, with 



161] English 17 

criticism and conferences. This course is planned to meet the 
needs of teachers and others who wish to review their high-school 
English composition or to study it for the first time. 

Text-book: Scott and Denny's "Composition-Rhetoric" (Allyn 
& Bacon). 

2. Theme- Writing. Associate Professor Gay. McCoy 

Hall. 

The special work of this class will he the theory and practice 
of exposition. The other forms of discourse will be discussed 
briefly, and the prose writings of selected authors will be studied 
as models. Constant drill in writing will be provided for, and 
the themes and essays will be criticised in the classroom 
(anonymously) and in private conference. The work is of the 
same grade as the usual college freshman course. 

Text-book: Canby and others, "English Composition in Theory 
and Practice," Revised Edition, 1912 (Macmillan). 

3. Advanced Exposition. Associate Professor Gay. McCoy 

Hall. 

A study of the formal essay and of practical methods of obtain- 
ing material, indexing and outlining it, and presenting it in re- 
ports, essays, treatises, etc. A feature of the course will be the 
assignment of special field work for obtaining material to be 
used in class, and some practice will be afforded in the use of 
libraries, reference books and indexes. The course is offered only 
to students who have had Course 2 or its equivalent. 

Text-book: Baldwin's "College Manual of Rhetoric" (Long- 
mans, Green & Co.). 

4. Oral English. Dr. French. McCoy Hall. 

This course is designed to give practice in the various forms 
of unpretentious public speech. It will include the preparation 
and delivery of such speeches as are not infrequently required on 
various special occasions; oral explanation and oral narration, 
such as enter constantly into the routine work of all teachers, 
and practice in the art of phrasing thought on one's feet. It is 
not a course in technical voice culture or in dramatic recital, 
though some use will be made of brief memorized selections for 
the purpose of illustrating the elements of expression. The em- 
phasis of the course will be upon the effective presentation of 
one's own ideas. 

Knapp and French's "The Speech for Special Occasions" (Mac- 
millan) will be used as a text-book. 



18 Summer Courses [162 



ENGLISH LITEBATURE 

1. A General Survey of English Literature from 

Milton to Tennyson. Professor Mims. McCoy Hall. 

The emphasis of this course will be laid on poetry rather than 
on prose, and especially on such poetry as will be of interest to 
those who are teaching English in the high schools. At the same 
time an effort will be made to give the students some idea of the 
evolution of English poetry within the period indicated and to 
encourage them to pursue their studies further. 

Text-book: "Century Readings in English Literature." 

2. The Prose of the Nineteenth Century. Professor 

Mims. McCoy Hall. 

A careful study will be made of Lamb's "Essays of Elia," 
Carlyle's "Heroes and Hero Worship" and "Sartor Resartus," 
Ruskin's "Crown of Wild Olive," and "Selections from Matthew 
Arnold" (Gates). Some attention will be devoted to the style 
as well as to the subject-matter of these books. Lectures will be 
given on the more important phases of English life and thought 
in the nineteenth century. 

Text-books: Any good editions of the writings mentioned. 

3. American Literature. Dr. French. McCoy Hall. 

The course will consist of a rapid survey of American literary 
history, with special reference to the forces that have influenced 
literature, followed by a study of American poetry from Preneau 
to the present day. Poems representing various literary types 
will be selected for critical reading and will serve as the basis 
of written reports. These will include, so far as possible, the 
American poems usually required for admission to college, and 
such familiar poems as "Thanatopsis," "Evangeline," "Hiawatha," 
and "The Commemoration Ode." 

Cairns's "A History of American Literature" (The Oxford Press) 
will be used as a handbook. Stedman's "American Anthology" 
will be useful as a source of texts. 



FRENCH 



1. Elementary French. Professor Marden. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have no knowledge 
of the language. The work will consist of a study of the 
essentials of grammar, drill on pronunciation, practice in writing, 
and extensive reading of texts. 



163] German 19 

Text-books: Fraser and Squair, Shorter French Grammar; 
George Sand, La Mare au Diable; Labiche et Martin, Le Voyage 
de Monsieur Perrichon. 

(Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted 
as partial fulfillment of the entrance requirement in French). 

2. French Literature. Professor Marden. McCoy Hall. 

Students entering this course are supposed to have an accurate 
knowledge of the essentials of French grammar, and the ability 
to read without difficulty simple French prose. The minimum of 
preparation for entrance is the work outlined for Course 1. 
Work in literature will center on the classic drama, but the de- 
tails of reading will be suited to the requirements of the class 
after organization. Exercises in composition and grammar will 
continue throughout the term. 

Text-books: Fraser and Squair, French Grammar, Part II; 
Merimee, Colomoa; Corneille, Cid; Racine, Phedre; Moli£re, Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme. 



GERMAN 



1. Elementary German. Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. 

The elements of German grammar, accompanied by oral prac- 
tice and short exercises in writing. 

Text-book: Vos, "Essentials of German" (Holt & Co.). 

(Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted 
as partial fulfillment of the entrance requirement in German). 

2. Readings in German. Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have had the equiva- 
lent of Course 1, in whole or in part. Along with the prose 
readings, short German poems (previously learned) will each day 
be commented on toward the end of the hour. 

Text-books: von Wildenbruch, Das edle Bint (Siepmann's 
German Texts, The Macmillan Co.); Wilhelm Raabe, Else von 
der Tanne (Oxford University Press, American Branch, New 
York) ; J. H. Dillard, Aus dem deutschen Dichterwald (Ameri- 
can Book Co.). 

3. German Lyric Poetry. Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. 

German verse will be considered in its chief phases and repre- 
sentatives, from Klopstock to the present time, with illustrations 
and examples from earlier periods. The point of view will be 
that of careful literary appreciation and of the study of lyrical 
expression. In the final part of the course, poems of Conrad 
Ferdinand Meyer will be compared in earlier and later versions, 



20 Summer Courses [164 

as a means of elementary training in the judgment of poetic 
style. 

Text-book: "The Oxford Book of German Verse." The cheaper 
edition in cloth. (Oxford University Press, American Branch.) 



HISTORY 

1. The History of Greece and Rome. Dr. Magoffin. 

McCoy Hall. 

This course of lectures, conferences and map studies will bring 
into prominence the relations which existed between Greece and 
Rome. Stress will be laid upon the archaeological, social and re- 
ligious sides of recent historical investigations in the classical 
field. 

Text-books: Goodspeed, "History of the Ancient World" (Scrib- 
ner); Fling, "A Source Book of Greek History," and Munro, "A 
Source Book of Roman History" (D. C. Heath & Co.); McKinley, 
"Historical Notebook for Ancient History" (McKinley Pub. Co.). 

2. European History Since 1815. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. 

Beginning with a brief treatment of the reconstruction of 
Europe after the fall of Napoleon, special attention will be given 
to the development of Italian and German unity, the movements 
leading to the present alignment of the powers, and the causes 
of the last Balkan War. 

Text-books: C. D. Hazen, "Europe Since 1815" (Holt); J. W. 
Headlam, "Bismarck" (Putnam); M. Cesaresco, "Cavour" (Mac- 
millan). Suggestions for further readings also will be made 
from time to time. 

3. American History, 1850-1877. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. 

Secession, Civil War (military details omitted) and Recon- 
struction. A consideration of the constitutional, political and 
economic questions involved. Special attention will be given to 
the methods of gathering materials for the study and teaching of 
American history. The various libraries in Baltimore offer ex- 
cellent opportunity for work of this character. 

Text-books: W. Wilson, "Division and Reunion" (Longmans, 
Green and Co.); T. C. Smith, "Parties and Slavery" (Harper); 
W. A. Dunning, "Reconstruction, Political and Economic" 
(Harper). 



165] Latin 21 



LATIN 



1. Beginning Latin. Dr. Magoffin. McCoy Hall. 

This course will cover the entire first year of high school 
Latin. A thorough drill in forms will be given which will train 
the ear and the eye, as well as the memory. Especial care will 
be taken to meet the needs both of the student taking Latin for 
the first time and of the teacher who is reviewing the subject. 

Text-book: Collar and Daniell, "First Year Latin" (Ginn & 
Co.). 

(Should there be a demand for a course in Caesar, Cicero or 
Vergil instead of the above, arrangements will be made accord- 
ingly.) 

2. Livy, Books 21 and 22. Dr. Magoffin. McCoy Hall. 

This is designed to be a reading course in Latin, and will cover 
the equivalent of the first half-year in college Latin. A proper 
amount of attention will be given to the historical and military 
importance of Hannibal's campaigns as described in these books, 
but particular effort will be made to increase the ability of the 
students to read Latin, and to translate it into idiomatic English. 

Text-book: Lord, "Livy, Books I, XXI, XXII" (Sanborn). 



MANUAL TRAINING AND MECHANICAL 
DRAWING 

Realizing the great demand for trained teachers of 
hand work in every locality, and believing that the de- 
mand will increase owing to the extension of this subject 
in the various schools, courses in elementary and in ad- 
vanced hand work are offered to assist and to train those 
who would otherwise find it impossible to obtain adequate 
instruction necessary to the successful teaching of this 
subject. The aim of the instruction is to help those who 
contemplate entering this field to acquaint themselves 
with methods and practice of manual training, giving 
them the fundamental processes and a working knowledge 
of the subject with which to make a beginning. More ad- 
vanced work is arranged for those who have a funda- 
mental knowledge of manual training. 



22 Summer Courses [166 

Conferences on subjects of importance to manual train- 
ing teachers will be held in connection with both courses. 

1. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. Pub- 

lic School No. 79. 

Construction in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, basketry, 
simple bookbinding and elementary woodwork. Representative 
projects in each will be carried out. This course includes hand- 
work processes suitable for the first six years of the elementary 
schools. 

The course is planned to meet the needs of the regular grade 
teacher, but will also be helpful to others who wish to become 
familiar with this work as it is carried on in the elementary 
schools. The models given are such as can be easily reproduced 
in the regular classroom with a simple equipment. 

Manual training exercises suitable for rural schools, where ma- 
terials and equipment are limited, will be presented. Helpful 
models illustrating the use of the simplest materials will be em- 
ployed in demonstrations. 

For those who pursued this course in the summer session of 
1912 and desire to continue the subject, advanced work is offered, 
employing more intricate models, with exercises in materials and 
methods. 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical work and 
study of methods. Materials at hand in the various localities and 
their value. Planning equipment and supplies. Cost. Outlines 
of course for both city and rural schools. 

Laboratory fee, $1.50. 

2. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. Mr. 

Gaither. Public School No. 79. 

This course, employing a comprehensive set of bench work 
tools, and including the elements of joinery and carpentry, and 
mechanical drawing, is planned to prepare the student for teach- 
ing bench work in wood in the upper grades of the elementary 
schools and the lower grades of the secondary schools. 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical instruction 
in the use of tools; Problems involving the various processes of 
the work suggested by the teacher and carried out by the class; 
Methods of class presentation and execution; Organization, plan- 
ning of equipment and supplies; Cost; Outline of course. 

For those who pursued this course in the summer session of 
1912 and desire to continue the subject, a special course is offered 
in advanced construction in wood, dealing mainly with projects 
in simple furniture construction, using both hard and soft woods. 
Methods of finishing and decorating will also receive attention. 

The course in Mechanical Drawing will include the proper use 
of drawing instruments, and the making and the reading of 
simple working drawings, used in connection with the course in 
bench work in wood. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. 



167] Mathematics 23 



MATHEMATICS 

1. Plane Analytic Geometry. Professor Hulburt. 

Physical Laboratory. 

A knowledge of algebra through quadratics, of plane geometry 
and of plane trigonometry is a prerequisite of this course. 

2. Differential and Integral Calculus. Professor Hul- 

burt. Physical Laboratory. 

This course is for beginners in the subject. An elementary 
knowledge of plane analytic geometry is presupposed. 

Both of these courses are of collegiate grade. 

(Note. — Should there be a sufficient demand for work in plane 
trigonometry, theory of equations, determinants, or projective 
geometry, a class may be formed to meet three times a week. 



MUSIC 



The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing 
a summer session of six weeks, July first to August twelfth. Its 
program includes courses in Public School Music, Normal Classes, 
Singing, Piano, Organ, and other subjects. 

As the buildings of the University and the Conservatory are in 
close proximity, students desiring instruction in music will find 
it convenient to arrange their courses in the two institutions. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application 
to either the University or the Conservatory. 



POLITICS 

The American Government: National, State and Mu- 
nicipal. Assistant Professor Myers. McCoy Hall. 

A study of the nature and operation of constitutional govern- 
ment, and of the way in which public policy is formulated and 
the public business is conducted. Consideration will be given to 
political problems of the present day. 

Text-books: J. Bryce, "The American Commonwealth" (Mac- 
millan), (the abridged edition will be sufficient, but the regular 
two-volume edition is preferred) ; W. B. Munro, "The Govern- 
ment of American Cities" (Macmillan). Parallel readings on 
special topics for investigation. 



24 Summer Courses [168 

PHYSICS 

1. General Physics: Mechanics and Heat. Associate 

Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

A collegiate course of lectures, experimental demonstrations 
and recitations. 

2. Laboratory Course: Mechanics and Heat. Associate 

Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

Qualitative and quantitative experiments, to accompany Course 
1, to be performed by the student. Four two-hour periods per 
week. 

3. General Physics : Electricity and Magnetism. Asso- 

ciate Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

A collegiate course of lectures, experimental demonstrations 
and recitations. 

4. Laboratory Course: Electricity and Magnetism. As- 

sociate Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

Qualitative and quantitative experiments, to accompany Course 
1, to be performed by the student. Four two-hour periods per 
week. 

Text-books: Courses 1 and 3, Ames, "Text-book of General 
Physics"; Courses 2 and 4, Ames and Bliss, "Manual of Experi- 
ments in Physics." 

Prerequisite: Mathematics, including trigonometry. 

5. Physical Optics. Associate Professor Pfund. Physi- 

cal Laboratory. 

An advanced course on refraction, dispersion, interference, dif- 
fraction, polarization and radiation, accompanied by lecture 
demonstrations. Three lectures weekly. 

6. Laboratory Course: Physical Optics. Associate 

Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

This course of experiments accompanies Course 5. The student 
is trained to acquire a thorough working knowledge of spectro- 
meters, interferometers, gratings, etc. Special emphasis is laid 
on the study of modern instruments of high efficiency. Three 
two-hour periods per week. 



SCHEDULE 



8.30—9.20 

Biology 2 
Domestic Science 1 

(8.30—10.20) 
Education 7 
English Composition 3 
German 3 
History 3 
Latin 2 

Manual Training 2 
Mathematics 2 
Physics 5 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 3 

Domestic Science 1 
Education 1 
English Composition 4 
German 1 
History 1 
Mathematics 1 

9.30—11.30 

Education 10 (Demonstra- 
tion School) 

10.30—11.20 

Domestic Science 2 

(10.30—12.20) 
Education 2 
Education 4 
English Composition 2 
English Literature 1 
French 1 



Latin 1 

Manual Training 1 
Physics 1 
Politics 1 

11.30—12.30 
Biology 1 
Chemistry 1 
Domestic Science 2 
Education 3 
Education 5 
English Composition 1 
English Literature 3 
German 2 
History 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 4 
Education 6 
Education 8 
English Literature 2 
French 2 
Physics 3 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 2 
Chemistry 3 



(M.W.F.) 
(T. Th.) 



2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemistry 4 
Chemical Laboratory 
Domestic Science 3 
Education 9 
Physics 2, 4, and 6 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 
FOUNDED 1876 



A FACULTY OF 233 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
Degree A. B. 
(Open to Men) 



SCIENCES 



SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 
(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Sertice, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



Thirty-eighth year opens October 7, 1913. For circulars, address 
T. R. BALL, Registrar. 



1914 No. 2 

THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

tlSWEBSlTY OF lLUBMS LIBRARY 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 6 -AUGUST 13 
1914 




Baltimore, Maryland 
Published by the U 
Issued Monthly fbom Ootobeb to~3u13 
February, 1914 



New Series, 1914, No. 2] 
[Whole Number, 262] 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



CALENDAR, 1914 



June 9, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



t U ! 7 ?' Thursday- | 9 a . m . to 5 p. m., 



Registration at the office 
Registrar, McCoy Hall. 



July 4, Saturday. Independence Day. University buildings closed. 

July 6, Monday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 
begins 

July 11, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 13, Thursday — Examinations and close of Summer Courses. 



October 6, Tuesday — Thirty-ninth regular session begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Monday morning, July 6. It 
is important that students should reach Baltimore in time to be 
present at the opening exercises in each class. Registration may 
be made by mail prior to July 6. 



SUMMER COURSES 



1914 




BALTIMOKE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1914 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
SUMMER COURSES 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

WILLIAM H. WELCH, M. D., LL. D. 
Chairman, Administrative Committee 

EDWARD F. BUCHNER, Ph.D. 
Director of the Summer Courses 

THOMAS R. BALL, 
Registrar 

W. GRAHAM BOYCE, 
Treasurer 



v'NlV 



B^-""*"* 




THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

New Series, 1914, No. 2 FEBRUARY, 1914 "Whole Number, 262 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The fourth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns 
Hopkins University will open on Monday, July 6, and con- 
tinue until Thursday, August 13, inclusive. Exercises in 
each subject will be held every week-day, Monday to Friday. 
In addition, on Saturday, July 11, classes will meet as usual. 
Each course will consist of thirty class exercises or their 
equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will be addi- 
tional. Examinations will be held at the close of the courses. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees, 
and their credits fixed by the Board of Collegiate Studies, 
they are an integral part of the work of the University. All 
the resources of the institution essential to their conduct are 
placed at the disposal of the students. These resources in- 
clude the use not only of the academic buildings, but also 
of the general and departmental libraries, laboratories, and 
gymnasium. 

The principal object of the University in making pro- 
vision for the summer work is to furnish instruction to 
teachers in all grades of schools, and to other persons who 
seek opportunities for instruction, with or without reference 
to an academic degree. Some courses offered are designed 
to meet the needs of matriculated students who wish to ad- 
vance their standing or to make up deficiencies; others, to 
enable non-matriculated students to absolve in part the 

3 



4 Summer Courses [116 

entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs 
of schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which 
characterizes the work of the regular session in the subjects 
representing collegiate departments, as well as in those in- 
troduced to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition 
to the regular class exercises, instructors hold daily confer- 
ences, in which the work of the courses is supplemented 
and adapted to the particular needs of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

There will be conducted at the University during the 
session an elementary school of seven grades, designed pri- 
marily to demonstrate typical means and material for more 
effective teaching in rural schools. 

It is expected that graded vacation schools, including a 
vocational school, will be in operation in the city and avail- 
able for observation in connection with some of the work in 
the courses in education. 

Opportunity will thus be afforded superintendents, prin- 
cipals, supervisors and teachers to consider concretely many 
problems in elementary instruction. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Of the courses given in one summer session, matriculated 
students, or candidates for matriculation, in this University 
may offer for credit not more than two courses in collegiate 
subjects. In such cases registration and attendance will be 
strictly limited to the courses so offered. 

For the satisfactory completion of the work of any course 



117] Admission and Attendance 5 

a credit of not more than one-half a regular course will be 
allowed. The exact amount of credit earned by each student 
will be determined by the instructor according to the work 
accomplished, subject to the approval of the Director. 

Students not matriculated in the University may receive 
certificates of attendance and of the amount of work satis- 
factorily performed. These certificates will indicate the 
value of the work done in each course, and in most instances 
will meet the requirements of superintendents and school 
boards as records of summer study. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Stu- 
dents, both men and women, will be admitted to such 
courses as they are found qualified by the respective in- 
structors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 6, carrying out 
the schedule provided on page 24. Students are advised to 
register in advance of the opening. 

The Eegistrar's office (McCoy Hall, first floor) will be 
open for registration of students on Thursday, July 2, Fri- 
day, July 3, and Monday, July 6, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
The university buildings will be closed Saturday, July 4. 
Students should register without delay. After July 9, ad- 
mission to each course will be restricted to registered stu- 
dents. After July 13 no change of courses will be allowed. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately upon 
registration. 

LOCATION 

The University buildings are situated on Monument street 
and Druid Hill avenue, between Howard and Eutaw streets. 



6 Summer Courses [118 

By courtesy of the Baltimore Board of School Commis- 
sioners, the instruction in Manual Training and Domestic 
Science will be given in Public School No. 79, Park avenue 
and Hoffman street. 

expenses 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. (Under very 
exceptional circumstances, a student may register in one 
course only. The tuition fee in such cases will be $15.00). 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some 
of the courses. (For details, see statement of courses). No 
reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance; nor for 
withdrawal, except on account of illness or other serious 
and unavoidable causes. 



BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable fur- 
nished rooms in private homes in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity are offered for rent at prices ranging from $1.50 to 
$3.00 per week for a single room, and $3.00 to $7.00 a week 
for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private boarding- 
houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging from $3.50 
to $5.00 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodging 
houses will be sent upon request. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the 
opening and closing receptions, students are invited to the 
lectures and recitals which will be given every Wednesday 
afternoon and Friday evening, in co-operation with the Sum- 
mer Session of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. 



119] Courses for Graduates in Medicine 



EXCURSIONS 



Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State 
capital, and to Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride 
by trolley, and to points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE 

The University post-office, in McCoy Hall, will be open. 
Students may have their mail addressed in care of the Johns 
Hopkins University. 

SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning June 1st and extending for six weeks, the 
Medical School of the Johns Hopkins University, in co- 
operation with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, offers to gradu- 
ates in medicine courses in Medicine, Surgery and the 
various specialties as well as in several of the underlying 
scientific branches. The special circular describing these 
courses and any other information concerning them may be 
obtained by addressing the Dean of the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, Washington and Monument Sts. The fees 
vary from $25. to $125. according to the number and char- 
acter of the courses taken. 



Summer Courses [120 



INSTRUCTORS 

Edwaed F. Buchneb Director 

A. B., Leander Clark College, 1889, and A. M., 1892 ; Ph. D M Yale University, 
1893, and Lecturer and Instructor in Philosophy and Pedagogy, 1892-97 ; 
Professor of Analytical Psychology, New York University, 1896-1901 ; Docent, 
Clark University, 1901-03 ; Professor of Philosophy and Education, University 
of Alabama, 1903-08 ; Professor of Education and Philosophy. 

George M. Gaitheb Manual Training 

Supervisor of Boys' Industrial Work in Vacation Schools, New York City, 1904- 
08 ; Instructor in Carpentry and Wood Carving, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute ; 
Supervisor of Manual Training Centres, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Robert M. Gay English 

A. B., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1900 ; A. M., Columbia University, 1901 ; 
Professor of English, Goucher College. 

J. Elliott Gilpin Chemistry 

A. B., Johns Hopkins University, 1889, and Ph. D., 1892 ; Collegiate Professor 
of Chemistry. 

John P. Givleb Biology 

Ph. B., Hamline University, 1906, and A. M„ 1912 ; Graduate Student, Johns 
Hopkins University, and Student- Assistant in Zoology, 1906-07, 1909-10 ; In- 
structor in Zoology, Haverford College, 1910-11 ; Professor of Biology, South- 
western Kansas College. 

Agnes Ellen Harris Domestic Science 

S. B., Columbia University, 1911 ; Director, Department of Home Economics, 
Florida State College for Women. 

Frances M. Kelsey Education 

S. B., and Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1912 ; Principal, 
Director of Practice, and Supervising Principal, Indianapolis, 1890-1900 ; 
Superintendent Training Department, Northern State Normal School, Michigan, 
1992-1911 ; Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Florence M. Lane Education 

Teachers College, Columbia University, 1910 ; Teacher in Horace Mann Model 
School and Tutor in Psychology, Columbia University, 1909-10 ; Professor of 
Rural Education, in Charge of Model Rural School, First District Normal 
School, Kirksville, Mo. 

Raymond Leguy French 

University of France (Bachelier es Lettres, 1908 ; Ecole Normale Superieure, 1910 ; 
Licencie es Lettres, 1913 ; DiplSme des Etudes Superieures, 1913) ; Instructor 
in Romance Languages. 

Ralph V. D. Magoffin History and Latin 

A. B., University of Michigan, 1902 ; Fellow, American School of Classical 
Studies, Rome, 1906-07 ; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1907-08, and 
Ph. D., 1908; Associate in Greek and Roman History and Roman Archaeology. 

John M. McBryde English 

A. B., University of South Carolina, 1890, and A. M., 1894; Fellow, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1896, and Ph. D., 1897 ; Professor of English, Hollins 
Institute, 1897-1903 ; Associate in English, University of North Carolina, 1904- 
05 ; Professor of English, Sweet Briar College, 1905-09 ; Professor of English, 
University of the South. 



121] Instructors 9 

Wm. Starr Myers History and Politics 

A. B., University of North Carolina, 1897; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1900 ; Master of History, Gilman Country School, 1900-06 ; Assistant Professor 
of History and Politics, Princeton University. 

A. Herman Pfund Physics 

S. B., University of Wisconsin, 1901 ; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1905-06, 
Ph. D., 1906, Assistant, 1906-7, and Johnston Scholar, 1907-09; Associate 
Professor of Physics. 

David M, Robinson Archaeology and Greek Literature 

A. B., University of Chicago, 1898, Fellow in Greek, 1899-1901, and Ph. D., 1904; 

Assistant Professor of Greek, Illinois College, 1904-05 ; American School of 

Classical Studies, Athens (Fellow, 1902-03, and Professor of Greek, 1909-10) ; 
Professor of Classical Archaeology and Greek Epigraphy. 

Willard S. Small Education 

A. B., Tufts College, 1894, and A. M., 1897; Ph. D., Clark University, 1900; 
Professor of Psychology, Michigan State Normal College, 1901-02 ; Professor of 
Psychology and Director of Training, State Normal School, Los Angeles, Cal., 
1902-04 ; Superintendent of City Schools, San Diego, Cal., 1904-05 ; Principal, 
Eastern High School, Washington, D. C. ; Lecturer on Education, George 
Washington University. 

Eugene R. Smith Mathematics 

A. B., Syracuse University, 1896, and A. M., 1898 ; Instructor in Mathematics, 
Montclair (N. J.) High School, 1899-08; Head, Department of Mathematics, 
Polytechnic Preparatory School, Brooklyn, 1908-12 ; Headmaster of the Park 
School, Baltimore. 

Aristogeiton M. Soho Spanish 

Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1898, and Lecturer since 1903 ; Professor of 
Greek and French, St. John's College, 1894-02 ; Professor of French and 
Spanish, Baltimore City College. 

Josephine B. Stuart Education 

Principal, Teachers' Training School, Pawtucket, R. L, 1886-87 ; Principal, 
Teachers' Training School, Portsmouth, N. H., 1887-89 ; Principal. Normal 
and Training School, New Bedford, Mass., 1889-1900 ; Graduate Instructor in 
Methods of Teaching, Wellesley College, 1902-04 ; Assistant Superintendent of 
Schools, New Bedford, Mass. 

George R. M. Wells Education 

A. B., McMaster University, 1906 ; A. M., Harvard University, 1909 ; Ph. D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1912 ; Associate Professor of Psychology, Oberlin 
College. 

Henry Wood German 

A. B., Haverford College, 1869; Ph. D., University of Leipzig, 1879; Knight of 
the Royal Prussian Order of the Red Eagle, 1910; Professor of German. 



10 Summer Courses [122 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

AKCHAEOLOGY 

Greek Archaeology and Art. Professor Kobinsokt. Mc- 
Coy Hall. 

This course will give a survey of the whole field of Greek art, 
including sculpture, architecture, and vases. Some of the important 
ancient sites which have been excavated will be discussed in lectures, 
and an attempt will be made to give a comprehensive picture of 
ancient Greek life. The needs of teachers of Ancient History as 
well as of the History of Art will be observed. The course will 
consist mainly of lectures, sometimes illustrated with the stere- 
opticon; but readings will be assigned in special books. 

Text-book: Fowler and Wheeler's "Greek Archaeology" (American 
Book Co.). 

BIOLOGY 

1. Botany. Professor Givler. Biological Laboratory. 

Thig ia a course in the biology of plants. It will begin with a 
study of the common Brake or Bracken Fern in the field. After 
thoroughly mastering the structure and life-history of this form the 
student wil] turn to a study of a moss, a liverwort, various sea- 
weeds, and other algae, and finally complete the course with work 
upon the pine and other seed plants. The laboratory and field 
work will be conducted in such fashion as to give the members of 
the class opportunity and experience in studying the natural history 
of plants from various points of view. 

2. Zoology. Professor Givler. Biological Laboratory. 

The main purpose of this course is to give the student some ac- 
quaintance with the organization and systematic relations of ani- 
mals. Throughout the early part of the course the frog will remain 
the centre of interest, serving as a subject for careful dissection 
and study for comparison with other animals. Such subjects as 
the cell, tisues, organs and their functions, life-history, and eco- 
nomic importance will be discussed in connection with various forms 
from day to day. Work upon the frog's skeleton will lead to a 
careful study of that of man. This, with some comparative study 
of the skeletons of various types of vertebrates, will complete the 
course. 



123] Chemistry 11 



CHEMISTEY 

1. Introduction" to General Chemistry. Professor Gil- 

pin. Chemical Laboratory. 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. 
It will include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of 
the more important non-metallic and metallic elements and their 
properties. Remsen's "Chemistry" (Briefer Course) will be used 
as a basis for the classroom and laboratory work. 

Special emphasis will be laid on the laboratory work, and the 
student will be encouraged to attain such familiarity with some 
of the more important chemical substances and their behavior and 
with methods of laboratory practice as can only be secured by 
personal conference and experimentation in the laboratory. 

Five lectures and ten hours' laboratory work weekly. 

2. Household Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. Chemical 

Laboratory. 

This course will consist of two lectures and ten hours' labora- 
tory work weekly, and is intended for those who have taken courses 
in elementary chemistry and domestic science. It will include a 
study of fuels, combustion, oxidation, air, water (its analysis and 
purification ) , food principles, preparation and testing of food, and 
preservatives. 

3. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. Chemical 

Laboratory. 

This course is intended for those who have completed Course 1 
and wish to obtain some knowledge of organic chemistry. Those 
who are taking Course 2 are advised to take the lectures of this 
course also. It will consist of three lectures each week and ten 
hours' laboratory work. The time spent in the laboratory will be 
devoted to the preparation of organic compounds. 

4. Laboratory Work in Inorganic or Organic Prepara- 

tions. Professor Gilpin. Chemical Laboratory. 

This course may be followed by persons who have had the neces- 
sary preliminary chemical training. It will consist of laboratory 
work, twelve hours weekly, based on Renouf's "Inorganic Prepara- 
tions " or Remsen's "Organic Chemistry," and such outside reading 
as may be deemed advisable by the instructor. 



Laboratory Fees: $5.00, to cover cost of materials, for one 
course or more. (The fee for materials does not include the cost 



12 , Summer Courses [124 

of small pieces of apparatus not returnable and the charge for 

breakage, to be paid at the close of the session. This additional 
amount averages about $2.00.) 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1. Elementary Cookery. Miss Harris. Public School 

No. 79. 

The aim of this course is to give a working knowledge of the 
elementary principles of cookery. The course deals with food pre- 
paration based on a knowledge of the composition of foods, and the 
chemical changes produced by heat and moisture. Planning and 
serving simple meals are also included in this course. 

For students planning to specialize in this subject Chemistry 1 
is advised as a parallel course. 

Laboratory fee $5.00. 

2. Advanced Cookery. Miss Harris. Public School No. 

79. 

This course deals with food preparation, with special attention 
given to preservation of fruits and vegetables, by preserving, can- 
ning and jelly making. It includes a study of comparative food 
values, and the planning of meals for individuals and families 
under varying conditions. Opportunity will be given for demonstra- 
tions in the planning and serving of breakfast, dinner and supper. 

Course 1 or its equivalent prerequisite. Students preparing to 
teach Domestic Science are advised to take Chemistry 2 and the 
lectures of Chemistry 3 parallel. 

Laboratory fee $5.00. 

3. Methods of Teaching Domestic Science. Miss Har- 

ris. Public School No. 79. 

This course deals with the problems of teaching Domestic Science. 
In the class work the following topics are treated: educational value, 
the place in the curriculum, equipment for teaching, courses of 
study, planning lessons, methods of presenting work by demonstra- 
tions. Opportunity will be given for practical work in teaching 
a class in Domestic Science. 

This course is open to all former students of Domestic Science, 
and to new students who have had the equivalent of Course 1. 

Laboratory fee $2.00. 



125] Education 13 



EDUCATION 

1. Principles of Education. Professor Buchner. McCoy 

Hall. . 

This course of lectures, readings and reports is designed to 
provide opportunity for an introductory study of the theory of 
education. Attention will be given to educational aims, problems 
of individual development, formal discipline, interest and effort 
theories, relative values, the social phases of the school, and the 
applications of theory to practice in both elementary and secondary 
instruction. 

2. Learning and Tests or Mental Development. Asso- 

ciate Professor Wells. Psychological Laboratory. 

The first half of this course will be devoted to a presentation of 
the results of the experimental study of normal learning. During 
the second half of the course a summary will be made of the facts 
of defective mental development. The several methods of mental 
measurement will be studied, and their respective merits compared. 
The psychological laboratory will be used for the experiments and 
tests, and possibly for demonstration of cases. 

Assigned text and reference readings and reports will be required. 

3. Secondary Education. Dr. Small. McCoy Hall. 

This course will deal with the present status and problems of 
the high school, from the double standpoint of psychology of ado- 
lescence and social utility. It will consist of a brief historical 
sketch of the development of high school education in America; 
discussion of problems of organization with special reference to 
the six-year high school course, the demands for vocational training 
and guidance, crediting of work done outside of the school, and 
relation to college entrance requirements; and a discussion of the 
educational values, the essential content, and the methods of high 
school studies. 

Lectures, reference work, and recitations. Each student will be 
required to carry on a study of some special topic and present a 
written report of such study at the end of the course. 

Johnston's "High School Education " (Scribner) will be used as a 
handbook. 

4. The Elementary School: Grammar Grades. Mrs. 

Kelsey. McCoy Hall. 

Thig course will present the theory and practice of teaching in 
the grades from the fourth to the eighth, inclusive. Emphasis will 
be placed on the characteristics of pupils as they change from 



14 Summer Courses [126 

grade to grade; the adaptation of methods to these changes; the 
specific and difficult problems of the course of study; the needs of 
the varying individualities of grammar grade pupils. Attention will 
be given to the present vocational trend in elementary education. 
Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

5. The Elementary School: Primary Grades. Miss 

Stuart. McCoy Hall. 

By means of lectures, reports, and discussions this course will 
consider methods of presenting the subjects taught in the first, 
second, and third grades of the elementary school. The subject 
matter for each grade will be outlined, and methods of teaching 
which will motivate the pupil and call for self-direction will be 
discussed. Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

6. The Teaching of English and History in the 

Elementary School! Mrs. Kelsey. McCoy Hall. 

The first half of this course of lectures and required reports on 
collateral reading will be devoted to the problems of the teaching of 
English throughout the eight grades of the elementary school. 
Attention will be given to means for the pupil's utilization of his 
own efforts. Illustrative material will be available for the treat- 
ment of reading, story-telling, oral and written compositions, and 
children's literature. 

The second half of the course will be devoted to the subject mat- 
ter of history and the problems of teaching it in the elementary 
school. 



7. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Geography in the 

Elementary School. Miss Stuart. McCoy Hall. 

The first half of this course will be devoted to the teaching of 
arithmetic throughout the eight grades of the elementary school. 

The second half of the course will give attention to the subject 
matter of geography and to methods of teaching it to develop recog- 
nition of values and organization of the facts and ideas presented 
by the subject. Outside reading and written reports will be re- 
quired. 

8. The Eural School: Methods Course. Miss Lane. 

McCoy Hall. 

This course will furnish opportunity for a discussion of the prin- 
ciples illustrated in the demonstration school. The teacher's work 
in routine school duties and her wide opportunity as community 
leader will be emphasized. Only those methods which have proved 
effective for economy and efficiency in rural schools will be pre- 



127] English Composition 15 

sented. Attention will be given to the country school as a social 
centre, and the organization of children's and patron's clubs for 
agricultural, literary, and social purposes. Illustrative material 
will be available. 

Registration in this course is limited to those taking Education 
9, which is a parallel course. 

9. A Demonstration School : Observation Course. Miss 
Lane. McCoy Hall. 

In this school all of the subjects which the state course of study 
requires to be studied in the first seven grades will be illustrated. 
Devices for varying drill work and methods adapted to develop in- 
itiative and power on the part of pupils will receive emphasis. In 
the hand-work illustrated for country schools, inexpensive and 
easily procurable materials will be principally used. The aim will 
be to present a practical country school based upon approved ex- 
perience. 

Registrations for this course, which should be made in advance 
of the opening, will be filed in the order received. [If taken alone, 
the fee for the course is $25.00.] 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Elements of English Composition. Professor Cay. 

McCoy Hall. 

A review of some of the important parts of grammar, of punc- 
tuation and sentence-structure, and a study of the principles of 
rhetoric and composition, with emphasis on the paragraph. Written 
exercises will be required throughout the course, with criticism and 
conferences. This course is planned to meet the needs of teachers 
and others who wish to review their high-school English composition 
or to study it for the first time. 

Text-book : Robins and Perkins, " Introduction to Rhetoric " 
(Macmillan), revised edition. 

2. Description and Narration. Professor Gay. McCoy 

Hall. 

Description and narration will be studied, especially as exempli- 
fied in the sketch, the tale, the short story, and the one-act play. 
Constant practice will be afforded in writing, and themes will be 
criticised in the classroom (anonymously) and in private con- 
ferences. 



16 Summer Courses [128 

3. Foundations op English Grammar. Professor 
McBryde. McCoy Hall. 

This course, consisting of a history of the English language to- 
gether with a discussion of problems in English syntax, is designed 
especially for high school teachers. 

Text-book: "Modern English," Krapp ( Scribner's ) . 



ENGLISH LITEEATUEE 

1. Shakespeare. Professor McBryde. McCoy Hall. 

A careful study will be made of one historical play, Henry V ; 
of one comedy, Twelfth Night; and of one tragedy, Hamlet, includ- 
ing also some discussion of the development of the drama and of 
the growth of the Elizabethan theatre. 

Text-books : " Introduction to Shakespeare," MacCracken, Pierce, 
and Durham (Macmillan) ; the one-volume edition of Shakespeare 
(Oxford University Press). 

2. The Greater Eomantic Poets. Professor McBryde. 

McCoy Hall. 

In this course special study will be given to those poems of 
the period indicated which are included among the college entrance 
requirements, and at the same time an attempt will be made to 
furnish the students with some idea of the social and philosophic 
forces which animated the romantic movement in England. The 
authors to be studied are: Wordsworth, short ballads and lyrics; 
narrative and pastoral poems, Michael; odes and sonnets; Coleridge, 
Ancient Mariner and Christdbel; Scott, Lady of the Lake; Byron, 
lyrics; narrative and descriptive poems, Prisoner of Ghillon and 
Childe Harold; satires, Vision of Judgment; dramas, Manfred; 
Shelley, Ode to the West Wind, The Cloud, To a Skylark; Keats, 
Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn, To Autumn, and Eve 
of St. Agnes. 

Text-book : Bronson's " English Poems," Nineteenth Century ( Uni- 
versity of Chicago Press). 

3. The Novel. Professor Gay. McCoy Hall. 

A study of the great novelists of the nineteenth century, — Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Meredith and Hardy. Students 
intending to enter the course are urged to read the following novels 
before entering: — The Heart of Midlothian, David Copperfield, Van- 
ity Fair, Adam Bede, The Ordeal of Richard Fever el and The Return 
of the Native. These will be made the basis of discussions and 
short papers. The place of these novels and novelists in the history 
of fiction and of literature in general will be presented in occasional 
lectures. 



129] French 17 

4. Greek Literature in English. Professor Eobinson. 
McCoy Hall. 

This course will present the history of Greek literature from 
Homer to Theocritus, and is intended primarily for students who 
know no Greek. It will be of value to teachers of English litera- 
ture and Ancient History. Lectures will be given on the Greek 
Epic, Iambic, Elegiac, and Lyric poets, followed by an account of 
the Greek tragedians and comedians, and also of the Greek histo- 
rians, orators, and philosophers. Constant use will be made of the 
standard English translations, and the influence of Greek literature 
on English will be constantly emphasized. 



FKENCH 

1. Elementary French. M. Leguy. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have no knowledge 
of the language. The work will consist of a study of the essentials 
of grammar, drill on pronunciation, practice in writing, and exten- 
sive reading of texts. 

Text-books : Aldrich and Foster, " Foundations of French " ( Ginn 
& Co.); Verne, " Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours" (Mac- 
millan ) ; Labiche et Martin, " Le voyage de Monsieur Perrichon " 
(American Book Co.). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfillment of the entrance requirement in French). 

2. Headings in French. M. Leguy. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent 
of Course 1, in whole or in part. 

Text-books: Sardou, " Les pattes de mouche " (Heath & Co.); 
About, "La mere de la marquise" (Heath &'Co.) ; Buffum, " French 
Short Stories" (Holt & Co.). 

3. French Comedy. M. Leguy. McCoy Hall. 

Students entering this course are supposed to have an accurate 
knowledge of the essentials of French grammar and the ability 
to read simple French without difficulty. The minimum of prepara- 
tion for entrance is the work outlined for Course 1. Work in 
composition will accompany the reading of texts. Text-books: Mo- 
Here, " Tartuff e " (Heath & Co.) ; Marivaux, " Le jeu de l'amour et 
du hasard " (Macmillan) ; Beaumarchais, " Le barbier de Seville" 
(Heath & Co.) ; Musset, " Trois comedies" (Heath & Co.) ; Augier, 
" Le gendre de M. Poirier " ( American Book Co. ) ; Pailleron, " Le 
monde oil Ton s'ennuie " (Heath & Co.); Comfort, "French Com- 
position" (Heath & Co.). 



18 Summer Courses [130 

GERMAN 

1. Elementary German. Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. 

The elements of German grammar, accompanied by oral practice 
and short exercises in writing, after which short stories will be read 
from Schwarzwaldleuf, edited Roedder (Holt & Co.). 

Text-book: Vos, "Essentials of German" (Holt & Co.). 

(Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfillment of the entrance requirement in German). 

2. Readings in German. Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent 
of Course 1, in whole or in part. 

Text-books: Storm, Auf der Universitat, edited Corwin (Holt & 
Co.) ; Arnold, Einst im Mai, edited Lovell (Holt & Co.) ; Keller, 
Romeo und Julia auf dem Dorfe, edited Corwin (Holt & Co.). 

3. Modern German Drama. Professor Wood. McCoy 

Hall. 

For students who possess some facility in reading and writing 
German. Weekly themes (in German or English) will supplement 
the course. The subjects for these will be taken from Conrad Ferdi- 
nand Meyer's Gedichte (Leipzig, Verlag von H. Haessel). For the 
readings in German drama, the following text-books will be used: 
Friedrich Hebbel, Agnes Bernauer, edited Evans (D. C. Heath & 
Co.) ; Gerhart Hauptmann, Florian Geyer (Berlin, Verlag von S. 
Fischer) ; Gerhart Hauptmann, Das Friedensfest (Berlin, Verlag 
von S. Fischer). 

GREEK 

(See courses under Archaeology, English Literature 4, and His- 
tory 1.) 

HISTORY 

1. The History of Greece and Rome. Dr. Magoffin. 
McCoy Hall. 

This course of lectures and conferences will direct attention to 
the internal history of Greece and Rome. The archaeology and topo- 
graphy of Greece and Italy and the daily life, manners and faith of 
their peoples will be discussed in the light of the latest authoritative 
knowledge. 



131] History 19 

Text-books: There will be no prescribed text-book, but there will 
be prescribed reading from a number of specially reserved books. 

2. European History Since 1815. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. 

Beginning with a brief treatment of the reconstruction of Europe 
after the fall of Napoleon, special attention will be given to the 
development of Italian and German unity, political and economic 
reform in England, the movements leading to the present alignment 
of the powers, and the causes of the last Balkan War. 

Text-books: C. D. Hazen, "Europe Since 1815" (Holt); J. W. 
Headlam, "Bismarck" (Putnam); M. Cesaresco, " Cavour " (Mac- 
millan). Suggestions for further readings also will be made from 
time to time. (See course in Politics). 

3. American History, 1781-1801. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. 

A consideration of the " critical period," the formation of the 
Constitution and the national government, and of early constitu- 
tional interpretation. Special attention will be given to the methods 
of gathering materials for the study and teaching of American 
history. 

Text-books : J. Fiske, " The Critical Period of American History " 
(Houghton, Mifflin and Co.) ; J. S. Bassett, " The Federalist Sys- 
tem" (Harpers); F. S. Oliver, "Alexander Hamilton" (Putnam). 
Suggestions for further readings also will be made from time to 
time. 



LATIN 

1. Caesar. Dr. Magoffin. McCoy Hall. ' 

This course will cover the second year of high school Latin. In 
addition to the reading and interpretation of the text, there will be 
training in sight reading and prose composition. Especial care will 
be taken to meet the needs both of the student reading Caesar for 
the first time and of the teacher who is reviewing the subject. 

Text-books : Walker, " Caesar's Gallic War " ( Scott, Foresman and 
Co.); Pearson, "Latin Prose Composition" (American Book Co.). 

2. Horace, Odes and Epodes. Dr. Magoffin. McCoy 

Hall. 

This is designed to be a reading course in Latin Poetry, and will 
cover the equivalent of the second half-year in college Latin I. Due 
attention will be given to the study of the various Horatian metres. 

Text-book : Moore, " Horace, Odes and Epodes " ( American Book 
Co.). 



20 Summer Courses [132 



MANUAL TBAINING AND MECHANICAL DEAWING 

1. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. Pub- 

lic School No. 79. 

Construction in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, basketry, simple 
bookbinding and elementary woodwork. Representative projects in 
each will be carried out. This course includes handwork processes 
suitable for the first six years of the elementary schools. 

The course is planned to meet the needs of the regular grade 
teacher, but will also be helpful to others who wish to become 
familiar with this work as it is carried on in the elementary schools. 
The models given are such as can be easily reproduced in the regular 
classroom with a simple equipment. 

Manual training exercises suitable for rural schools, where ma- 
terials and equipment are limited, will be presented. Helpful 
models illustrating the use of the simplest materials will be em- 
ployed in demonstrations. 

For those who pursued this course in the summer session of 
1913 and desire to continue the subject, new work is offered, em- 
ploying more intricate models, with exercises in materials and 
methods. 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical work and 
study of methods. Materials at hand in the various localities and 
their value. Planning equipment and supplies. Cost. Outlines 
of course for both city and rural schools. 

Laboratory fee, $1.50. 

2. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. 

Mr. Gaither. Public School No. 79. 

This course, employing a comprehensive set of bench work 
tools, and including the elements of joinery and carpentry and 
mechanical drawing, is planned to prepare the student for teaching 
bench work in wood in the upper grades of the elementary schools 
and the lov/er grades of the secondary schools. 

The following topics will be emphasized: Practical instruction 
in the use of tools; problems involving the various processes of 
the work suggested by the teacher and carried out by the class; 
Methods of class presentation and execution; Organization, planning 
of equipment and supplies; Cost; Outline of course. 

For those who pursued this course in the summer session of 
1913 and desire to continue the subject, a special course is offered 
in advanced construction in wood, dealing mainly with projects 
in simple furniture construction, using both hard and soft woods. 
Methods of finishing and decorating will also receive attention. 

The course in Mechanical Drawing will include the proper use 
of drawing instruments, and the making and the reading of simple 
working drawings, used in connection with the course in bench work 
in wood. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. 



133] Mathernatics 21 

3 Hand- Work for Teachers of Backward and Defec- 
tive Children. Mr. Gaither. Public School No. 79. 

This course is especially designed to help those who have charge 
of backward and mentally defective children. Emphasis is laid 
upon the kind of work to be given and how to present it. The 
materials and lessons, which have been adapted successfully to the 
needs of special classes, form a natural sequence, the steps being 
arranged so as to lead the pupil in an easy manner to a gradual 
development of muscular control. Conferences, discussions and 
assigned readings form a part of this course. 

Laboratory fee, $1.50. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Algebra. Mr. Smith. Physical Laboratory. 

Beginning with quadratic equations, this course will cover Alge- 
bra (b) of the matriculation requirements. (The course is not 
open to beginners.) 

2. Trigonometry. Mr. Smith. Physical Laboratory. 

This course, which will include some preliminary practice in the 
use of logarithms, is for beginners in the subject, and is designed 
to meet the matriculation requirements. 

3. Theory and Practice of Teaching Geometry in th^: 

Secondary School. Mr. Smith. Physical Labora- 
tory. 

This course is designed for teachers in secondary schools, and pre- 
supposes a working knowledge of plane geometry. It will include 
a study of the problems relating to the aims of teaching geometry, 
the nature of the subject-matter and its relation to algebra, and an 
illustrative analysis of the best methods of working out theorems 
and exercises. Attention will also be given to the international 
reform movement and to the important recent literature. 



MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing 
a summer session of six weeks, July first to August twelfth. Its 
program includes courses in Public School Music, Normal and En- 
semble Classes, Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello and other 
subjects. 

As the buildings of the University and the Conservatory are in 



22 Summer Courses [134 

close proximity, students desiring instruction in music will find it 
convenient to arrange their courses in the two institutions. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application 
to either the University or the Conservatory. 



PHYSICS 

1. Elementary Course in General Physics. Associate 

Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of high school teachers 
of physics. Lectures, in which the more difficult parts of the sub- 
ject are emphasized, will be given and instruction in the preparation 
of simple physical apparatus will be offered. 

2. Wave Motion, Sound and Light. Associate Professor 

Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

A collegiate course of lectures and demonstrations, based on Ames, 
" General Physics." A working knowledge of algebra and trigo- 
nometry is a pre-requisite to this course. 

3. Laboratory Course : Wave Motion, Sound and Light. 

Associate Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

A laboratory course accompanying Course 2. The exercises are 
based on Ames and Bliss, " Manual of Experimental Physics." Four 
two-hour periods weekly. 

4. Mechanics and Heat. Associate Professor Pfund. 

Physical Laboratory. 

A collegiate course similar in character to Course 2. 

5. Laboratory Course : Mechanics and Heat. Associate 

Professor Pfund. Physical Laboratory. 

A laboratory course accompanying Course 4, and of the same 
character as Course 3. Four two-hour periods weekly. 

(Note. — Should there be a demand for a college laboratory course 
in Electricity and Magnetism, such a course will be offered. No 
student will be permitted to follow more than two college laboratory 
courses.) 



135] Politics 23 



POLITICS 

Constitutional Government. Assistant Professor Myers. 
McCoy Hall. 

A comparative study of national government and administration 
in the United States, England, France, Germany and Switzerland. 
This course is arranged especially to accompany the course on Euro- 
pean History Since 1815, if so desired by the student. 

Text-books : F. A. Ogg, " The Governments of Europe " ( Mac- 
millan) ; W. Wilson, ''Constitutional Government in the United 
States " ( Columbia University Press ) ; S. Low, " The Governance 
of England " ( Putnam ) . Also selected readings from W. Wilson, 
" The State" (Heath), and A. V. Dicey, " The Law of the Consti- 
tution " ( Macmillan ) . 

SPANISH 

Elementary Spanish. Dr. Soho. McCoy Hall. 

This course is intended for students who have no knowledge of 
the language. The work will consist of a study of the essentials of 
grammar, drill on pronunciation, written and oral exercises, and 
reading. 

Text-books: Ingraham-Edgren, "Brief Spanish Grammar"; 
Geddes and Josselyn, " Gil Bias " (Heath and Co.) ; Morrison, " Tres 
comedias modernas " (Holt and Co.). 



24 



Schedule 



[136 



SCHEDULE 



8.30—9.20 

Archaeology 
Domestic Science 1 

(8.30—10.20) 
Education 6 
English Composition 3 
German 3 
History 3 
Latin 1 
Manual Training 2 

(8.30—10.20) 
Mathematics 2 
Physics 2 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Domestic Science 1 

( Continued ) 
Education 3 
English Literature 2 
German 2 
History 1 
Manual Training 2 

( Continued ) 
Mathematics 1 

9.30—11.20 

Education 9 (Demonstri 
tion School) 

10.30—11.20 

Domestic Science 2 
(10.30—12.20) 
Education 1 
Education 7 
English Composition 2 
English Literature 4 
French 1 
German 1 



History 2 
Manual Training 1 
Physics 1 
Spanish 

11.30—12.20 

Chemistry 1 
Domestic Science 2 

(Continued) 
Education 4 
Education 8 
English Composition 1 
English Literature 1 
French 2 

Manual Training 3 
Politics 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Education 2 
Education 5 
English Literature 3 
French 3 
Latin 2 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 4 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 2 (Tu. Th.) 
Chemistry 3 (M. W. F.) 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemistry 4 
Chemical Laboratory 
Domestic Science 3 
Physics 3 and 5 
Psychological Laboratory 



The Johns Hopkins Press of Baltimore 

American Journal of Insanity. Board of Editors. Quarterly. 8vo. 

Volume LXX in progress. $5 per volume. 
American Journal of Mathematics. Frank Morley, Editor. Quarterly. 

4to. Volume XXXVI in progress. $5 per volume. (Foreign 

postage, fifty cents.) 
American Journal of Philology. B. L. Gildebsleeve, Editor. Quar- 
terly. 8vo. Volume XXXV in progress. $3 per volume. 

(Foreign postage, fifty cents.) 
Beitrage zur Assyriologie und semitischen Sprachwissenschaft Paul 
Haupt and Friederich Delitzsch, Editors. Volume X in prog- 
ress. 
Hesperfa: Schriften zur germanischen Philologie. Hermann 

Collitz, Editor. Six numbers have appeared. 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Bulletin. Monthly. 4to. Volume XXV in 

progress. $2 per year. (Foreign postage, fifty cents.) 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Reports. 8vo. Volume XVII in progress. 

$5 per volume. (Foreign postage, fifty cents.) 
Johns Hopkins University Circular, including the President's Report, 

Annual Register, and Medical Department Catalogue. T. R. Ball, 

Editor. Monthly. 8vo. $1 per year. 
Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. 

Under the direction of the Departments of History, Political 

Economy, and Political Science. Monthly. 8vo. Volume XXXII 

in progress. $3 per volume. 
Modern Language Notes. Edited by E. C. Armstrong, J. W. Bright, 

B. J. Vos, and C. C. Marden (Managing Editor). Eight times 

yearly. 4to. Volume XXVIII in progress. $2 per volume. 

(Foreign postage, twenty-five cents.) 
Reprint of Economic Tracts. J. H. Hollander, Editor. Third series 

in progress. $2.00. 
Reports of the Maryland Geological Survey. Edited by W. B. Clark. 
Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity. L. A. Bauer, 

Editor. Quarterly 8vo. Volume XIX in progress. $3 per 

volume. (Foreign postage, twenty-five cents.) 

Photographic Reproduction of the Kashmirian Atharva-Veda. 

M. Bloomfield, Editor. 3 vols. Folio. $50. 
Poema de Fernan Goncalez. Edited by C. Carroll Marden. 284 pp. 

8vo. $2.50 net. 
The Taill of Rauf Coilyear. Edited by William Hand Browne. 

164 pp. 8vo. $1.00 net. 
Studies in Honor of Professor Gildersleeve. 527 pp. 8vo. $6. 
Studies in Honor of A. Marshall Elliott. Two volumes. 8vo. 

450 and 334 pp. $7.50. 
The Physical Papers of Henry A. Rowland. 718 pp. 8vo. $7.50. 
The Oyster. By W. K. Brooks. 225 pp. 8vo. $1. 
Ecclesiastes : A New Metrical Translation. By Paul Haupt. 

50 pp. 8vo. 50 cents. 
The Book of Nahum: A New Metrical Translation. By Paul 

Haupt. 53 pp. 8vo. 50 cents. 
The Hague Peace Conferences of 1899 and 1907. By James Brown 

Scott. Vol. I, The Conferences, 887 pp.; Vol. II, Documents, 543 

pp. 8vo. $5. 
The Eclogues of Baptista Mantuanus. By W. P. Mustard. 158 

pp. 8vo. $1.50. 
Diplomatic Negotiations of American Naval Officers, 1778-1883. 

By C. O. Paullin. 380 pp. 12mo. $2. 
Four Phases of American Development— Federalism, Democracy, 

Imperialism, Expansion. By J. B. Moore. 218 pp. $1.50. 
A complete list of publications sent on request. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 
FOUNDED 1876 



A FACULTY OF 242 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 
(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With Academic Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



Thirty-ninth year opens October 6, 1914. For circulars, address 
T. R. BALL, Registrar 



915 No. 3 

THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

OHWERSITY OF lUUWlS LIBRARY 



< 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 5 -AUGUST 12 
1915 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

March, 1915 

New Series, 1915, No. 3] 
[Whole Number, 273] 

Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 

WIY OF ILUNofif ° mngress <* ,u,!r 16 ' lm 



T&aurarrs omcc 



N 



CALENDAR, 1915 



June 8, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



T«lv 2' w^Tv ^ 1 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration at the office 
July S; Salurd^- J of the Registrar, McCoy Hall. 

July 5, Monday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 

begins. 

July 10, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 12, Thursday— Examinations and close of Summer Courses. 



October 5, Tuesday — Fortieth regular session begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Monday morning, July 5. It is 
important that students should reach Baltimore in time to be 
present at the opening exercises in each class. Registration may 
be made by mail prior to July 5. 



SUMMER COURSES 



1915 




BALTIMORE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1915 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
SUMMER COURSES 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

FRANK J. GOODNOW, LL. D. 

President of the University 

EDWARD F. BUCHNER, Ph. D. 

Director of the Summer Courses 

THOMAS R. BALL, 
Registrar 

W. GRAHAM BOYCE, 
Treasurer 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

New Series, 1915, No. 3 MARCH, 1915 Whole Number, 273 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The fifth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns 
Hopkins University will open on Monday, July 5, and con- 
tinue until Thursday, August 12, inclusive. Exercises in 
each subject will be held every week-day, Monday to Friday. 
In addition, on Saturday, July 10, classes will meet as usual. 
Each course will consist of thirty class exercises or their 
equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will be addi- 
tional. Examinations will be held at the close of the courses. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees, 
and their credits fixed by the Boards of University and Col- 
legiate Studies, they are an integral part of the work of the 
University. All the resources of the institution essential to 
their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. These 
resources include the use not only of the academic buildings, 
but also of the general and departmental libraries, labora- 
tories, and gymnasium. 

The principal object of the University in making pro- 
vision for the summer work is to furnish instruction to 
teachers in all grades of schools, and to other persons who 
seek opportunities for instruction, with or without reference 
to an academic degree. Some courses offered are designed 
to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate students who wish 
to advance their standing or to make up deficiencies; others, 

3 



4 Summer Courses [156 

to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in part the 
entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs 
of schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which 
characterizes the work of the regular session in the subjects 
representing graduate and collegiate departments, as well as 
in those introduced to meet the special needs of teachers. In 
addition to the regular class exercises, instructors hold daily 
conferences, in which the work of the courses is supplemented 
and adapted to the particular needs of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

There will be conducted at the University during the 
session an elementary school of seven grades, designed pri- 
marily to demonstrate typical means and material for more 
effective teaching in rural schools. 

It is expected that graded vacation schools, including a 
vocational school, will be in operation in the city and avail- 
able for observation in connection with some of the work in 
the courses in education. 

Opportunity will thus be afforded superintendents, prin- 
cipals, supervisors and teachers to consider concretely many 
problems in elementary instruction. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, 
will be credited by the respective departments in accordance 
with the rule of the Board of University Studies : the require- 
ment of one of the two-years residence for this degree may be 
met by attendance and study in three sessions of the Summer 
Courses. These courses are designated by G. 



157] Admission and Attendance 5 

For the satisfactory completion of the work of any course 
of collegiate grade a credit of not more than one-half a regu- 
lar course will be allowed. These courses are designated by C. 

The exact amount of credit earned by each student will 
be determined by the instructor according to the work accom- 
plished, subject to the approval of the Director. 

Of the courses given in one summer session, collegiate 
students in this University may offer for credit not more 
than two courses. In such cases registration and attendance 
will be strictly limited to the courses so offered. 

Students not matriculated in the University may receive 
certificates of attendance and of the amount of work satis- 
factorily performed. These certificates will indicate the 
value of the work done in each course, and in most instances 
will be accepted by State, County, and City Superintendents 
and Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of 
teachers' certificates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Stu- 
dents, both men and women, will be admitted to such courses 
as they are found qualified by the respective instructors to 
pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 5, carrying out 
the schedule provided on page 3 of cover. Students are ad- 
vised to register in advance of the opening. 

The Eegistrar's office (McCoy Hall, first floor) will be 
open for registration of students on Thursday, July 1, Fri- 
day, July 2, Saturday, July 3, and Monday, July 5, from 9 
a. m. to 5 p. m. Students should register without delay. 
After July 8, admission to each course will be restricted to 
registered students. After July 12 no change of courses will 
be allowed. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately upon 
registration. 



Summer Courses [158 



LOCATION 

The University buildings are situated on Monument street 
and Druid Hill avenue, between Howard and Eutaw streets. 

By courtesy of the Baltimore Board of School Commis- 
sioners, the instruction in Domestic Science and Art and in 
Manual Training will be given in Public School No. 79, Park 
avenue and Hoffman street. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. (Under very 
exceptional circumstances, a student may register in one 
course only. The tuition fee in such cases will be $15.00). 
The fee for Playground and Recreation courses, if taken 
alone or together, or in addition to the maximum of three 
courses in other subjects, is stated on page 23. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some 
of the courses. (For details, see statement of courses). No 
reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance; nor for 
withdrawal, except on account of illness or other serious 
and unavoidable causes. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable fur- 
nished rooms in private homes in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity are offered for rent at prices ranging from $1.50 to 
$3.00 per week for a single room, and $3.00 to $7.00 a week 
for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private boarding- 
houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging from $3.50 
to $5.00 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodging 
houses will be sent upon request. 



159] Lectures and Recitals 



LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the 
opening and closing receptions, students are invited to the 
lectures and recitals which will be given every Wednesday 
afternoon and Friday evening, in co-operation with the Sum- 
mer Session of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

excursions 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State 
capital, and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride 
by trolley, and to points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE 

The University post-office, in McCoy Hall, will be open. 
Students may have their mail addressed in care of the Johns 
Hopkins University. 

SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning June 1st and extending for six weeks, the 
Medical School of the Johns Hopkins University, in co- 
operation with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, offers to gradu- 
ates in medicine courses in Medicine, Surgery and the 
various specialties as well as in several of the underlying 
scientific branches. The special circular describing these 
courses and any other information concerning them may be 
obtained by addressing the Dean of the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, Washington and Monument Sts. The fees 
vary from $25. to $125. according to the number and char- 
acter of the courses taken. 



Summer Courses [160 



INSTRUCTORS 

John August Anderson, Ph. D. Physics 

Associate Professor of Astronomy. 

Bird T. Baldwin, Ph. D. Educational Psychology 

Professor of Psychology and Education, Swarthmore College. 

Anna Brochhausen, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervising Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Director 

Professor of Education and Philosophy. 

John L. Clarke Playground and Recreation 

Field Leader, Public Athletic League, Baltimore. 

Arthur Byro^ Coble, Ph. D. Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Clarence G. Cooper, B. S. Elementary Education 

Supervisor of Rural Schools, Baltimore County, Maryland. 

Knight Dunlap, Ph.D. Psychology 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, and Supervisor of Manual Training 
Centres, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Mary E. Gross, A. B. Playground and Recreation 

Supervisor, Children's Playground Association, Baltimore. 

Gustav Grunbaum, Ph. D. French 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Clarence W. Hewlett, Ph. D. Physics 

Assistant in Physics. 

A. Grace Johnson Domestic Science 

Supervisor of Domestic Science and Art, Kokomo, Indiana. 

Alfred Allan Kern, Ph. D. English 

Professor of English, Millsaps College. 

John H. Latan£, Ph. D. History and Politics 

Professor of American History. 



161] Instructors 9 

Edith Anne Lathrop, A. B. Rural Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruction, Nebraska. 

Herbert C. Lipscomb, Ph. D. Latin and History 

Professor of Latin, Randolph-Macon Woman's College. 

Benjamin F. Lovelace, Ph. D. CJiemistry 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Wm. Starr Myers, Ph. D. History and Politics 

Assistant Professor of History and Politics, Princeton University. 

Robert L. Ramsay, Ph. D. English 

Associate Professor of English, University of Missouri. 

Robert B. Roulstox, Ph. D. German 

Associate in German. 

Grace E. Russell, B. S. Domestic Art 

Professor of Domestic Art, Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts. 

Asa A. Schaeffer, Ph. D. Biology 

Associate Professor of Zoology, University of Tennessee. 

Aristogeiton M. Soiio, Ph. D. Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish and French, Baltimore City College. 

Leonora A. Taft, A.M. Elementary Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Woodstock, Vermont. 

Henry S. West, Ph. D. Secondary Education 

Director of School Affiliation and Professor of Secondary Education, University 
of Cincinnati. 

Willis H. Wilcox, Ph. M. English 

Head of Department of English, Maryland State Normal School. 

Henry Wood, Pn. D. German 

Professor of German. 



10 Summer Courses [162 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 

1. Botany. Associate Professor Schaeffee. Biological 
Laboratory. G. 9.30 

The main part of the laboratory work will be the study of the 
life histories and structure of a liverwort, a fern, and a seed plant, 
supplemented by less detailed work upon a few other forms such 
as an alga, chara, and a moss. There will also be occasional field 
excursions for the purpose of collecting and identifying about fifty 
plants representing the main divisions of the plant kingdom. The 
lectures will deal with the more essential facts of the morphology 
and physiology of plants. 

2. Zoology. Associate Professor Schaeffee. Biological 

Laboratory. C. 12.30 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a rather intensive 
study of such representative animals as amoeba, hydra, an earth- 
worm, a crayfish and a frog. The behavior of these animals as 
well as their structure will be studied. In addition to this work 
there will be occasional field excursions to streams, forests, and 
open fields, for the purpose of becoming better acquainted with the 
habitats of animals. The lectures will supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures will be devoted 
to the more general problems of zoological science. 

Laboratory fee: $1.00 for one, or both courses. 

CHEMISTEY 

1. Oeganic Chemistey. Professor Gilpin. Chemical 
Laboratory. G. 12.30 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough train- 
ing in inorganic chemistry and will be suited to the needs of gradu- 
ate students in chemistry and those who wish to prepare for entrance 
to the Medical School. 

Text-books: Kemsen, "Organic Chemistry" (Heath & Co.), and 
Norris, "Organic Chemistry" (McGraw, Hill Book Co.). 

2. The Peinciples of Analytical Chemistey. Associate 
Professor Lovelace. Chemical Laboratory. G. 8.30 

A course of lectures for advanced students. 



163] Domestic Science and AH 11 

3. Inorganic Reactions and Inorganic Preparations. 
Associate Professor Lovelace. Chemical Laboratory. 
G. 1.30-4.20 

A laboratory course. 

4. Quantitative Analysis. Associate Professor Lovelace. 
Chemical Laboratory. G. 9.30-12.20 

A laboratory course. 

5. Household Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. Chemical 

Laboratory. C. 1.30 

This course is intended for those who have taken courses in ele- 
mentary chemistry and domestic science. Two lectures each week 
will be devoted to a study of fuels, combustion, oxidation, air, 
water (its analysis and purification), food principles, preparation 
and testing of food and preservatives. 

Three lectures each week will be given to a discussion of the 
principles of organic chemistry, and the preparation and properties 
of organic compounds, with special reference to the reactions and 
substances which have a bearing on household chemistry. 

Text-book: Remsen, "Organic Chemistry" (Heath & Co.). 

6. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gil- 

pin. Chemical Laboratory. C. 11.30 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. 
It will include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of 
the more important non-metallic and metallic elements and their 
properties. Remsen'3 "Chemistry" (Briefer Course) will be used 
as a basis for the classroom and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fees: $5.00 for one course, or for morning or after- 
noon work; $8.00 for two courses, or for work all day. (The fee 
for materials does not include the cost of small pieces of apparatus 
not returnable and the charge for breakage to be paid at the close 
of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00.) 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE AND ART 

1. Elementary Cookery. Miss Johnson. Public School 
No. 79. C. 8.30-10.20 

The purpose of this course is to give a working knowledge of 
the elementary principles of cookery. The course will deal with 
food preparation based on a knowledge of the composition of foods, 
and the chemical changes produced by heat and moisture; utensils, 
apparatus, weights, measures and fuel will be studied. Planning 
and serving of simple meals are included in this course. 

Prerequisite or Parallel: — Chemistry 1. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 



12 Summer Courses [164 

2. Advanced Cookery. Miss Johnson. Public School 
No. 79. C. 10.30-12.20 

The purpose of this course is to give more advanced work in 
food preparation. Preservation of fruits and vegetables by pre- 
serving, canning and jelly making will be given. 

Comparative food values and cost of materials involved will be 
studied. Special attention will be given to planning of meals under 
varying conditions. There will be demonstrations in the planning 
and serving of breakfast, dinner and supper. 

Prerequisite: Course 1, or its equivalent. 

Parallel: — Chemistry 5. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

3. Methods of Teaching Domestic Science. Miss 
Johnson. Public School No. 79. C. 12.30 

This course deals with the problems of teaching Domestic Science. 
The educational value, the place in curriculum, equipment for 
teaching, planning of lessons and methods of presenting work will 
be considered. Opportunity will be given for practice teaching in 
Domestic Science. 

This course is open to all former students of Domestic Science 
and to new students who have had the equivalent of Course 1. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

-L Elementary Clothing and Hand Work. Professor 
Eussell. Public School No. 79. C. 1.30-4.20 

This course will include practice in hand and machine sewing, 
making fundamental stitches, drafting, altering and use of patterns, 
garment making, and simple embroidery. Students provide material 
approved by the instructor — approximate cost, $5.00. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

5. Drafting, Draping and Costume Design. Professor 
Eussell. Public School No. 79. C. 8.30-11.20 

This course, designed to meet the needs of high and normal school 
teachers, will provide practice in drafting, cutting, fitting and design- 
ing patterns, draping on the form without pattern, and offers oppor- 
tunity for a study of color harmony in costumes. Individual dress- 
making projects may be undertaken. Students provide material 
approved by the instructor, the cost to be determined individually. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 



165] Education 13 



EDUCATION 

1. The Administration of Secondary Education. Pro- 
fessor West. McCoy Hall. Q. 8.30 

This course will consider secondary school problems from the 
view point of the superintendent, principal, supervisor, and the 
graduate student and teacher preparing to become executives. Lec- 
tures, readings and assignment of special problems. 

Text-books : " Principles of Secondary Education," Monroe 
(Macmillan) ; "Administration of Public Education," Dutton and 
Snedden ( Macmillan ) . 

2. Adolescence. Professor Baldwin. McCoy Hall. G. 

9.30 

This course in educational psychology will deal with the develop- 
ment of physical and mental traits, and individual differences during 
adolescence, including such topics as physiological age, social and 
individualistic instincts, juvenile delinquency and vocational guid- 
ance. Lectures, readings, reports, and assignment of a problem to 
each student. 

3. Secondary School Teaching. Professor West. 
McCoy Hall. G. 10.30 

In considering the problems of secondary school teaching, attention 
will be given to such topics as educational values, purposes of the 
recitation, types of teaching, organization of subject-matter and 
planning lessons, and demonstration of results. 

Text-book: "Teaching in High Schools," Parker (Ginn & Co.). 

4. Principles of Education. Professor Baldwin. McCoy 
Hall. G and C. 12.30 

A study of the principles underlying the science and practice of 
education will be the purpose of this course. Supplementary to 
the text, it will include an analysis of the learning process and a 
summary of the results of type studies in experimental education, 
illustrated by class demonstrations and experiments. 

Text-book: "'Principles of Education," Ruediger (Houghton- 
Mifflin Co.) 

5. The Elementary School: Grammar Grades. Miss 
Taft. McCoy Hall. C. 11.30 

This course will present the theory and practice of teaching in 
the grades from the fourth to the eighth, inclusive. Emphasis will 
be placed on the characteristics of pupils as they change from 
grade to grade; the adaptation of methods to these changes; the 



14 Summer Courses [166 

specific and difficult problems of the course of study; the needs of 
the varying individualities of grammar grade pupils. Attention will 
be given to the present vocational trend in elementary education. 
Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

6. The Elementary School: Primary Grades. Miss 

Brochhatjsen. McCoy Hall. C. 12.30 

By means of lectures and discussions this course will consider the 
problems peculiar to the first, second, and third grades of the 
elementary school. The subject matter for each grade will be out- 
lined, and effective methods for presenting the material will be given. 
Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

7. The Teaching of English and History in the Ele- 
mentary School. Miss Brochhausen. McCoy Hall. 
C. 8.30 

The first part of this course of lectures, reports, and discussions 
will be devoted to the teaching of English in the eight grades of 
the elementary school. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
teaching of oral and written composition, the correlation between 
composition and literature, and the relation of spelling and grammar 
to composition. It will be shown how composition can be kept 
interesting and made vital to children. The second half of the 
course will be devoted to the subject-matter of history and the prob- 
lems of teaching it in the elementary school. 

8. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Geography in the 

Elementary School. Miss Taft. McCoy Hall. C. 
10.30 

The first half of this course will be devoted to the teaching of 
arithmetic throughout the eight grades of the elementary school. 

The second half of the course will give attention to the subject 
matter of geography and to methods of teaching it so as to develop 
its relations to nature study and agriculture. 

Outside reading and written reports will be required. 

9. Rural School Problems. Miss Lathrop. McCoy 

Hall. C. 11.30 

In this course an opportunity will be given for a discussion of the 
principles illustrated in the demonstration school. The prime need 
of a thorough organization of the rural school will be emphasized. 
In this connection it will be shown how many problems of discipline 
can be avoided by thorough organization. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the necessity of preparation of lessons on the part of the rural 
teacher; and the advantages of keeping daily plan books will be 
discussed. In the introduction of vocational subjects into the 
course of study an attempt will be made to show how the life of 
the school may be made to respond to the life of the community. 



167] English Composition 15 

10. A Demonstration School: Observation Course. 
Miss Lathrop. McCoy Hall. C. 9.30-11.20 

The purpose of this school will be to illustrate by the laboratory 
method the organization of a rural school showing the alternation 
and combination of subjects and grades. Illustrative lessons will 
also be given in the subjects outlined in the state course of study. 
In these model lessons emphasis will be placed upon the correlation 
and vitalization of material. Attention will be given to seat work 
practicable in a rural school. In short, the aim will be an attempt 
to solve the problems that arise in a one-teacher rural school. 

The tuition fee for Course 10 alone is $25.00. 

11. The Principles of Elementary Teaching. Mr. 
Cooper. McCoy Hall. 8.30 

This course will study the principles of teaching in their applica- 
tion to the state elementary course of study, including special 
methods in teaching the various subjects throughout the grades. 
Review of subject-matter will be made wherever necessary. The 
course will be based on the Maryland Teachers' Manual and Course 
of Study (issued in 1914), and is especially designed, in connection 
with Course 12, to meet the new legal requirement of persons wishing 
to secure the minimum preparation for teaching. 

12. School Management and School Law. Mr. Cooper. 
McCoy Hall. 12.30 

In close connection with Course 11, the problems of the organi- 
zation of a school, program making, class and pupil management, 
text-books, supplies and apparatus, care and supervision of school 
property, the legal duties of teachers, trustees and school boards, 
as officers of the state ; contracts, records and reports will be studied 
so as to meet the needs of inexperienced teachers. The work will be 
based on the Maryland School Law and Elementary Course of Study. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Description and Narration. Associate Professor Kam- 

say. McCoy Hall. C. 10.30 

An advanced composition course in the imaginative forms of 
writing, including especially the photo-play, the one-act drama, 
the tale, and the modern short story. There will be regular practice 
in writing these forms, in connection with the reading and study 
of selected models, and conferences for criticism. 

2. Expository Writing. Associate Professor Kamsay. 

McCoy Hall. C. 8.30 

A course in the theory and practice of various kinds of composi- 
tion, dealing chiefly with the construction and organization of ex- 



16 Summer Courses [168 

pository writing. Exercises in logical analysis and critical study 
of specimens of current exposition. Of the same grade as the first 
college year. 

3. Sentence and Paragraph Structure. Mr. Wilcox. 
McCoy Hall. 12.30 

Such subjects as the forms of sentence and paragraph structure 
will be studied through the use of models, with constant practice 
in composition. This work will be accompanied by class criticisms 
and personal conference. 

4. Elements of English Composition. Mr. Wilcox. 

McCoy Hall. 11.30 

This course is planned for teachers who feel the need of more 
training in the fundamental principles of composition. These prin- 
ciples will be studied and applied in actual composition. Written 
work will be required throughout the course, accompanied by class 
criticism and personal conferences. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. English Literary Movements of the Present. Asso- 

ciate Professor Ramsey. McCoy Hall. G. 11.30. 

A study of some representative writers of the last twenty-five 
years, with particular attention to the two conflicting literary move- 
ments of imperialism and nationalism or regionalism as they have 
found expression in recent English poetry and fiction. A consid- 
erable amount of parallel reading will be required, with short papers 
based upon it. Those who desire to obtain graduate credit for the 
course may do so by writing a special assigned essay. 

2. The Poems and Dramas of Tennyson. Professor 

Kern. McCoy Hall. G. 12.30 

The purpose of this course will be to study Tennyson as the 
supreme representative of the Victorian era. Parallel work will 
be assigned in Harold and Becket. Poetical Works of Tennyson 
(Globe or Cambridge edition). 

3. The Poems and Dramas of Browning. Professor 
Kern. McCoy Hall. 0. 9.30 

A study of the message of Browning as revealed in certain of 
his poems. Parallel work will be assigned in A Blot in the 'Scut- 
cheon and in Colombe's Birthday. Poetical Works of Robert Brown- 
ing (Globe or Cambridge edition). 



169] French 17 



4. Anglo-Saxon. Professor Kern. McCoy Hall. G. 8.30 

A course in Anglo-Saxon grammar, followed by the translation of 
selections from Anglo-Saxon prose and poetry. The relation of mod- 
ern English grammar to that of Anglo-Saxon will be stressed. 

Text-book: "An Anglo-Saxon Reader," Bright (Holt, 1913). 

(If circumstances warrant, a study of Cynewulf and his School, 
including a reading of the Andreas and the Elene, may be sub- 
stituted.) 



FRENCH 

1. French Romanticism. Dr. Grunbaum. McCoy Hall. 
C. 12.30 

Students entering this course are supposed to have an accurate 
knowledge of the essentials of French grammar and the ability to 
read simple French without difficulty. The minimum of prepara- 
tion for entrance is the work outlined for Courses 2 and 3. Work 
in composition will accompany the reading of texts. 

Text-books: Chateaubriand, Atala (Heath & Co.); Hugo, Hernani 
(American Book Co.) ; Hugo, Quatre-vingt-treize (Heath & Co.) ; 
Lamartine, Graziella (Heath & Co.) ; Musset, Trois comedies (Heath 
& Co.); Canfield, French Lyrics (Holt & Co.); Comfort, French 
Prose Composition (Heath & Co.). 



2. Readings in French. Dr. Grunbaum. McCoy Hall. 
C. 11.30 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent 
of Course 3 in whole or in part. 

Text-books: Pailleron, Le Monde ou Von s'ennuie (Ginn & Co.) ; 
Merimee, Colombo, (Ginn & Co.) ; Maupassant, Ten Short Stories 
(Ginn & Co.) ; Bouvet, French Syntax and Composition (Heath & 
Co.). 



3. Elementary French. Dr. Grunbaum. McCoy Hall. 
10.30 

The work will consist of a study of the essentials of grammar, 
drill on pronunciation, practice in writing, and careful reading of 
texts. 

Text-books: Aldrich and Foster, Foundations of French (Ginn & 
Co.) ; Bruno, Le Tour de la France (Holt & Co.) ; About, La Mire de 
la Marquise (Heath & Co.). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfilment of the entrance requirements in French. 



18 Summer Courses [170 



GEKMAN 

1. Goethe's and Schiller's Later Classical Dramas. 
Professor Wood. McCoy Hall. G. 10.30 

Special emphasis will be given to the development of the modern 
and the romantic elements. Students are requested to procure 
Goethe's Werke, Jubilaums-Ausgabe, Vols. 9 and 12; Schiller's 
Werke, Sakular-Ausgabe, Vols. 6, 7, 8. 

2. Origin and Development of Modern German. Pro- 
fessor Wood. McCoy Hall. G. 8.30 

Students are requested to procure 0. Behagel, Die Deutsche 
Sprache, Wien und Leipzig; F. Kluge, Unser Deutsch, 3. Auflage, 
Leipzig, 1914. 

3. Advanced German. Dr. Koulston. McCoy Hall. G. 
and C. 9.30 

This course will presuppose considerable facility in reading Ger- 
man. The works of Conrad Ferdinand Meyer will form the basis 
of study. Students intending to enter the course should procure 
Meyer's "Werke" (Leipzig, Haessel, 9 Bande) and should famil- 
iarize themselves at least with the " Gedichte," " Jurg Jenatsch," 
" Der Heilige," and several of the " Novellen." One essay will be 
required of each member of the class. Supplementary work required 
for graduate credit. 

4. Headings in German. Dr. Eoulston. McCoy Hall. C. 
8.30 

Intended for those who already have some knowledge of the 
language. 

Text-books: Raabe, Eulenpfingsten, edited Lambert (Heath & 
Co.); Stern, Die Wiedertaufer, edited Sturm (Heath & Co.); 
Stifter, Brigitta, edited Crowell (Oxford German Series). 

Prose composition: Whitney and 'Stroebe, Easy German Com- 
position (Holt & Co.) 

5. Elementary German. Dr. Eoulston. McCoy Hall. 
10.30 

In this course emphasis will be laid primarily upon the grammar 
of the language. It will meet the needs of those beginning the 
language and of such as desire a thorough review in the grammar. 

Text-book: Vos, "Essentials of German," 4th edition, 1914 
(Holt & Co.) 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfillment of the entrance requirements in German. 



171] History 19 



HISTORY 

1. Latin- American History and Diplomacy. Professor 
Latane. McCoy Hall. 0. 11.30 

The Spanish colonial system, causes of the revolt, recognition of 
the new republics by the United States and England, the formula- 
tion of the Monroe Doctrine, its applications and development, 
political history of the Latin-American countries, commercial and 
financal relations with Europe, Pan- Americanism, the ABC policy, 
and the advance of the United States in the Caribbean. 

2. American History, 1820-1860. Professor Latane. 

McCoy Hall. G. 10.30 

The political, diplomatic, and economic history of the United 
States from the Missouri Compromise to the beginning of the Civil 
War. A study of the sources as well as of the standard authori- 
ties will be required. 

3. American History, 1781-1801. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. G and C. 8.30 

A consideration of the " critical period," the formation of the 
Constitution and the national government, and of early constitu- 
tional interpretation. Special attention will be given to the meth- 
ods of gathering materials for the study and teaching of American 
history. 

Text-books : J. Fiske, " The Critical Period of American History " 
(Houghton, Mifflin and Co.); J. S. Bassett, "The Federalist Sys- 
tem " ( Harpers ) ; F. S. Oliver, " Alexander Hamilton " ( Putnam ) . 
Suggestions for further readings also will be made from time to 
time. 



4. English History, 1485-1688. Assistant Professor 

Myers. McCoy Hall. C. 10.30 

A study of the Tudor and Stuart periods. 

Text-books: A. L. Cross, "A History of England and Greater 
Britain" (Macmillan) ; A. F. Pollard, "Henry VIII" (Longmans). 
Selections for further reading also will be assigned from time to 
time. 

5. Eoman History. Professor Lipscomb. McCoy Hall. C. 

9.30 

A survey of Roman history from the beginning to the fall of the 
Western Empire. Emphasis will be laid upon the development of 



20 Summer Courses [172 

the Roman constitution and upon the social life of the late Republic 
and early Empire. Lectures, recitations, private reading. 

Text-books: Webster, "Ancient History" (Heath & Co.); Web- 
ster, "Reading in Ancient History" (Heath & Co.). McKinley's 
" Illustrated Topics for Ancient History " will also be used. 

LATIN 

1. Tacitus, Annals. Prof essor Lipscomb. McCoy Hall. C. 
12.30 

A study of the reign of Tiberius. There will be discussions of 
Tacitus as a historian and representative of " Silver " Latin. This 
course will cover the equivalent of the first half-year in college 
Latin II. 

Text-book: Allen, "The Annals of Tacitus, Books I -VI " (Ginn 
& Co.). 

2. Cicero. Professor Lipscomb. McCoy Hall. 8.30 

This course will cover the third year of high school Latin. In 
addition to the reading and interpretation of the text, there will be 
training in sight reading and prose composition. Special attention 
will be given to the study of Cicero's life and times. Selections from 
the Letters will be read along with the Orations. 

Text-books : Johnston and Kingery, " Cicero's Orations and Let- 
ters " ( Scott, Foresman & Co. ) ; Kirtland, " Selections from the 
Correspondence of Cicero" (American Book Co.); Pearson, "Latin 
Prose Composition" (American Book Co.). 



MANUAL TKAINING 

1. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. Pub- 
lic School No. 79. C. 10.30 

This course includes handwork processes in paper, cardboard, 
weaving, raffia, basketry, bookbinding and woodwork suitable for 
the first six years of the elementary schools, and in materials suit- 
able for rural schools. Outlining courses, planning equipment, and 
study of methods will be considered. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders 
will find this course adapted to meet their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $1.50. 

2. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. 

Mr. Gaither. Public School No. 79. C. 8.30-10.20 

This course includes the theory and practice in teaching the use 
of tools and bench work in wood in the upper elementary and lower 
secondary grades, the use of drawing instruments and making sim- 
ple working drawings, outlining courses, planning equipment, and 



173] Mathematics 21 

methods of individual and class exercise. Advanced construction in 
both hard and soft woods will be available for advanced students. 
Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

3. Hand- Work for Teachers of Backward and Defec- 
tive Children. Mr. Gaither, Public School No. 
79. C. 11.30 

This course presents for the aid of special teachers manual activi- 
ties adapted to the needs of backward and mentally defective chil- 
dren. The materials and lessons form a natural sequence, the steps 
being arranged so as to lead the pupil in an easy manner to a grad- 
ual development of muscular control. Conferences and assigned 
readings. 

Laboratory fee: $1.50. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Theory of Groups. Associate Professor Coble. Phy- 
sical Laboratory. G. 8.30. 

This course will deal mainly with finite groups. A definite appli- 
cation, possibly to the theory of equations or to finite geometry, will 
be made. 

(a) Alternate subject: Elliptic Functions. 

2. Theory of Functions of a Keal Variable. Associate 

Professor Coble. Physical Laboratory. G. 10.30 

(a) Alternate subject: Projective Geometry. 

(Pre-requisites: For 1 and 2, Calculus, and for la, a knowledge of 
at least the elements of the theory of functions of a complex 
variable.) 

3. The Elements of Analytic Geometry and Graph- 
ical Algebra. Associate Professor Coble. Physical 
Laboratory. (7. 11.30 

This course will cover part of the required work of the first college 
year. 

4. The Essentials of Geometry and Algebra. Associate 

Professor Coble. Physical Laboratory. 12.30 

This course will be devoted to a comparative survey of current 
elementary texts with an evaluation of their content and methods 
with reference to mathematical science as opposed to logic. It is 
designed to meet the needs of teachers of these subjects and also of 
students who want a rapid review. 



22 Summer Courses [174 



MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing 
a summer session of six weeks, July first to August twelfth. Its 
program includes courses in Rhythmic Gymnastics, Normal and En- 
semble Classes, Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello, Composition, 
and other subjects. 

As the buildings of the University and the Conservatory are in 
close proximity, students desiring instruction in music will find it 
convenient to arrange their courses in the two institutions. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application 
to either the University or the Conservatory. 



PHYSICS 

1. Spectroscopy. Associate Professor Anderson. Physi- 
cal Laboratory. G. 12.30 

(a) Alternate: Astrophysics. 

2. Theoretical Mechanics. Associate Professor Ander- 
son. Physical Laboratory. G. 9.30 

(a) Alternate: Theory of Sound. 

3. Electron Theory. Associate Professor Anderson. 
Physical Laboratory. G. 11.30 

4. Mechanics and Heat. Dr. Hewlett. C. 8.30 
Lectures and Laboratory. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. Dr. Hewlett. C. 11.30 
Lectures and Laboratory. 

6. Teachers 5 Course in Physics. Associate Professor 
Anderson and Dr. Hewlett. 10.30 

An elementary course designed especially for teachers in High 
Schools. The construction of simple apparatus will be taught in 
connection with this course. 

Laboratory fee: $4.00, each, for courses 1, 2, and 3. 



175] Politics 23 



PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION 

The following courses for the training of leaders in play- 
ground and recreation work are offered in cooperation with 
the Children's Playground Association of Baltimore, Inc. 
Additional training for this purpose is offered in Manual 
Training 1. 

1. Singing Games and Folk Dances. Miss Gross. Mc- 
Coy Hall. 4.30-6.00 

The development of traditional singing games for younger chil- 
dren, national folk dances and English country dances suitable for 
school and recreation purposes. 

2. Athletic Games and Standardized Team Games. Mr. 

Clarke. Gymnasium. 4.30-6.00 

Typical games suitable for gymnasium and playground for chil- 
dren from ten to eighteen years. 

Tuition fee: For either course alone, $10.00; for both courses, 
$15.00; for either course as a fourth course, $5.00 in addition to the 
regular tuition. A minimum registration of ten is required for 
each course. The schedule may be changed. 

POLITICS 

1. International Law. Professor Latane. McCoy 
Hall. G. 8.30 

The nature and sanction of international law, the attributes of 
sovereign states, their rights and duties as members of the family 
of nations in peace, in war, and in the relation of neutrality. 

2. American Party Government. Assistant Professor 
Myers. McCoy Hall. C. 9.30 

A study of the history and practice of political parties in the 
United States from early times to the present day. Lectures and 
assigned readings. 

Text-books: P. O. Ray, "An Introduction to Political Parties 
and Practical Politics" (Scribner's) ; S. W. McCall, "The Business 
of Congress" (Columbia University Press) ; H. J. Ford, "The Rise 
and Growth of American Politics" (Macmillan). 



21 Summer Courses [176 



PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Advanced General Psychology. Associate Professor 
Dunlap. Psychological Laboratory. G. 11.30 

This course is intended for students who wish to make a critical 
and intensive study of methods and results in normal human psy- 
chology. The work will have especial reference to important theories 
and modern view-points. Lectures, readings and discussion. 

2. Experimental Psychology. Associate Professor Dun- 
lap. Psychological Laboratory. G. 12.30 

In this course special attention will be given to methods of re- 
research and the collation of results in various lines of psychological 
investigation. Laboratory work and conferences. 

3. Introduction to General Psychology. Associate Pro- 
fessor Dunlap. Psychological Laboratory. G. 8.30 

This course is intended for those who have had no training in psy- 
chology, or who wish to review the elementary work. The essential 
facts and principles of analytical and functional psychology will be 
outlined in lectures, with demonstrations, supplemented by assigned 
reading. 



SPANISH 

1. Headings in Spanish. Dr. Soho. McCoy Hall. C. 
9.30 

Olmsted and Gordon, Abridged Spanish Grammar; Perez Galdos, 

Dona Perfecta; Larra, Partir a tiempo. Oral and written exercises. 

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of Spanish 2. 

2. Elementary Spanish. Dr. Soho. McCoy Hall. C. 
10.30 

This course on written and spoken Spanish will include drill on 
pronunciation, the essentials of grammar, composition and reading. 

Text-books: Ingraham-Edgren, "Brief 'Spanish Grammar"; 
Geddes and Josselyn, "Gil Bias" (Heath & Co.); Morrison, " Tres 
comedias modernas " (Holt & Co.). 



SCHEDULE 



8.30—9.20 

Chemistry 2 
Domestic Science-Art 1 

(8.30—10.20) 
Domestic Science-Art 5 

(8.30—11.20) 
Education 1 
Education 7 
Education 11 
English Composition 2 
English Literature 4 
German 2 
German 4 
History 3 
Latin 2 
Manual Training 2 

(8.30—10.20) 
Mathematics 1 
Physics 4 
Politics 1 
Psychology 3 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Chemistry 4 

(9.30—12.20) 
Education 2 
English Literature 3 
German 3 
History 5 
Physics 2 
Politics 2 
Spanish 1 

9.30—11.20 

Education 10 

(Demonstration School) 

10.30—11.20 

Domestic Science-Art 2 

(10.30—12.20) 
Education 3 
Education 8 
English Composition 1 
French 3 
German 1 
German 5 
History 2 
History 4 
Manual Training 1 



Mathematics 2 
Physics 6 
Spanish 2 

11.30—12.20 

Chemistry 6 
Education 5 
Education 9 
English Composition 4 
English Literature 1 
French 2 
History 1 
Manual Training 3 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 3 
Physics 5 
Psychology 1 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Chemistry 1 
Domestic Science- Art 3 
Education 4 
Education 6 
Education 12 
English Composition 3 
English Literature 2 
French 1 
Latin 1 
Mathematics 4 
Physics 1 
Psychology 2 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 3 

(1.30—4.20) 
Chemistry 5 
Domestic Science-Art 4 
(1.30—4.20) 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Physical Laboratory 
Psychological Laboratory 

4.30—6.00 

Playground-Recreation 1 
Playground-Recreation 2 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 
FOUNDED 1876 



A FACULTY OF 250 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 
Degree B. S. 
(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

With A. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M. and A. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 
Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 
Maryland Forestry Bureau 



Thirty-ninth year opens October 5, 1915. For circulars, Rt»tui 
T. R. BALL, Registrar 



J 



No. 3 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 5 -AUGUST 15 
1916 



Baltimobe, Maryland 

Published by the Uniyebsity 

Issued Monthly fboh Ootobeb to July 

Mabch, 1916 



few Series, 1916, No. 3] 
[Whole Number, 283] 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



M\\] 



CALENDAR, 1916 



June 6, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



July 1, Saturday — ) 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration at the office 
July 3, Monday — j" of the Registrar, McCoy Hall. 

July 4, Tuesday — Independence Day: University buildings closed. 

July 5, Wednesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 

begins. 

July 15, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 15, Tuesday — Examinations and close of Summer Courses. 



October 3, Tuesday — Forty-first regular session begins. 

October 7, Saturday — Opening Assembly, College Courses for Teachers. 



All work will begin promptly on Wednesday morning, July 6. It is 
important that students should reach Baltimore in time to be 
present at the opening exercises in each class. 

Registration should be made prior to July 5. 



SUMMER COURSES 



1916 




BALTIMORE 

The Johns Hopkins Press 

1916 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 
SUMMER COURSES 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

FRANK J. GOODNOW, LL. D. 
President of the University 

EDWARD F. BUCHNER, Ph.D. 

Director of the Summer Courses 

THOMAS R. BALL, 
Registrar 

W. GRAHAM BOYCE, 

Treasurer 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

New Series, 1916, No. 3 MARCH, 1916 Whole Number, 283 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The sixth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns 
Hopkins University will open on Wednesday, July 5, and con- 
tinue until Tuesday, August 15/ inclusive. Exercises in 
each subject will be held every week-day, Monday to Friday. 
In addition, on Saturday, July 15, classes will meet as usual. 
Each course will consist of thirty class exercises or their 
equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will be addi- 
tional. Examinations will be held at the close of the courses. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees, and 
their credits fixed by the various Boards of study, they are 
an integral part of the work of the University. All the re- 
sources of the institution essential to their conduct are placed 
at the disposal of the students. These resources include the 
use not only of the academic buildings, but also of the gen- 
eral and departmental libraries, laboratories, and gymnasium. 

The principal object of the University in making pro- 
vision for the summer work is to furnish instruction to 
teachers in all grades of schools, and to other persons who 
seek opportunities for instruction, with or without reference 
to an academic degree. Some courses offered are designed 
to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate students who wish 
to advance their standing or to make up deficiencies; others, 
to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in part the 

3 



4 Summer Courses [214 

entrance requirements. Also, courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs 
of schools. 

CHAEACTEK OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which 
characterizes the work of the regular session in the subjects 
representing graduate and collegiate departments, as well as 
in those introduced to meet the special needs of teachers. In 
addition to the regular class exercises, instructors hold daily 
conferences, in which the work of the courses is supplemented 
and adapted to the particular needs of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

There will be conducted at the University during the 
session an elementary school of seven grades, designed pri- 
marily to demonstrate typical means and material for more 
effective teaching in rural schools. 

It is expected that graded vacation schools, including a 
vocational school, will be in operation in the city and avail- 
able for observation in connection with some of the work in 
the courses in education. 

Opportunity will thus be afforded superintendents, prin- 
cipals, supervisors and teachers to consider concretely many 
problems in elementary instruction. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, 
will be credited by the respective departments in accordance 
with the rule of the Board of University Studies : the require- 
ment of one of the two-years residence for this degree may be 
met by attendance and study in three sessions of the Summer 
Courses. These courses are designated by G. 

Students matriculated in the University will receive credit 
for the satisfactory completion of those courses designated by 






215] Admission and Attendance 5 

C. In general the same credit is given per hour as in the 
regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty hours 
has a credit of two " points/' or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Pro- 
vided, however, the student follows but two courses, an addi- 
tional credit may be given. The exact amount of additional 
credit in each course is determined by the instructor according 
to the work accomplished, subject to the approval of the 
Director, but in no case will an additional credit to exceed 
fifty per cent, be given, nor can a total credit of more than 
eight points be allowed a student in one summer session. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive 
certificates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily per- 
formed. These certificates will indicate the value of the work 
done in each course, and in most instances will be accepted by 
State, County, and City Superintendents and Boards of Ex- 
aminers in the extension or renewal of teachers' certificates, 
according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Stu- 
dents, both men and women, will be admitted to such courses 
as they are found qualified by the respective instructors to 
pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 5, carrying out 
the schedule provided on page 3 of cover. Students are ad- 
vised to register in advance of the opening. 

The Eegistrar's office (McCoy Hall, first floor) will be 
open for registration of students on Saturday, July 1, Mon- 
day, July 3, and Wednesday, July 5, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
Students should register without delay. After July 11, ad- 
mission to each course will be restricted to registered students. 
After July 13 no change of courses will be allowed. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately upon 
registration. 



Summer Courses [216 



LOCATION 

The University buildings are situated on Monument street 
and Druid Hill avenue, between Howard and Eutaw streets. 

By courtesy of the Baltimore Board of School Commis- 
sioners, the instruction in Domestic Science and Art and in 
Manual Training will be given in Public School No. 79, Park 
avenue and Hoffman street. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three - courses. (Under very 
exceptional circumstances, a student may register in one 
course only. The tuition fee in such cases will be $15.00.) 
The fee for the Playground and Eecreation course, if taken 
alone, or in addition to the maximum of three courses in 
other subjects, is stated on page 23. The fee for the use 
of the gymnasium, including towel service, or for the use 
of the tennis courts at Homewood, is $2.00 ; for both, $3.00. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some of 
the courses. (For details, see statement of courses.) ISTo 
reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance; nor for 
withdrawal, except on account of illness. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn for 
the exact amount to the order of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. For the convenience of students while in residence 
at the University, the Treasurer will receive out-of-town 
checks and drafts for payment upon collection. There is no 
charge for this service other than the exchange. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable fur- 
nished rooms in private homes in the vicinity of the Uni- 
versity are offered for rent at prices ranging from $1.50 to 



217] Recitals and Excursions 7 

$3.00 per week for a single room, and $3.00 to $7.00 a week 
for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private boarding- 
houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging from $3.50 
to $5.00 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodging 
houses will be sent upon request. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the 
opening and closing receptions, students are invited to the 
lectures and recitals which will be given every Wednesday 
afternoon and Friday evening, in co-operation with the Sum- 
mer Session of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State 
capital, and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride 
by trolley, and to points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE 

The University post-office, in McCoy Hall, will be open. 
Students may have their mail addressed in care of the Johns 
Hopkins University. 

SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning June 1st and extending for six weeks, the 
Medical School of the Johns Hopkins University, in co- 
operation with the Johns Hopkins Hospital, offers to gradu- 
ates in medicine courses in Medicine, Surgery, and the 
various specialties. The special circular describing these 
courses and any other information concerning them may be 
obtained by addressing the Dean of the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School, Washington and Monument Sts. The fees 
vary from $25. to $125. according to the number and char- 
acter of the courses taken. 



Summer Courses [218 



INSTRUCTORS 

Joseph S. Ames, Ph. D. Physics 

Professor of Physics. 

Edna I. Avery, A. M. Domestic Art 

Instructor in Home Economics, New York State College for Teachers. 

Bied T. Baldwin, Ph. D. Educational Psychology 

Professor of Psychology and Education, Swarthmore College. 

Anna Brochhausen, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervising Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Director 

Professor of Education. 

Arthur B. Coble, Ph. D. Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Clarence G. Cooper, S. B. Elementary and Rural Education 

Supervisor of Rural Schools, Baltimore County, Maryland. 

Robert T. Crane, Ph. D. Politics and History 

Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan. 

Knight Dunlap, Ph. D. Psychology 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Howard E. Enders, Ph. D. Biology 

Associate Professor of Zoology and Head of General Biology, Purdue University. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Instructor, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, and Supervisor of Manual Train- 
ing Centres, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Robert M. Gay, A. M. English 

Professor of English, Goucher College. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Greta Gray, A. M. Domestic Science 

Instructor in Household Science, University of Illinois. 

Mary E. Gross, A. M. Playground and Recreation 

Assistant to Field Secretary, Children's Playground Association, Baltimore. 

Gustav Gruenbaum, Ph. D. French 

Formerly Instructor in Romance Languages. 



219] Instructors 9 

William J. Holloway, A. M. Elementary Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Wicomico County, Maryland. 

Alfred A. Kern, Ph. D. English 

Professor of English, Millsaps College. 

Edith A. Lathrop, A. B. Rural Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruction, Nebraska. 

Arby P. Leland, Ph. D. Elementary Education 

Elementary Principal, New York City Public Schools. 

Herbert C. Lipscomb, Ph. D. Latin and History 

Professor of Latin, Randolph-Macon Woman's College. 

Benjamin F. Lovelace, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Wm. Starr Myers, Ph. D. History 

Assistant Professor of History and Politics, Princeton University. 

A. Herman Pftjnd, Ph. D. Physics 

Associate Professor of Physics. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph.D. German 

Associate in German. 

Willabd S. Small, Ph. D. Secondary Education 

Principal of Eastern High School, Washington, D. C. 

Frederick C. Tarr, A. B. Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish, Mt. St. Agnes' College. 
David G. Thompson, A. M. Geography 

Instructor in Geology, Goucher College. 

Nathaniel R. Whitney, Ph. D. Economics- 

Instructor in Political Economy. 

Willis H. Wilcox, Ph. M. English 

Head of Department of English, Maryland State Normal School. 

Henry Wood, Ph. D. German 

Professor of German. 



10 Summer Courses [220 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BIOLOGY 

1. Botany. Associate Professor Enders. C. 9.30 

The main part of the laboratory work will be the study of the 
life histories and structure of a liverwort, a fern, and a seed plant, 
supplemented by less detailed work upon a few other forms such 
as an alga, chara, and a moss. There will also be occasional field 
excursions for the purpose of collecting and identifying about fifty 
plants representing the main divisions of the plant kingdom. The 
lectures will deal with the more essential facts of the morphology 
and physiology of plants. 

2. Zoology. Associate Professor Enders. C. 12.30 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a rather intensive 
study of such representative animals as amoeba, hydra, an earth- 
worm, a crayfish and a frog. The behavior of these animals as 
well as their structure will be studied. In addition to this work 
there will be occasional field excursions to streams, forests, and 
open fields, for the purpose of becoming better acquainted with the 
habitats of animals. The lectures will supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures will be devoted 
to the more general problems of zoological science. 

Laboratory fee: $1.00 for one, or both courses. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. G. 12.30 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough train- 
ing in inorganic chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate 
students and those who wish to prepare for entrance to the Medical 
School. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Norris, Organic 
Chemistry (McGraw Hill Book Co.). 

2. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Love- 
lace. G. 9.30 

A course of lectures for advanced students. 

3. Inorganic Reactions and Inorganic Preparations. Associ- 
ate Professor Lovelace. G. 10.30-1.20 

A laboratory course. 

4. Quantitative Analysis. Associate Professor Lovelace. 
G. 10.30-1.20 

A laboratory course. 



221] 



Domestic Art 11 



5. Household and Textile Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. 
C. 1.30 

This course is intended for those who have taken elementary 
courses in chemistry, domestic art and science. In addition to a 
discussion of the general principles of organic chemistry, such sub- 
jects as fuels, combustion, oxidation, water (its purification and 
analysis), food principles, preparation and testing of foods, soaps, 
chemical nature of fabrics, principles of dyeing, cleansing agents, etc., 
will be presented. 

In the laboratory the work will follow the line of household or 
textile chemistry, as the student may select. 

6. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. 

C. 11.30 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. 
It will include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of 
the more important non-metallic and metallic elements and their 
properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer Course) will be used as a 
basis for the class-room and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fees: $5.00 for one course, or for morning or afternoon 
work; $8.00 for two courses or for work all day. (The fee for mate- 
rials does not include the cost of small pieces of apparatus not 
returnable, and the charge for breakage to be paid at the close of 
the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00.) 



DOMESTIC ART 

1. Textiles and Clothing. Miss Avery. P. S. No. 79. C. 
8.30-11.20 

This course offers technical practice in the construction of shirt 
waist suits, simple costumes, and blouses, with the following re- 
lated subjects: (a) dress finishes and hand ornamentation; (b) 
design in the selection of material, style, and color; (c) fabrics in 
regard to their structure, properties, adulteration, and wear. Stu- 
dents provide material subject to approval of instructor; cost de- 
termined individually. 

Pre-requisite : Course 2, or its equivalent. Parallel: Chemistry 5. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

2. Elementary Clothing. Miss Avery. P. S. No. 79. C. 
1.30-4.20 

A study of the stitches and principles underlying elementary gar- 
ment construction. The emphasis is placed upon machine and hand 
work, drafting, alteration, and use of patterns. Simple garment 
making. Students provide material approved by instructor ; approxi- 
mate cost, $5.00. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 



12 Summer Courses [222 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1. Advanced Cookery. Miss Gray. P. S. No. 79. C. 10.30- 
12.20 

In this course the aim is to apply the knowledge of cooking prin- 
ciples gained in elementary cookery, and to add to it an understand- 
ing of the economic and nutritional questions involved in the selec- 
tion, preparation, and serving of food. 

The preservation of foods of all types, the food value of foods, 
and the planning, cooking and serving of different priced dietaries 
for children, adults, and invalids will be studied in recitation and 
laboratory. 

Pre-requisite : Course 2, or its equivalent. Parallel: Chemistry 5. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

2. Elementary Cookery. Miss Gray. P. S. No. 79. C. 8.30- 
10.20 

The aim of this course is to give an understanding of the princi- 
ples underlying and involved in the cooking and preserving of pro- 
tein, fat, and carbohydrate foods, so that the student will be, to a 
large extent, independent of cook books, and able to understand, 
criticize, and vary recipes. 

The course will deal with food preparation based on a knowledge 
of the composition of foods, and the changes produced by micro- 
organisms, heat and moisture. The equipment of the home kitchen 
will be studied. 

Pre-requisite or Parallel: Chemistry 6. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

3. Methods of Teaching Domestic Science. Miss Gray. P. S. 
No. 79. C. 12.30. 

The aim of this course is to enable the teacher to make a wise 
selection of subject matter for her own classes, and to give practice 
in lesson planning and teaching. 

The course will include study of the different types of institutions 
in which cookery is taught; the aims and needs of these, and the 
adaptation of courses of studies to them; correlation of Domestic 
Science with other branches; equipment; lesson planning, and meth- 
ods of presentation. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

ECONOMICS 

1. The Money Market and the European War. Dr. Whit- 
ney. G. 8.30 

Designed for those who have had preliminary work in political 
economy or who have some familiarity with the principles of bank- 
ing and finance. 



223] Education 13 

The course will include a discussion of monetary laws, an analysis 
of the banking systems in the chief money markets of the world, a 
study of the principles of foreign exchange, and an examination of 
the effects of the war on the international exchanges as marked by 
the accumulations of gold, the changes in the rate of exchange, the 
selling of securities, and the issuing of paper money. 

2. Social Reforms. Dr. Whitney. C. 10.30 

A study will be made of the economic and social aspects of such 
proposals as socialism, land nationalization, profit sharing, pension 
systems, child labor and minimum wage legislation. 

3. Public Finance. Dr. Whitney. C. 12.30 

The principles governing public revenue and public expenditure 
will be considered and the various kinds of taxes employed will be 
critically analyzed. 

EDUCATION 

1. The Administration of Secondary Education. Dr. Small. 
G. 8.30 

This course will consider two increasingly important groups of 
administrative problems incident to the socialization of education: 
the extra-classroom school activities such as athletics, military 
training, debating, dramatics, journalism, clubs, fraternities, student 
guidance, and student participation in government; and the social 
and community uses of the high school plant and organization. The 
course will be of interest to school administrators and teachers and 
also to social workers. Lectures, readings and reports. 

Text: Johnston, The Modern High School (Scribner's). 

2. Experimental Education. Professor Baldwin. G. 9.30 

This course deals with psycho-educational processes in action 
from the scientific point of view, and -is based upon a comparative 
study of investigations in educational research. Emphasis will be 
placed on methods of approaching educational problems and the 
application and evaluation of measuring scales and mental tests 
with particular reference to adolescence. 

Lectures, demonstrations, experiments and special reports. 

3. Secondary School Teaching. Dr. Small. G. and C. 10.30 

In this course consideration will be given to recent tendencies in 
the development of the high school program of studies, the organiza- 
tion of courses of study, changing emphasis in methods, standards 
of teaching and measurement of results. Lectures, reports and 
demonstrations. 

4. Educational Psychology. Professor Baldwin. G and C. 
12.30 

This course aims to present from a modern experimental point of 
view the psychological data and principles underlying educational 



14 Summer Courses [224 

theory and practice, with particular reference to the learning pro- 
cess and modes of behavior. The scope of the course includes a 
general survey of individual differences in mental traits of childhood 
and adolescence. Texts, lectures, demonstrations, experiments, 
reports. 

5. The Elementary School: Grammar Grades. Dr. Leland. 
C. 11.30 

This course will present the theory and practice of teaching the 
various subjects in the last four years of the elementary school. 
The point of view resulting from the extension into elementary educa- 
tion of Froebelian principles and such concepts as motivation 
judgment, initiative, responsibility and participation in social life 
appropriate to children will underlie the work. The selection of 
subject matter, the method of instruction, and the management of 
children will receive attention. 

Lectures, required reading, and discussion, based so far as possible 
upon observation of lessons. 

6. The Elementary School: Primary Grades. Miss Broch- 

HAUSEN. C. 12.30 

By means of lectures and discussions this course will consider the 
problems peculiar to the first four years of the elementary school. 
The subject matter for each grade will be outlined, and effective 
methods for presenting the material will be given. Outside reading 
and written reports will be required. 

Text: Strayer, A Brief Course in the Teaching Process (Mac- 
millan ) . 

7. The Teaching op English in the Elementary School. 
Miss Brochhausen. C. 8.30 

This course of lectures, reports, and discussions will be devoted to 
the teaching of English in the eight grades of the elementary school. 
Special emphasis will be placed upon the teaching of oral and writ- 
ten composition, the correlation between composition and literature, 
and the relation of spelling and grammar to composition. It will 
be shown how composition can be kept interesting and made vital 
to children. Outside reading will be required. 

8. The Teaching of Arithmetic and History in the Ele- 
mentary School. Dr. Leland. C. 10.30 

The first part of the course treats of the recent developments in 
the material and methods of teaching arithmetic in the eight grades 
of the elementary school. The fundamental processes, drill, the top- 
ics involving the application of the subject in modern business, the 
selection and grading of applied problems, and the proper balance of 
abstract and concrete work will receive attention. Consideration will 
also be given to the psychological investigations and tests relating to 
the teaching of arithmetic. 



225] Education 15 

The aims, materials, and methods of teaching history in the ele- 
mentary school will receive attention in the second part of the 
course. The practical work consists of exercises in the selection and 
arrangement of materials in a course in history, the preparation of 
lesson plans, and so far as possible the observation and criticism of 
teaching exercises. 

Lectures, required reading, lesson plans, and reports on observation. 

9. Supervision op Rural Schools. Mr. Cooper. C. 9.30 

The aim of this course is to study the technical work of this field 
of supervision in light of the larger problems of the place and mean- 
ing of the rural school. The chief topics will be the present status 
of rural education in the United States, the newer rural economic 
and social problems in relation to the specific work of the supervisor 
both in the school and in the community, the course of study, aims 
and methods of school visitation including the principles of criticism 
of teaching, the training of teachers in service, and some of the 
practical problems of the supervisor. Lectures, required readings 
and special reports. 

10. Rural School: Methods Course. Miss Lathrop. C. 11.30 

In this course an opportunity will be given for a discussion of the 
principles illustrated in Course 11, the demonstration school. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be placed upon the program, daily preparation of 
the teacher, the keeping of a plan book, seat work, the recreation 
period and the possibilities of vocational subjects in the rural school. 
In addition attention will be given to school buildings, rural hygiene, 
and consolidation. Library readings and reports will be required. 

11. A Demonstration School: Observation Course. Miss 
Lathrop. C. 9.30-11.20 

The purpose of this course will be to illustrate by the laboratory 
method the organization of a one- teacher school where seven grades 
are represented. It will be shown how by alternation, combination and 
elimination the number of classes can be reduced to the least possi- 
ble number. The course of study for Maryland will be the basis 
upon which the program will be built. Attention will be given to 
seat work, the recreation period and the vitalization of the rural 
school. 

(If taken alone, the tuition fee for Course 11 is $25.00.) 

12. The Principles op Elementary Teaching. Mr. Cooper. 
11.30 

This course will study the principles of teaching in their applica- 
tion to the state elementary course of study, including special 
methods in teaching the various subjects throughout the grades. 
Review of subject matter will be made wherever necessary. The 
course will be based on the Maryland Teachers' Manual and Course 
of Study (issued in 1914), and is especially designed, in connection 
with Course 13, to meet the new legal requirement of persons wishing 
to secure the minimum preparation for teaching. 



16 Summer Courses [226 

13. School Management and School Law. Supt. Holloway. 

12.30 

In close connection with Course 12, the problems of the organi- 
zation of a school, program making, class and pupil management, 
text-books, supplies and apparatus, care and supervision of school 
property, the legal duties of teachers, trustees and school boards, 
as officers of the state, contracts, records and reports will be studied 
so as to meet the needs of persons wishing to secure the minimum 
preparation for teaching. The work will be based on the Maryland 
School Law and Elementary Course of Study. 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Description and Narration. Professor Gay. C. 10.30 

Description and narration will be studied, especially as exemplified 
in the sketch, the tale, the short story, and the one-act play. Con- 
stant practice will be afforded in writing, and themes will be criti- 
cised in the class room (anonymously) and in private conference. 

Text : Maxcy, Representative Narratives ( Houghton Mifflin Co. ) . 

2. Theme- Writing. Professor Gay. G. 8.30 

The special work of this class will be the theory and practice of 
exposition. The other forms of discourse will be discussed briefly, 
and the prose writings of selected authors will be studied as models. 
Constant drill in writing will be provided for, and the essays will 
be criticised in the class room (anonymously) and in private con- 
ference. The work is of the same grade as that of the usual college 
freshman course. 

Text: Lomer and Ashmun, The Study and Practice of Writing 
English (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

3. Elements of English Composition. Mr. Wilcox. 10.30 

This course is planned for teachers and others who feel the need 
of more training in the fundamental principles of composition. The 
work will include a study of the theory of sentence structure. Effort 
will be made to develop ability in the use of words and sentences by 
means of regular practice. Written work will be required through- 
out the course, accompanied by class criticism and personal con- 
ferences. 

Text: Wilcox, Daily English Lessons ( Lippincott ) . 

4. English Grammar. Mr. Wilcox. 9.30 

In this study and review of the essentials of English Grammar, 
stress will be laid on the meaning and value of the subject for both 
correctness in expression and correctness and ease in interpretation. 
Attention will be given to the new grammatical nomenclature. 
The course is intended for those who are teaching, or are preparing 
to teach, the subject. 



227] French 17 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Tennyson : Idylls of the King. Professor Kern. G. 9.30 

The Idylls will be studied from the standpoint of their sources, 
their unity, and their meaning. 

Texts: Tennyson, Poems (Cambridge, or Globe edition) ; Malory, 
Morte D' Arthur (Globe edition). 

2. Shakespeare: Tragedies. Professor Kern. G. 12.30 

A course in the substance and construction of Shakespearean trag- 
edy, based upon a detailed study of Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and 
Macbeth. Other tragedies will be read as parallel reading. 

3. History of the English Language. Professor Kern. G. 

8.30. 

A course in the English language from its beginning to the present 
time. Some study will be made of words and their use in modern 
English. This course will presuppose an elementary knowledge of 
Anglo-Saxon. 

4. The History of English Literature, 1600-1775. Professor 
Gay. C. 11.30 

A survey of the literature of the periods spanned by the lives of 
Milton, Dryden, Pope, and Johnson. The following subjects will be 
considered, the authors named being studied as representative: 
Jacobean Prose and Poetry (Milton, Donne, Bunyan, and Browne) ; 
the Caroline Lyric (Herrick) ; Restoration Drama (Dryden and Con- 
greve) ; Augustan Prose (Addison, Steele, Swift, DeFoe, Johnson, 
and Goldsmith) ; the Augustan Novel (Richardson and Fielding) ; 
and Augustan Verse ( Pope ) . 

Text: Cunliffe, Pyre, and Young, Century Readings in English 
Literature ( The Century Co. ) . 



FRENCH 

1. The French Theater in the Seventeenth Century. Dr. 
Gruenbaum. C. 12.30 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility 
in reading modern French. The lectures will deal with the language 
of the seventeenth century, and with the life and works of the chief 
representatives of the classical theater. 

Text : Corneille, Le Cid, ed. Searles ( Ginn ) ; Corneille, Horace, ed. 
Matzke (Heath) ; Racine, Phedre, ed. Babbitt (Heath) ; Racine, Atha- 
lie, ed. Warren (Holt) ; Moliere, Les Femmes Savantes, ed. Brush 
(Macmillan) ; Moliere, Le Misanthrope, ed. Braunholz (Cambridge 
University Press ) . 



18 Summer Courses [228 

2. Readings in French. Dr. Gruenbaum. C. 11.30 

This course is intended for students who have the equivalent of 
Course 3, in whole or in part. Work in composition will accompany 
the reading of texts. 

Text: Augier, Un Beau Mariage, ed. Symington (Holt) ; Theuriet, 
L'AbM Daniel, ed. Taylor (Holt) ; Maupassant, Short Stories, ed. 
Brush (Holt); Keren's French Composition (Holt). 

3. Elementary French. Dr. Gruenbaum. C. 10.30 

The work will consist in a study of the essentials of grammar, drill 
on pronunciation, practice in writing, and careful reading of easy 
prose. 

Texts: Olmsted's Elementary French Grammar (Holt) ; Malot, 
Sans Famille, ed. Spiers (Heath) ; Labiche, La Grammaire, ed. Levi 
(Heath). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfilment of the entrance requirements in French. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Physical and Economic Geography. Mr. Thompson. C. 9.30 

The first part of this course will be devoted to physical geography, 
taking up the origin and modification of land forms, climate, and 
weather. Following this will be considered the influence of the natu- 
ral environment (topography, soils, climate, flora, and fauna) on the 
life of man, and in the development of civilization and of trade. The 
influence of geographic factors in history (including the Great War) 
will be discussed. In the latter part of the course the physical fea- 
tures, resources, industries, and commercial relations of the United 
States will be studied. Laboratory work will include the study of 
maps, rocks, and minerals. Several field trips will be taken to study 
the physiographic features of the Baltimore region. 



GERMAN 

I! SWABIAN AND AUSTRIAN POETS IN THE FlRST HALF OP THE 

Nineteenth Century. Professor Wood. G. 10.30 

The period from Uhland to Morike will be considered in its chief 
representatives. Particular attention will be given to the relation 
of the Swabians to Young Germany and to Heine. Among the Aus- 
trian poets, Grillparzer, Lenau and Anastasius Grim will be speci- 
ally studied. 

2. Two Epochs op Reform in German Language and Style. 

Professor Wood. G. 8.30. 

(a) The period of the Sprachgesellschaften, and of Purism in Ger- 
man style (XVII Century). 



229] History 19 

(b) The contest between the Swiss-German and Leipzig literary 

schools, and the resulting triumph of naturalism in German 

style (XVIII Century). 

Students are requested to procure Wilhelm Wackernagel's Ge- 

schichte der deutschen Literatur. Zweite Auflage. Band II. Basel, 

1894. 

3. Advanced German. Dr. Roulston. G. and C. 9.30. 

This course will presuppose considerable facility in reading Ger- 
man. The works of Heinrich von Kleist will form the basis of study. 
Students are requested to procure Kleist's Werke, ed. Schmidt (Mey- 
ers Klassiker-Ausgaben, M. 10.00 ) . 

4. Readings in German. Dr. Roulston. C. 8.30. 

Intended for those who already have some knowledge of the lan- 
guage. Special attention will be paid to the acquisition of a reading 
vocabulary. 

Texts: Schtcarzwaldleut', ed. Roedder (Holt); Eichendorff, Aus 
dem Leben eines Taugenichts, ed. Osthaus (Heath); Keller, Romeo 
und Julia auf dem Dorfe, ed. Corwin (Holt). 

5. Elementary German. Dr. Roulston. G. 10.30. 

In this course emphasis will be laid primarily upon the grammar of 
the language. It will meet the needs of those beginning the lan- 
guage and of such as desire a thorough review in the grammar. 

Texts: Vos, Essentials of German, 4th edition, 1914. (Holt). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as 
partial fulfillment of the entrance requirements in German. 



HISTORY 

1. Pan-American Relations. Assistant Professor Crane. G. 

11.30 

A study of Pan-Americanism from an historical and diplomatic 
point of view. After a preliminary survey of the colonial systems 
established in America and of their termination in large part by 
revolutions, attention will be directed to the growth of the Pan- 
American idea, the Monroe, Calvo and Drago doctrines, and the 
special problems of international law and policy which affect the 
relations of the United States and other American republics. 

2. American History, 1848-1877. Assistant Professor Myers. 

G. and C. 9.30 

Special attention will be given to Secession, Civil War, and Re- 
construction, including a consideration of the constitutional, political 
and economic questions involved. A study of the sources as well as 
of the standard authorities will be required. 



20 Summer Courses [230 

3. American History to 1783. Assistant Professor Myers. 
C. 8.30 

The age of discoveries, the period of colonization and the struggles 
of European nations for dominion in North America, the development 
of English colonies, the Revolution and independence and the evolu- 
tion of self-government. 

Texts: Becker, Beginnings of American People (Houghton Mifflin 
Co.); Beer, British Colonial Policy 1754-1765 (Macmillan); Lecky, 
American Revolution, ed. Woodburn (Appleton). 

4. European History since 1815. Assistant Professor Myers. 
C. 10.30 

After a brief treatment of the reconstruction of Europe after the 
fall of Napoleon, special attention will be given to the development 
of Italian and German unity, political and economic reform in Eng- 
land, the movements leading to the present alignment of the powers, 
and the causes of the recent and present wars. 

Texts: Hazen, Europe since 1815 (Holt); Headlam, Bismarck 
( Putnam ) ; Cesaresco, Cavour ( Macmillan ) . 

5. Greek History. Professor Lipscomb. C. 9.30. 

This course is designed to give a general survey of Greek history 
from the beginning to the conquests of Alexander. Stress will be laid 
upon the development of the Greek city-state and upon the continuity 
of Greek civilization. 

Texts: Bury, Students' History of Greece (Macmillan) ; Thallon, 
Readings in Greek History (Ginn) ; McKinley's Illustrated Topics 
for Ancient History will also be used. 



LATIN 

1. Livy: Books xxi-xxii. Professor Lipscomb. C. 12.30. 

A study of the Hannibalic War. This course will cover the equiva- 
lent of the first half-year in college Latin I. 

Text: Westcott, Livy, Books I, XXI, XXII (Allyn and Bacon). 

2. Virgil: Aeneid i-vt. Professor Lipscomb. 8.30. 

It is the aim of this course to give the student some appreciation 
of the literary and historical value of the Aeneid. The work will 
cover the fourth year of high school Latin. 

Text : Knapp, Virgil, Aeneid I -VI ( Scott, Foresman & Co. ) . 



MANUAL TRAINING 

1. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. Mr. 

Gaither. P. S. No. 79. C. 8.30-10.20 

This course includes the theory and practice of teaching the use 
of tools and bench work in wood in the upper elementary and lower 



231] Mathematics 21 

secondary grades, the use of drawing instruments and making sim- 
ple working drawings, outlining courses, planning equipment and 
methods of individual and class exercise. Advanced construction in 
both hard and soft woods will be available for advanced students. 
Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

2. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. P. S. No. 
79. C. 10.30 

This course includes hand-work processes in paper, cardboard, 
weaving, raffia, basketry, bookbinding and woodwork suitable for 
the first six years of the elementary schools, and in materials suit- 
able for rural schools. Outlining courses, planning equipment, and 
study of methods will be considered. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will 
find this course adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

3. Hand-Work for Teachers of Backward and Defective 
Children. Mr. Gaither. P. S. No. 79. C. 11.30 

This course presents for the aid of special teachers manual activi- 
ties adapted to the needs of backward and mentally defective children. 
The materials and lessons form a natural sequence, the steps being 
so arranged as. to lead the pupil in an easy manner to a gradual 
development of muscular control. Conferences and assigned readings. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 



MATHEMATICS 

1. Higher Algebra. Associate Professor Coble. G. 8.30 

Some of the important developments with their geometric applica- 
tions will be considered as a basis for further work. 

2. Theory of Functions. Associate Professor Coble. G. 
10.30 

In this course some of the methods and functions of applied mathe- 
matics will be studied. 

The work in Courses 1 and 2 will be conducted by means of infor- 
mal lectures, conferences and reports, and will be adapted to indi- 
vidual needs. 

3. Analytic Geometry. Associate Professor Coble. C. 11.30 
This course includes part of the work of the first college year. 

4. Teachers' Course in Secondary Mathematics. Associate 

Professor Coble. C. 12.30 

The broader aspects of algebra and geometry which are of particu- 
lar importance to teachers will be presented. Eequired reading and 
special reports. 



22 Summer Courses • [232 



MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing 
its summer session of six weeks, July third to August twelfth. Its 
program includes courses in Rhythmic Gymnastics, Normal and En- 
semble Classes, Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello, Composition, 
History of Music, the Appreciation of Music, Harmony, and Form 
and Analysis. 

Under a new arrangement, candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science may offer for credit two courses in music, one including 
the History of Music and the Appreciation of Music, the other includ- 
ing Harmony and Form and Analysis, when officially reported by 
the Conservatory as having been satisfactorily completed. 

As the buildings of the University and the Conservatory are in 
close proximity, students desiring instruction in music will find it 
convenient to arrange their courses in the two institutions. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application 
to either the University or the Conservatory. 



PHYSICS 

1. Selected Topics in the Mathematical Theory of Elec- 
tricity. Professor Ames. G. 9.30 

2. Radioactivity. Professor Ames. G. 11.30 
(a) Alternate. X-Rays and X-Ray Spectra. 

3. Wave-Motions: Sound and Light. Associate Professor 
Pfund. C. 8.30 

Lectures and laboratory instruction. 

4. Electricity and Magnetism. Associate Professor Pfund. 
C. 12.30 

Lectures and laboratory instruction. 

5. Teachers' Course in General Physics. Professor Ames 
and Associate Professor Pfund. C. 10.30 

A course designed especially for teachers in high schools. Mani- 
pulation of simple apparatus for demonstration purposes will be 
taught; the use of the lantern will be explained; and, if there is 
a demand for instruction in photography, this will be given. 



233] Psychology 23 



PLAYGROUND AND RECREATION 

Singing Games, Folk Dances, and Athletic Games. Miss 
Gross. 4.30-5.45 

This course for the training of leaders in playground and recrea- 
tion work is offered in cooperation with the Children's Playground 
Association of Baltimore, Inc. It includes the theory and practice 
of singing games and athletics, a study of their place in an educa- 
tional program, the development of the game and dance for use in 
the primary and grammar grades, and for recreational purposes in 
general. 

Tuition fee: If taken alone, $10.00; if taken as a fourth course, 
$5.00 in addition to the regular tuition. A minimum registration 
of ten is required. 

(See Manual Training 2.) 



POLITICS 

1. International Law. Assistant Professor Crane. G. 9.30 

After a review of the elements of international law, the notable 
questions arising from the present war in Europe will be considered 
with particular reference to the rights and duties of neutrals. 

2. Municipal Government. Assistant Professor Crane. C. 8.30 

A study of the social, political and legal character of the city; his- 
tory of the development of municipal government from a compara- 
tive standpoint; its legal powers and responsibilities; municipal 
home-rule; its organization: council, mayor, commission, and mana- 
ger types. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Experimental Psychology. Associate Professor Dunlap. G. 

Opportunity for experimental work in the laboratory will be offered 
to persons who are prepared to carry on independent minor inves- 
tigation. 

2. The Affective Processes. Associate Professor Dunlap. 
G. 11.30 

A study of the feelings and emotions, and. of their expressions, 
conditions, and effects on mental processes. Especial attention will 
be given to the methods, apparatus and technique of investigation in 
this field. 

Pre-requisite : Course 3, or its equivalent. 



24 Summer Courses [234 

3. Introduction to General Psychology. Associate Professor 

Dunlap. C. 8.30 

This course is intended for those who have had no training in psy- 
chology, or who wish to review the elementary work. The essential 
facts and principles of analytical and functional psychology will be 
outlined in lectures, with demonstrations, supplemented by assigned 
reading. 



SPANISH 

1. Readings in Spanish. Mr. Tarr. C. 9.30 

Prose composition and reading; practice in oral Spanish. Open to 
those who have absolved Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 

Texts: Crawford, Spanish Prose Composition (Holt) ; Morrison, 
Tres comedias modernas (Holt) ; Alarcon, El Capitdn Veneno 
(Heath). 

2. Elementary Spanish. Mr. Tarr. G. 10.30 

This course in written and spoken Spanish will include drill on 
pronunciation, the essentials of grammar, and reading. 

Texts: Coester, A Spanish Grammar (Ginn) ; Hills, Spanish Tales 
for Beginners (Holt) ; Howland, Zaragiieta (Silver, Burdett & Co.). 



SCHEDULE 



8.30—9.20 



Domestic Art 1 

(8.30—11.20) 
Domestic Science 2 

(8.30—40.20) 
Economics 1 
Education 1 
Education 7 
English Composition 2 
English Literature 3 
German 2 
German 4 
History 3 
Latin 2 
Manual Training 1 

(8.30—10.20) 
Mathematics 1 
Physics 3 
Politics 2 
Psychology 3 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Chemistry 2 
Education 2 
Education 9 

Education 11 (9.30—11.20) 
(Demonstration School 
English Composition 4 
English Literature 1 
Geography 
German 3 
History 2 
History 5 
Physics 1 
Politics 1 
Spanish 1 

10.30—11.20 

Chemistry 3 

(10.30—1.20) 
Chemistry 4 

(10.30—1.20) 
Domestic Science 1 
(10.30—12.20) 
Economics 2 
Education 3 
Education 8 
English Composition 1 
English Composition 3 



French 3 
German 1 
German 5 
History 4 
Manual Training 2 
Mathematics 2 
Physics 5 
Spanish 2 

11.30—12.20 

Chemistry 6 
Education 5 
Education 10 
Education 12 
English Literature 4 
French 2 
History 1 
Manual Training 3 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 2 
Psychology 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Chemistry 1 
Domestic Science 3 
Economics 3 
Education 4 
Education 6 
Education 13 
English Literature 2 
French 1 
Latin 1 
Mathematics 4 
Physics 4 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 5 
Domestic Art 2 

(1.30—4.20) 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Physical Laboratory 
Psychological Laboratory 

4.30—6.45 

Playground and Recreation 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 257 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A.M. and Ph.D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degbee M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degbee A. B. 
(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B. and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



Forty-first year opens October 3, 1916 
For circulars address T. R. BALL, Registrar 



Sew Series, 1917 Whole Number 294 

No. 4 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 

EDITED BY 

THOMAS R. BALL 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY 



SUMMER COURSES 

JUNE 26— AUGUST 7 

1917 

UNIVERSITY OF IU L«C • 






Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

April, 1917 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



CALENDAR, 1917 



June 12, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



June 23, Saturday — ) 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration, 

June 25, Monday — \ Academic Building, Homewood. 

June 26, Tuesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 

begins. 

July 4, Wednesday — Independence Day: University buildings closed. 

August 7, Tuesday — Close of Summer Courses. 



October 2; Tuesday — Forty-second regular session begins. 

October 8, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, ninth year begins. 

October 15, Monday — Evening Courses in Business Economics and in 
Engineering, second year begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, June 26, 
according to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that 
students should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening 
exercise of each course. 

Registration should be made prior to June 26, 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 

1917 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Fbank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 

Director of the Summer Courses 

Thomas R. Ball, 
Registrar 

\Y. Graham Boyce, 

Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

Joseph S. Ames, Ph. D. Physics 

Professor of Physics. 

Alda L. Armstrong School Attendance 

Maryland Children's Aid Society. 

Frank P. Bachman, Ph. D. Educational Administration 

General Education Board. 

Bird T. Baldwin, Ph. D. Education 

Professor of Psychology and Education, Swarthmore College, and Lecturer on 
Education. 

Florence E. Bamberger, A. M. Elementary Education 

Instructor in Education. 

Ernest J. Becker, Ph. D. English 

Principal, Eastern High School, Baltimore. 

Elbert J. Benton, Ph. D. History 

Professor of History, Western Reserve University. 

Frank R. Blake, Ph. D. Semitics 

Associate in Oriental Languages. 

Anna Brochhai '*en, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervising Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Erasmo Buceta, Doctor en Derecho Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish. 

Howard V. Canter, Ph. D. History and Latin 

Associate Professor of Classics, University of Illinois, 

Arthur B. Coble, Ph. D. Mathematics 

Usociate Professor of Mathematics. 



427] 



2 Summer Courses [428 

George A. Conlon Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Clarence G. Cooper, B. S. Elementary and Rural Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Baltimore County, Maryland. 

Knight Dunlap, Ph. D. Psychology 

Professor of Experimental Psychology. 

Israel Efros, Ph. D. Philosophy 

Aaron Ember, Ph. D. Semites 

Associate Professor of Semitic Languages. 

Howard E. Enders, Ph. D. Biology 

Professor of Zoology and Head of General Biology, Purdue University. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Gustav Gruenbatjm, Ph. D. French 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

William J. Holloway, A.M. Elementary Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Wicomico County, Maryland. 

George L. Jones School Attendance 

Secretary, Maryland Children's Aid Society. 

Edith A. Lathrop, A. M. Rural Education 

Assistant in Rural Education, United States Bureau of Education. 

Jack London Penmanship 

Palmer School of Penmanship, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Benjamin F. Lovelace, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

C. Ethel MacRoberts, A. B. Secondary Education 

Ralph V. D. Magoffin, Ph. D. Classical Archaeology and Art 

Associate Professor of Greek and Roman History. 

E. H. Kemper McComb, A. M. Secondary Education 

Acting Principal and Head of English Department, Manual Training High 
School, Indianapolis. 

Frederick A. Merrill, B. S. Agricultural Education 

Professor of Economics, State Normal School, Athens, Georgia. 

Persis K. Miller School-Community Relations 

Principal, Public School No. 76, Baltimore City. 

Arthur C. Millspaugh, Ph. D. Politics 

Acting Professor of Political Science, Whitman College. 

A. Herman Pfund, Ph. D. Physics 

Associate Professor of Physics. 

Chilton L. Powell, Ph. D. English 

Instructor in English. 

Henry A. Roben Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate in German. 



429] 



Instructors 



d. c. 



Carol M. Sax 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

May Secrest, B. S. 

Head of Household Arts Department, State 
Obispo, California. 

Henry Slonimsky, Ph. D. 

Associate in Philosophy. 
Willard S. Small, Ph. D. 

Principal, Eastern High School, Washington, 

Edith H. Stewart 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

David G. Thompson, A. M. 

Instructor in Geology, Goucher College. 

James W. Tupper, Ph. D. 

Professor of English, Lafayette College. 

C. Y. Turner, N. A. 

Director of the Maryland Institute of Art. 

Charles H. Webb 

Instructor, Maryland Institute' of Art. 

Nathaniel R. Whitney, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Economics, Iowa State University. 

Henry Wood, Ph. D. 

Professor of German. 



Fine Arts 

Domestic Science 
Polytechnic School, San Luis 



Philosophy 
Education 
Fine Arts 
Geography 

English 
Fine Arts 
Fine Arts 
Economics 

German 



Edith A. Lathrop, A. M. 

United States Bureau of Education. 



SCHOOLS OF OBSERVATION 

1. Rural Demonstration School 
A 112* 



Grades I-VII 



2. Elementary School 

Ida V. Flowers M 109 Grades I and II 

Practice Teacher, Baltimore City Schools. 

Maude B. Smith M 121 Grade IV 

Teacher in Pimlico School, Baltimore County, Maryland. 

Helen M. Burnett M 117 Grade V 

Teacher in Baltimore City School. 

Matilda Srager C 115 Grade VI 

Teacher in New York City School. 

Julia F. Beck C215 Grade VII 

Practice Teacher, Baltimore City Schools. 

3. Practice Class in Teaching Art 

Carol M. Sax M 119 Drawing, Modelling, and Design 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 



* Buildings : A, Academic ; C, Civil Engineering ; M, Mechanical Engineering. 



Summer Courses [430 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The seventh year of the Summer Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Tuesday, June 26, and continue until Tues- 
day, August 7, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be held every 
week-day, Monday to Friday, excepting Wednesday, July 4. Each 
course will consist of thirty class exercises or their equivalent. In 
the sciences laboratory work will be additional. Examinations will 
be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Boards of study, they are an integral 
part of the work of the University. All the resources of the insti- 
tution essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the 
students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses of- 
fered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate stu- 
dents who wish to advance their standing or to make up deficiencies; 
others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in part the 
entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not given in 
the regular session are offered to meet special needs of schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing grad- 
uate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced to 
meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular class 
exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work of 
the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs of 
individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

There will be conducted at the University, in cooperation with the 
Baltimore County Board of Education, an elementary school of seven 
grades, designed primarily to demonstrate typical means and material 
for more effective teaching in rural schools. 

In cooperation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners 
a free elementary school, including the first, second, fourth, fifth, 
sixth and seventh grades, will be conducted as a means of affording 
illustrative material for the courses in elementary education. Pupils 
of the Baltimore Public Schools will be given an opportunity to make 
up deficiencies or do advanced work, the same as in the regular city 
vacation schools, and the privilege of promotion, in accordance with 
their achievements in the classes from the fourth to the seventh 
grades, inclusive. 

Three city graded vacation schools, including possibly a vocational 
school, will be open during the session and available to students for 
observation in connection with the courses in elementary education. 



431] General Statement 5 

A group of classes for practice teaching in drawing, modelling, and 
design will be organized in connection with the course on the theory 
and practice of teaching art. 

SELECTION OF COUBSES 

Candidates for an advanced degree should arrange their program 
in consultation with the department in which their principal subject 
lies. New students expecting to become candid -tes should present 
their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, in the selec- 
tion of courses that will meet the requirements of the regulations for 
the degrees. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the regu- 
lations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners to 
which their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with the rule 
of the Board of University Studies: the requirement of one of the 
two-years residence for this degree may be met bv attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for any of the baccalaureate 
degrees will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those 
courses designated by C. In general the same credit is given per 
hour as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two " points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an addi- 
tional credit to exceed fifty per cent be given, nor can a total credit 
of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer ses- 
sion. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 
cates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, County, and Citv Superintendents and 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on June 26th, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. The Registrar's office (219 
Academic Building) will be open for registration on Saturday, June 



6 Summer Courses [432 

23, Monday, June 25, and Tuesday, June 26, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
After June 29, admission to each course will be restricted to regis- 
tered students. With the consent of the Director, students may 
make changes in their courses, which must be reported in person to 
the Registrar, up to and including June 29. After this date no 
change of courses will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory fees, must 
be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in registration. 



NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred twenty-three acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles Street at 32nd and 34th streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line, cars marked " Guilford-Union Sta- 
tion;" from the Mt. Royal Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by walking 
two blocks east to Charles Street, and from Union Station (Pa., 
N. C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles Street, 
marked "Roland Park" or "Guilford-Union Station;" and also by 
the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles Street. One should alight 
at 32nd or 34th Street. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the student to 
attend as many as three courses. An additional course, with the ex- 
ceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may be attended, 
with the approval of the Director, upon the payment of an extra fee 
of $10.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a student may 
register in one course only, the tuition fee in such cases being $15.) 
The fees for the courses in Fine Arts and in Penmanship will be 
found in the statements of these courses, respectively. The fee for 
the use of the tennis courts at the athletic field, including towel 
service, is $2.00. Additional fees are required for materials used in 
some of the courses. ( For details, see statements of courses. ) 

No reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance; nor for 
withdrawal, except on account of serious personal illness. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn for the 
exact amount to the order of the Johns Hopkins University. For 
the convenience of students while in residence at the University, the 
Treasurer will receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment 
upon collection. There is no charge for this service other than the 
exchange. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable furnished rooms 
in private homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent 
at prices ranging from $1.50 to $3 per week for a single room, and 
$3.00 to $7.00 a week for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in 
private boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging 
from $3.50 to $6.00 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodg- 



433] General Statement 9 

ing houses will be sent upon request. The lunch room in the Student 
Activities Building on the campus will be open daily during the 
session. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening and 
closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and recitals 
which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday evening, 
in co-operation with the Summer Session of the Peabody Conserva- 
tory of Music. 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

THE UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE AND BOOK-STORE 

The University post-office, Academic Building, will be open. Stu- 
dents may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book-Store (102 Academic Building) 
supplies officers and students with text books, stationery, and other 
materials at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. The Director, Associate Professor Magoffin, (308 Aca- 
demic Building) will be present throughout the session. 

SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning June 1st and extending for six weeks, the Medical 
School of the Johns Hopkins University, in co-operation with the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, offers to graduates in medicine courses in 
Medicine, Surgery, and the various specialties. The special circular 
describing these courses and any other information concerning them 
may be obtained by addressing the Dean of the Johns Hopkins Medi- 
cal School, Washington and Monument Streets. The fees vary from 
$25 to $100, according to the number and character of the courses 
taken. 



10 Summer Courses [434 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 

1. General Biology. Professor Enders. C 9.30 A 11 * 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
and comparison, with the aid of the microscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex. The lectures will deal with 
the manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and will point 
out our present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Macmillan) ; Enders, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology. 

2. Zoology. Professor Enders. C 12.30 All 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior 
of these animals as well as their structure will be studied, including occasional 
field excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming 
better acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures will supplement, for 
the most part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures will be devoted to 
the more general problems of zoological science. 

Texts: Hegner, College Zoology (Macmillan). 

Note — If students who completed Course 2 last year desire to go on with verte- 
brates this summer, they may procure Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology (Ginn). 

3. The Teaching of Botany in Secondary Schools. Professor 

Enders and Assistant. C 11.30 All 

The course will include laboratory study of plant material with reference to 
the needs of secondary schools, and a consideration of methods of teaching 
botany. 

Laboratory fee: $1.00, for each course. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. G 12.30 C 114 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students and those who wish 
to prepare for entrance to the Medical School. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Norris, Organic Chemistry (Mc- 
Graw Hill Book Co.). 

2. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Lovelace. 

G 9.30 Chemical Lab., Druid Hill Avenue. 
A course of lectures for advanced students. 

3. Inorganic Reactions and Inorganic Preparations. Associate 

Professor Lovelace. G 10.30-1.20 Chem. Lab. 
A laboratory course. 

4. Quantitative Analysis. Associate Professor Lovelace. G 

10.30-1.20 Chem. Lab. 
A laboratory course. 

5. Household and Textile Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 

1.30 C114 

This course is intended for those who have taken elementary courses in chemis- 
try and domestic science. In addition to a discussion of the general princi- 
ples of organic chemistry, such subjects as fuels, combustion, oxidation, water (its 
purification and analysis), food principles, preparation and testing of foods, 
soaps, chemical nature of fabrics, principles of dyeing, cleansing agents, etc., 
will be presented. 

♦Buildings : A, Academic ; C, Civil Engineering ; M, Mechanical Engineering. 



435] Courses of Instruction 11 

In the laboratory the work will follow the line of household or textile chemis- 
try, as the student may select. 

6. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 
11.30 C114 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It will 
include, as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the more important non- 
metallic and metallic elements and their properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer 
Course) will be used as a basis for the class-room and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fees: $5.00 for one course, or for morning or afternoon work; $8.00 
for two courses or for work all day. (The fee for materials does not include the 
cost of small pieces of apparatus not returnable, and the charge for breakage to be 
paid at the close of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00). 

CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

The Private Life of the Romans. Associate Professor Magoffin. 
G and C 8.30 A 109 

This course will be carried on by means of class-room and museum lectures, 
and will include practical exercises requiring the use of a wide range of archaeo- 
logical objects in the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. 

The course will be the equivalent of the Collegiate Course, Classical Archaeology 
and Art 1. Advanced students will be expected to complete supplementary work. 

(See History 4). 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

1. Advanced Cookery. Miss Secrest. C 10.30-12.20 M 114 

The aim of this course is to apply the principles of cookery and to consider 
the economic and nutritional questions involved in the selection, preparation and 
serving of food. The preservation of foods of all types, the food-value of foods, 
and the planning, cooking and serving of different priced dietaries for children, 
adults, and invalids will be studied in recitation and laboratory. 

Pre- requisite: Course 2, or its equivalent. Parallel: Chemistry 5. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

2. Elementary Cookery. Miss Secrest. C 8.30-10.20 M 114 

This course will present the principles involved in cooking and preserving pro- 
tein, fat and carbohydrate foods, and deal with food preparation based on a 
knowledge of the composition of foods and the changes produced by micro- 
organisms, heat and moisture. The equipment of the home kitchen will be studied. 

Pre-requisite or parallel: Chemistry 6. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

3. Methods of Teaching Domestic Science. Miss Secrest. C 

12.30 M114 

This course includes a study of selection of subject matter of courses, different 
types of institution in which cookery is taught, and adaptation of courses of 
study to their needs, the correlation of the subject with other studies, equip- 
ment, lesson planning, methods of presentation, and practice in teaching. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

Note — Under a recently adopted rule, graduates of the Baltimore Female High 
Schools, or of other schools of the same standard, who have collegiate credits 
in domestic science and other subjects aggregating sixty points, are eligible to 
take the examinations for teachers of cooking in the Baltimore city schools. 

ECONOMICS 

1. Social Reforms. Assistant Professor Whitney. G 8.30 A 315 

In this course consideration will be given to some of the more important 
social reforms which are now receiving attention. Such topics as social insurance, 
the minimum wage, child labor, workmen's compensation, the single tax, income 
and inheritance taxation, labor organization, immigration, and socialism, will 
furnish the basis for discussion. Special readings will be assigned on each topic. 

Pre-requisite: Course 2 or its equivalent. 



12 Summer Courses [436 

2. Elements of Economics. Assistant Professor Whitney C 

10.30 A 315 

A study will be made of the principles of economics, and the application of 
these principles to everyday life will be noted. 
Text: Ely, Outlines of Economics. 

3. Economic History. Assistant Professor Whitney. C 12.30 A 315 

The evolution of industrial society from some of its primitive forms down to 
its present organization will be traced. Particular attention will be paid to the 
changes which have occurred in industry and the effect of these changes on 
economic theory and social progress. 

Text: Cheyney, Social and Industrial History of England. 

EDUCATION 

1. Experimental Education. Professor Baldwin. G 9.30 A 113 

This course deals with psycho-educational processes in action from the scientific 
point of view, and is based upon a comparative study of investigations in educa- 
tional research. Emphasis will be placed on methods of approaching educational 
problems and the application and evaluation of measuring scales and mental tests. 
Researches will be undertaken in those problems which can be approached in the 
time limits of the session. 

Lectures, demonstrations, experiments, and special reports. 

2. Educational Psychology. Professor Baldwin. G 12.30 A 113 

This course begins with a consideration of the aims and technique of general 
and experimental psychology and emphasizes the study of the development of 
mental traits and individual differences throughout childhood and adolescence. 
Work is carried on by means of lectures, texts, reports, demonstrations, and 
elementary experiments. 

3. Educational Administration. Dr. Small and Dr. Bachman 

G 8.30 A 113 

(a). The course will present a survey of the present status, tendencies, and 
problems of public education in the United States from the standpoint of the 
needs of State, county, and city systems. Each member of the class will be 
expected to select a specific problem for special investigation and report. 

(#). During the third week of the session, July 9-13, a special conference 
on the current problems in Maryland county and state administration will be con- 
ducted by Dr. Bachman, including discussions of reports on special topics. The 
hour of the conference will be arranged. 

4. School Attendance Problems. Mr. Jones and Miss Arm- 

strong. C 9.30 A 313 

This course is designed to provide such training as will enable school attendance 
officers to interpret correctly problems related to the school, and to formulate 
working methods by which the resources of the county and the State may be used 
to remove the causes of truancy and delinquency by improving social conditions 
in homes and neighborhoods. Lectures, conferences, and field work. 

5. High School Organization. Dr. Small. G and C 10.30 A 314 

This course will include a brief historical review of the American high school, 
and special study of the important present problems in the organization and 
management of the high school: Aims, differentiation of courses, electives, program 
making, junior high school, supervised study, student activities, and community 
relations. Lectures, assigned readings and reports. 

6. The Teaching of Literature in Secondary Schools. Mr. 

McComb. C 8.30 A 310 

The course will include the choice and presentation of literature in secondary 
schools, and the discussion of home reading and the use of pictures and other aids 
in teaching literature. 

7. The Teaching of English Composition in Secondary Schools. 

Mr. McComb. C 9.30 A 310 

The course will consider the problems of teaching English composition, both 
oral and written, including the relation of composition to literature and other 



437] Courses of Instruction 13 

subjects in the curriculum. Specimen compositions will be handled. The in- 
structor will be glad to have members of the class bring in sets of compositions 
for such use. 

8. The Teaching of Mathematics in Secondary Schools. Miss 

MacRoberts. C 8.30 A 311 

The aim of this course is to present a study of recent developments in the teach- 
ing of mathematics in the high school. Attention will be given to the presenta- 
tion of typical methods of recitation and to the applications of the subjects in 
various lines. Reports on assigned readings will be required. 

9. The Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools. Miss Mac- 

Roberts. C 12.30 A 310 

This course is designed for teachers who wish to get in touch with the modern 
theories and practice of teaching science in the secondary school. The course 
will include the arrangement and treatment of subject matter, the place and 
scope of laboratory work, and suggestions for meeting special needs and problems 
of members of the class. The work will include reports on special readings. 

10. The Teaching of Agriculture in Secondary Schools. Pro- 

fessor Merrill. C 9.30 A 10 

The aims, materials and methods of teaching agriculture will be discussed, and 
the relative values of experiments, demonstrations and observation lessons will be 
considered. A study of the close correlation of this subject with other high 
school sciences, the planning of agricultural courses and lessons that develop this 
relationship, and the more important agricultural products of the State will be 
included. 

Text: "Warren, Elements of Agriculture (Macmillan). 

For courses on teaching other secondary subjects, see Biology 3, Fine Arts 7 
and 10, Latin 1, Manual Training 3, and Physics 5. 

11. School Management. Supt. Holloway. C 11.30 A 310 

This course is designed primarily to meet the needs of principals of town, 
village and rural schools, and will consider first the various problems of internal 
organization, and proceed to a consideration of the relation of the school to out- 
side activities. Lectures, text, required reading, and reports. See Course 12. 

12. Graded Demonstration School. Miss Bamberger, Miss 

Brochhausen, Mr. Cooper, and Miss Miller. C 7.30 C 120 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching 
process in graded elementary schools by means of systematic observation and 
conference reports and discussion. The school will include classes of the first, 
second, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh grades. 

One conference, 7.30 a. m., four observation hours per week, and two written 
reports during the course will be required. The classes are open for observation 
to those registered for Course 12. 

The first meeting of the Conference will be at 7.30 a. m. on Wednesday, June 
27. On June 27, 28, and 29, Miss Persis K. Miller, Principal of Public School 
No. 76, Locust Point, Baltimore, will deliver three lectures on the extension of 
school life into definite community activity and modes of securing the co-opera- 
tion of public and private community organizations for the interest of the school. 
The topics of these lectures will be health, vocational adjustments, and thrift, as 
experimentally demonstrated in Public School No. "76. Opportunity will be given 
to visit the school and the Locust Point community. These three lectures are 
open to all members of the session without registration in Course 12. 

For demonstration purposes, the Board of Directors of the Park School, Balti- 
more, has extended the use of the special material of instruction and equipment 
characteristic of its work. 

Course 12 will provide demonstrations for Courses 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19. 

13. Elementary School Supervision. Miss Bamberger and Miss 

Brochhausen. G and C 10.30 A 320 

This study of the professional duties of the supervisor and the supervising 
principal will include as its chief topics principles of curriculum making, pro- 
grams and lesson plans, criticism of instruction, and the improvement of teachers 
in service. Discussion will be based upon lesson plans in actual use and on ob- 
servations in the Graded Demonstration School, Course 12. 

Attention is called to the three lectures on school-community relations to be 
given by Miss Miller on June 27, 28, and 29. See Course 12. 



14 Summer Courses [438 

14. Grammar Grade Methods. Miss Bamberger. C 12.30 A 314 

This course will present the theory and practice of teaching the various sub- 
jects in the last four years, of the elementary school. Topics to be considered 
will include the selection of subject matter, the method of instruction, and the 
management of children. Discussions will be based upon observation of lessons 
in the Graded Demonstration School, Course 12. Outside reading and written 
reports. 

15. Primary Grade Methods. Miss Brochhausen. C 11.30 A 314 

By means of lectures and discussions this course will consider the problems 
peculiar to the first four years of the elementary school. The subject matter for 
each grade will be outlined, and effective methods for presenting the material 
will be given. The course will be developed in connection with observation in 
the Graded Demonstration School, Course 12. Outside reading and reports. 

Text: Strayer, A Brief Course in the Teaching Process (Macmillan). 

16. The Teaching of English in the Elementary School. Miss 

Brochhausen. C 9.30 A 314 

The course of lectures, reports, and discussions will be devoted to the teaching 
of English in the eight grades of the elementary school. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon the teaching of oral and written composition, the correlation between 
composition and literature, and the relation of spelling and grammar to composi- 
tion. Systematic observation in the Graded Demonstration School will form a 
part of the work of the course. Outside reading will be required. 

17. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Geography in the Elemen- 

tary School. Miss Bamberger. C 8.30 A 314 

The first part of the course will deal with recent developments in the material 
and methods of teaching arithmetic in the eight grades of the elementary school. 
The fundamental processes, drill, and application of arithmetic to modern business 
will be considered. 

The aims, materials, and methods of teaching geography in the elementary 
school will be considered in the second part of the course. The preparation of 
lesson plans will receive attention. The course throughout will include observations 
in the Graded Demonstration School. Readings and written reports. 

18. The Teaching of Agriculture in the Elementary School. 

Professor Merrill. C 8.30 A 10 

This course deals with the problems of teaching agriculture in the rural and 
village school. The review of subject matter, selection of materials, correlation 
with nature study and other subjects, and methods of presentation and aids to 
better teaching, will be considered with reference to usual conditions found in 
the elementary schools of the State and to the State requirements for teachers' 
certificates. The utilization of school gardens, agricultural products clubs, and 
school and community clubs will be discussed. 

Texts: State Manual, Elementary Vocational Agriculture for Maryland Schools; 
Ivins and Merrill, Practical Lessons in Agriculture (American Book Co.). 

For courses on teaching other elementary subjects, see Domestic Science 3, Fine 
Arts 6, 7 and 10, Manual Training 3, and Penmanship 2. 

19. Supervision of Rural Schools. Mr. Cooper. G and C 9.30 A 100 

The aim of this course is to study the technical work of this field of supervision 
in the light of the larger problems of the place and meaning of the rural school. 
The chief topics will be the present status of rural education in the United States, 
the newer rural economic and social problems in relation to the specific work of 
the supervisor both in the school and in the community, the course of _ study, 
aims and methods of school visitation including the principles of criticism of 
teaching, the training of teachers in service, and some of the practical problems 
of the supervisor. 

Lectures, required readings, special reports, and critiques of lessons observed 
in the demonstration schools. 

20. Rural School : Methods Course. MissLATHROP. C 11.30 A 112 

In this course an opportunity will be given for a discussion of the principles 
illustrated in Course 21, the demonstration school. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon the program, daily preparation of the teacher, the keeping of a 
plan book, seat work, the recreation period, and the possibilities of vocational 
subjects in the rural school. In addition, attention will be given to school build- 
ings, rural hygiene, and consolidation. Library readings and reports will be 
required. Open only to those taking Course 21. 



439] Courses of Instruction 15 

21. Eural Demonstration School. Miss Lathrop. C 9.30-11.20 

A 112 

The purpose of this course will be to illustrate by the laboratory method the 
organization of a one-teacher school where seven grades are represented. It will 
be shown how by alternation, combination, and elimination the number of classes 
can be reduced to the least possible number. The course of study for Maryland 
will be the basis upon which the program will be built. Attention will be given 
to seat work, the recreation period, and the vitalization of the rural school. 

Open only to those taking Course 20. 

22. The Principles of Elementary Teaching. Mr. Cooper. C 

11.30 A311 

This course will present the principles of teaching in their application to the 
state elementary course of study, including special methods in teaching the various 
subjects throughout the grades. Review of subject matter will be made wherever 
necessary. The course is especially designed, in connection with Course 23, to 
meet the new legal requirement of persons wishing to secure the minimum 
preparation for teaching. 

Texts: Strayer and Norsworthy, How to Teach (Macmillan) ; Kendall and 
Mirick, How to Teach the Fundamental Subjects (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

23. School Law and School Management. Supt. Holloway. C 

12.30 A 311 

In close connection with Course 22 the problems of the organization of a school, 
program making, class and pupil management, text-books, supplies and apparatus, 
care and supervision of school property, the legal duties of teachers, trustees and 
school boards, as officers of the state, contracts, records and reports will be 
studied so as to meet the needs of persons wishing to secure the minimum prepara- 
tion for teaching. The work will be based on the Maryland School Law and 
Elementary Course of Study. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Practical Writing. Dr. Powell. C 10.30 A 312 

The fundamental aim of this course will be to cultivate both clear thinking 
and accurate and to some extent artistic writing. An effort will be made to 
treat each student individually, and by personal conferences to develop any latent 
ability for literary work. Representative prose and poetry will be used as texts 
for study. 

2. Advanced Composition. Dr. Powell. C 8.30 A 312 

The chief feature of this course will be the study of the construction of a well- 
organized and logical essay. It will include constant practice of the organiza- 
tion, writing, and criticism of short essays. 

The work of this class will be practically identical with that of the second 
semester of the first-year collegiate program. 

3. Elements of English Composition. Dr. Becker. 8.30 A 100 

The plan of this course provides for a systematic review of the fundamental 
principles of English composition. The subject will be considered from the view 
point of both teacher and pupil. Frequent exercises in writing will form the 
basis for class discussion and personal conference. 

4. English Grammar. Dr. Becker. 10.30 A 100 

A review of the essentials, with special regard to the needs of teachers of 
the subject. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Wordsworth and Coleridge. Professor Ttjpper. G 9.30 A 320 

A minute study of the waitings of these authors, with considerable outside 
reading. 

Texts: Wordsworth's Poetical Works, ed. Hutchinson (Oxford University Press) ; 
The Poetical Works of Coleridge, ed. Coleridge (Oxford University Press). 

2. English Drama. Professor Tupper. G 12.30 A 320 

A study of the development of the English drama from the Restoration to 
Sheridan, including reports on special topics. 

Text: Representative English Dramas, ed. Tupper (Oxford University Press). 



16 Svmmer Courses [440 

3. Chaucer. Professor Tuppeb. G 8.30 A 212 

The reading of Chaucer will be used as a center of linguistic work in English. 
The course will be adapted to meet the needs of students of the English language. 

Texts: Ten Brink's The Language and Metre of Chaucer (Macmillan) ; Chaucer, 
The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, The Knightes Tale, The Nonnes Preestes 
Tale, ed. Liddell (Macmillan). 

4. English Literature, 1775-1892. Dr. Powell. C 11.30 A 312 

This course will treat the leading literary works of the poets, novelists, and 
essayists in the Romantic and Victorian periods and will include some discussion 
of the writers themselves and the development of literarj' and philosophic thought. 
The course parallels the second half of English Literature 4 in the collegiate 
program. 

FINE ARTS 

The courses in Fine Arts are given in cooperation with the Mary- 
land Institute, of Baltimore, and constitute the second summer session 
of its School of Art and Design. The instruction will be given at 
Homewood, where the special facilities for out-of-door work in the 
practical courses will be constantly used. Students matriculated as 
candidates for a baccalaureate degree may offer these courses, as 
indicated, for credit. Registration in these courses is subject to the 
approval of Director Turner. 

1. Life and Portrait. Director Turner and Mr, Webb. C 9.30- 

11.20 C 120 

In this course an opportunity is afforded advanced students to draw and paint 

from the model for composition, or head and figure painting in oil, or charcoal 

drawing. The work in this course leads to magazine illustration, mural painting, 
and portraiture. 

2. Life and Poetbait. Director Tubnee and Mr. Webb. C 11.30- 

1.20 C 120 
A continuation of Course 1. Students may elect Fine Arts 1 and 2 jointly 
or separately. 

3. Landscape and Still-Life in Oil Painting. Mr. Roben. C 

9.30-11.20 M202 

This course is designed for students in fine arts who desire drawing in color 
to lead to more advanced work, or to specialize in out-of-door painting. 

The abundant variety of views about the University grounds and near-by points 
of interest will be utilized on all pleasant days ; otherwise, the study will consist 
of still-life or flowers indoors. 

4. Landscape and Still-Life in Oil Painting. Mr. Roben. C 

11.30-1.20. M202 
A continuation of Course 3. Students may elect Fine Arts 3 and 4 jointly 
or separately. 

5. Landscape Sketching, Watee Coloe. Miss Stewaet. C 11.30- 

1.20 M 206 

This course is designed for advanced students in Fine Arts, and deals with 
nature studies made on the grounds of the University, in which different methods 
of handling the medium of water colors will be given. 

6. Elementaey School Coloe Woek. Miss Stewaet. C 9.30- 

11.20 M206 

This course provides practice with color work throughout the grades in the 
elementary school. The objects used will be flowers and still life of familiar 
forms, the selection of material being adapted to meet school needs. 

7. The Theoey and Peactice of Teaching Aet. Mr. Sax. C 

9.30-11.20 M119 

This course deals with practical art problems of the class room in both ele- 
mentary and secondary schools. It is designed to meet the needs of those who 
are preparing to become supervisors of art. It will also give special aid to grade 
teachers who desire further training in teaching art. A class of pupils will be 
available for class practice in teaching art. Lectures, papers, reading, and 
practice teaching. 



Wlv. 




— 4j 




443] Courses of Instruction 19 

8. Principles of Design. Mr. Sax. C 11.30 M 116 

The principles that underlie all applications of design will form the subject- 
matter of this course. They will be studied first in the abstract, and then in 
nature and historical ornament from the point of view of their application. The 
course will include studio work, lectures, and reports on required reading. 

This course is open to those who have completed the first year's work at the 
Maryland Institute, or who have had equivalent training, and also to those taking 
the Theory and Practice of Teaching Art. 

9. Principles of Design. Mr. Sax. C 12.30 M 116 

This elementary course on the principles of design is open to beginners, and 
will include studies in space filling, arrangement in straight and curved lines, 
distribution of light and dark, and color arrangements. 

10. Drawing. Mr. Conlon. C 10.30-12.20 C 214 

This course in drawing is designed for those who wish to teach drawing and 
desire to add to their methods of instruction in the Fine Arts. 

11. Elementary Drawing. Mr. Conlon. 8.30-10.20 C 214 

This course in drawing is designed for those who have had no instruction in 
the subject. 

The regular tuition fee for the courses in Fine Arts is $10, upon payment of 
which students may elect from one to four hours of instruction. Students regu- 
larly registering in courses in other departments are permitted to elect one or 
two hours of work in this department upon the payment of an additional fee of 
$5. It should be noted that of the double-period courses a one-hour period may 
be taken in Courses 6, 10, and 11 ; in all other courses, the minimum period is 
two hours. Changes in the schedule may be made to meet the convenience of a 
majority of the students. Excepting Courses 8 and 9, academic credit will be 
allowed only for the satisfactory completion of a double-period course. 

FRENCH 

1. The Romantic Period. Dr. Grtjenbaum. G and C 12.30 A 205 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility in reading 
modern French. The minimum of preparation for entrance is the work outlined 
for Course 2. Lectures in French, collateral readings, and composition. Ad- 
vanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Chateaubriand, Atala (Heath) ; Hugo, Hernani (American Book Com- 
pany) ; Hugo, Quatre-vingt-treize (Heath) ; Lamartine, Graziella (Heath) ; Musset, 
Trois Comedies (Heath) ; Canfield, French Lyrics (Holt) ; Comfort, French Prose 
Composition (Heath). 

2. Readings in French. Dr. Grtjenbaum. C 11.30 A 205 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent of Course 3. 
Work in composition will accompany the reading of modern French prose. 

Texts: Dumas, Le Chevalier de Maison-Rouge (American Book Company) ; Mau- 
passant, Short Stories, ed. Brush (Holt) ; Daudet, Tartarin de Tarascon, ed. Cerf 
(Ginn) ; Talbot, French Composition (Sanborn). 

3. Elementary French. Dr. Grtjenbaum. C 10.30 A 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
will consist of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, com- 
position, and careful reading of texts. 

Texts: Aldrich and Foster, Foundations of French . (Ginn) ; Malot, Sans Famille, 
ed. Spiers (Heath) ; About, La Mere de la Marquise, ed. Brush (Heath). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as partial ful- 
filment of the entrance requirements in French. 

GEOGRAPHY 
1. Physical Geography. Mr. Thompson. C 11.30 C5 

A brief survey of the materials of the earth's crust will be followed by a 
study of the physical features of the earth's surface and the process by which they 
have been developed, and of the factors of climate and weather. The influence 
of these physical factors of environment on the life of man will be emphasized. 
Field trips may be taken to study the physiographic features of the Baltimore 
region. 

Text: Salisbury, Physiography, Briefer Course, (Holt). 



20 Summer Courses [444 

2. Economic and Commercial Geography. Mr. Thompson. C 
9.30 C5 

A review of the elements of man's physical environment will be followed by a 
study of the influence of geographic factors in the development of civilization and 
especially of commerce and industry, as shown by a survey of some of the principal 
products, transportation routes, and foreign trade relations of the United States. 
Attention will be given to geographic influences in history. No prerequisites, 
but it is desired that the student shall have a knowledge of the elements of 
physical geography. 

Note — The courses in geography will be organized in such a way that they 
should be of value either to the general student or to teachers of geography in the 
elementary or high schools. 

GERMAN 

1. The Period of "Sturm und Drang" in German Literature, 

1772-1785. Professor Wood. G. 10.30 A 216 

2. (a) Chapters in the History of German Literary Style, 

Beginning with the Period of Lessing. Professor Wood. 
G 8.30 A 216 

The stylistic characteristics of the classical period of Goethe and Schiller, of 
German Romanticism, Das Junge Deutschland, the dramatic theories of Hebbel 
and Otto Ludwig, the technic of the German bourgeois novel (Freytag und Spiel- 
hagen), and the radical reforms of the Jungste Deutschland (Gerhart Hauptmann, 
etc.) will be considered. 

or, 

(b) Readings in Middle High German. Professor Wood. G 

Besides class readings in the Courtly Epic, the Volksepos and the Minnesong, 
the course will include a comparison between the Middle High German and the 
modern German lyric, as to form and content, and the relation of modern adapta- 
tions (Wagner's Ring der Nibelungen and Parsifal) to their originals. 

Note. — Choice between 2 (a) and 2 (b) will be dictated by the ascertained 
needs of those taking part in the course. 

3. Practical Exercises. Dr. Roulston. G and C 9.30 A 216 

The nature of this course will depend somewhat on the previous training of 
those who wish to follow it. A thorough knowledge of the grammar, together 
with the ability to read German quite fluently, will be presupposed. 

4. Readings in German. Dr. Roulston. C 8.30 A 103 

Intended for those who already have some knowledge of the language. Special 
attention will be paid to the acquisition of a reading vocabulary. 

Texts: Heyse, Vetter Gabriel, ed. Corwin (Holt) ; Meyer, Gustav Adolfs Page, 
ed. Roulston (Holt) ; Fontane, Grete Minde, ed. Thayer (Holt). 

5. Elementary German. Dr. Roulston. C 10.30 A 103 

In this course emphasis will be laid primarily on the grammar of the language. 
It will meet the needs of those beginning the language and of such as desire a 
thorough review in the grammar. 

Text: Vos, Essentials of German, 4th Edition, 1914 (Holt). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as partial ful- 
filment of the entrance requirements in German. 

HISTORY 

1. American History, 1763-1795. Professor Benton. G 10.30 A 305 

A study of the westward movement in the eighteenth century, including the 
elements of population in the westward migration, frontier society, influences 
of the frontier, British and early national policy toward the West. 

2. American History since 1783. Professor Benton. C 8.30 A 305 
A survey of American history during the national period with emphasis on the 

development of nationality, the influence of Hamilton, Jefferson, Jackson, Calhoun, 
Lincoln, Stevens, Roosevelt, and Wilson, the expansion of national domain, and 
new elements of population. 

Texts: Fish, The Development of American Nationality (American Book Com- 
pany) ; Farrand, The Framing of the Constitution (Yale University Press) ; Charn- 
wood, Life of Abraham Lincoln (London, Constable & Co.). 



445] Courses of Instruction 21 

3. European History from Charlemagne to the Eighteenth 

Century. Professor Benton. C 11.30 A 305 
A study of mediaeval civilization, the Empire, the Papacy, the Renaissance, the 
Reformation, and the rise of absolute monarchies. Special attention will be given 
to the methods of studying and of teaching the subject matter. 

Texts: Robinson, History of Western Europe ((Jinn) ; Robinson, Readings in 
European History, Volumes I and II (Ginn). 

4. Roman History. Associate Professor Canter. C 9.30 A 108 

This course will give a general survey of Roman History from the beginning 
through the reign of Augustus. Emphasis will be laid on the political and social 
aspects of the period. 

Texts: Pelham, Outlines of Roman History (Putnams) ; Frank, Roman Im- 
perialism (Macmillan) ; Collateral readings in Mommsen, Provinces of the Roman 
Empire (Scribners). 

See Classical Archaeology. For History of the Ancient East, see Semitics 5. 

LATIN 

1. The Teaching of Caesar in Secondary Schools. Associate 

Professor Canter. C 12.30 A 108 

Selections from the Gallic and Civil Wars. This is a teachers' course in which 
special attention will be given to the problems of Latin instruction in the second 
year ; also to the nature and use of illustrative materials, with a review and 
discussion of the most helpful literature bearing on Caesar as an author in sec- 
ondary schools. 

Text: Mather, Caesar, Gallic and Civil Wars (American Book Co.). 

2. Virgil : Aeneid I-VI. Associate Professor Canter. 8.30 A 108 
The work will cover the fourth year of high school Latin ; special attention 

will be directed to the literary and stylistic qualities of the Aeneid. 

Text: Knapp, Virgil, Aeneid (Scott, Foresman & Co.). 

Note. — Should there be a sufficient demand, this course will .become a teachers' 
course on Virgil, for which credit will be allowed. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

1. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. Mr. Gai- 

ther. C 8.30-10.20. M 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper 
elementary and lower secondary grades, the use of drawing instruments and 
making simple working drawings, outlining courses, planning equipment and 
methods of individual and class exercise. Advanced construction in both hard 
and soft woods will be available for advanced students. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 

2. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. C 10.30 M 

This course includes hand-work processes in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, 
basketry, bookbinding and woodwork suitable for the first six years of the ele- 
mentary schools, and in materials suitable for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will find this 
course adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

3. The Theory and Practice of Teaching Manual Arts. Mr. 

Gaither. C 11.30 M 

This course is designed to meet the needs of supervisors and teachers of 
Manual Arts, and will include study of aims and methods of manual training in 
elementary and secondary schools, planning courses, equipment of manual arts 
rooms, selection of materials, cost, and the special problems of supervision. 
Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing Courses 1 and 3 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore city schools, 
provided they are graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements 
to the secondary schools of Baltimore. 

MATHEMATICS 
1. Elliptic Functions. Associate Professor Coble. G 8.30 A 2 

The subject will be developed as it arises from the study of the elliptic integral. 
Pre-requisites : Differential and Integral Calculus. 



22 Summer Courses [446 

2. Projective Geometry and the Algebra of Forms. Associate 

Professor Coble. G 10.30 A 2 

Pre-requisite : Analytic Geometry. 

3. Analytic Geometry. Associate Professor Coble. C 11.30 A 2 
A study of the straight line, the parabola, differentiation of algebraic functions, 

curves and their tangents, with applications. 

4. Algebra. Associate Professor Coble. 12.30 A 2 

This course will cover algebra (b) for matriculation. In case of a larger 
demand for lectures on topics in elementary geometry suitable for teachers, the 
subject will be changed. 

MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, June twenty-fifth to* August fourth. In addition to instruc- 
tion in the departments of singing, piano, organ, violin, 'cello, and composition, 
its program includes a number of courses in public school music: A, Subject 
Matter ; B, Public School Music Methods ; C, History of Music and Musical 
Appreciation ; D, Chorus and School Orchestra ; E, Lectures and Discussions of 
Various Phases of Public School Music. 

These courses will be arranged in two groups— one for supervisors and directors 
of music or those wishing to prepare for such work, including B, C, D, and E ; 
the other for grade teachers, including A, B, and C. Candidates for the Uni- 
versity degree of Bachelor of Science may offer for credit the several courses in 
public school music when officially reported by the Conservatory as having been 
satisfactorily completed. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 

PHILOSOPHY 

1. Typical Views of Life. Dr. Slonimsky. G and C 10.30 A 113 

A study of the typical philosophies of life as manifested in the successive 
phases of the history of Western Civilization : Hebraism ; Hellenism ; Early 
Christianity ; the Mediaeval Outlook ; the Renaissance ; the Enlightenment of the 
Eighteenth Century ; Goethe ; Nietzsche and the reaction against morality ; 
William James and the theory of America. The presentation of the general 
historical and cultural background of each period will be followed by the de- 
tailed consideration of one or two classics representative of the period. Lectures, 
readings, and reports. 

2. Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy. Dr. Efros. G and C 12.30 A 101 

A preliminary treatment of Platonism, Aristotelianism, and Arabian Scholasti- 
cism as influencing the Jewish thinkers of the Middle Ages will lead to special 
study of the systems of Saadya, Gabirol, Maimonides, Gersonides, and Crescas, 
and a determination of their specific contribution to the History of Philosophy. 

See Courses in Semitics. 

PENMANSHIP 

1. Penmanship. Mr. London. A 8 

This course will be arranged in several sections so as to include primary, inter- 
mediate, and advanced work, and methods of teaching the muscular movement 
system. Attention will be given to corrective measures and suggestions for 
business penmanship. 

2. Methods of Teaching Penmanship. Mr. London. A 8 

This course is designed to meet the needs of supervisors and special teachers 
of the subject. 

Tuition fee: $2.50, for each course. 

PHYSICS 

1. Selected Topics in Thermodynamics. Professor Ames. G 9.30 

M104 

2. Aerodynamics. Professor Ames. G 11.30 M 104 

The physical principles of mechanical flight are discussed. A knowledge of 
advanced theoretical mechanics is a prerequisite. 

3. Mechanics and Heat. Associate Professor Pfund. C 8.30 MHO 

Lectures and laboratory. A knowledge of algebra and plane geometry is re- 
quired. 



447] Courses of Instruction 23 

4. Electricity and Magnetism. Associate Professor Pfund. C 

12.30 M 110 

Lectures and laboratory. 

5. Teachers' Course in General Physics. Professor Ames and 

Associate Professor Pfund. C 10.30 M 110 

A course designed for teachers in high schools. Manipulation and construction 
of simple apparatus for demonstration purposes will be taught ; the use of the 
lantern will be explained ; and, if there is a demand for instruction in photography, 
this will be given. 

Laboratory fee for Courses 1 and 2: $4.00, one or both. 

POLITICS 

1. International Relations. Dr. Millspaugh. G 8.30 A 320 

A study of Pan-Americanism from an historical and diplomatic point of view, 
including the special problems of international law and policy which affect the 
relations of the United States. Lectures, readings, and special reports. 

2. International Arbitration. Dr. Millspaugh. G and C 11.30 

A 320 

The fundamental relations between states, the causes of international differences, 
and the methods of conciliation and arbitration. Lectures, readings, and special 
reports. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Research in Psychology. Professor Dunlap. G A 401 

Opportunity for experimental work is offered to persons who are prepared to 
carry on independent investigations. The student may work on a problem which 
he has already under way, or a new problem will be assigned him. In any case, 
the student should communicate with the instructor as early as possible, in order 
that facilities for the work may be provided. 

2. Real and Apparent Problems in Psychology. Professor Dun- 

lap. G 11.30 A 401 

A discussion of topics of present interest : The attempt to deny consciousness ; 
the introspectionist, behaviorist, and scientific methods in psychology ; the re- 
action basis of perception and thought ; the nature of psychological measure- 
ments ; the possibility of mental tests ; the neural basis of the learning process ; 
the development of the instincts ; the function of the emotions ; the disciples of 
Freud ; the dual sex impulse ; the basis of modesty and morality ; the causes of 
dreams. 

P re-requisite: An elementary course in psychology. 

3. Training Course in Laboratory Psychology. Professor Dun- 

lap and Assistant. G 9.30-11.20 A 401 

There will be two divisions of this course: (a) for those who have had no 
laboratory work in psychology, — a series of fifty exercises covering the general 
methods of experimentation and observation, and demonstrating the most important 
phenomena of perception and judgment ; (b) for those who have had elementary 
work in laboratory psychology, — a series of twenty exercises in the rigorous appli- 
cation of experimental methods. 

Pre-requisite : An elementary course in psychology. 

4. Introduction to General Psychology. Professor Dunlap. C 

8.30 A 401 

This course is intended for those who have had no training in psychology, or 
who wish to review the elementary work. The essential facts and principles of 
analytical and functional psychology will be outlined in lectures, with demonstra- 
tions, supplemented by assigned reading. 

SEMITICS 

1. Critical Interpretation of the Hebrew Text of the Book of 

Jeremiah. Associate Professor Ember. G 8.30 A 116 
Text: Baer, Delitzsch edition of the Hebrew text of Jeremiah. 

2. Grammar of the Aramaic Idiom of the Babylonian Talmud. 

Associate Professor Ember. G and C 9.30 A 116 

The essentials of Talmudic grammar, the reading of numerous selections, and 
lectures on the origin and development of the Talmud. 



24 Summer Courses [448 

Text: Margolis, A Manual of the Aramaic Language of the Babylonian Talmud 
(Stechert, N°Y.) 

3 (a) Advanced Hebrew Grammar. Associate Professor Ember. 
G and C 10.30 A 116 

Texts: Gesenius-Kautzsch, Hebrew Grammar; Kautzsch, Uebungsbuch zur Hebra- 
ischen Grammatik von Gesenius-Kautzsch. 
or, 

(b) Elementary Arabic. Associate Professor Ember. G 

Text: Thatcher, Arabic Grammar (Brentano). 
OT, 

(c) Elementary Egyptian. Associate Professor Ember. G 
Egyptian grammar and interpretation of selected Hieroglyphic texts. The aim 

of the course is to enable the student to continue hieroglyphic studies without a 

teacher. 

4. {a) Elementary Hebrew. Dr. Blake. G and C. 10.30 A 117 

The principles of Hebrew grammar, and reading easy selections in Hebrew. 
Text: Davidson, Introductory Hebrew Grammar, 19th ed. (T. and T. Clark, 
Edinburgh. ) 
or, 

(b) Biblical Aramaic. Dr. Blake. G and C 

Grammar of the Aramaic idiom of the books of Ezra and Daniel and interpre- 
tation of the Aramaic passages. 
or, 

(c) Elementary Assyrian. Dr. Blake. G 

Assyrian grammar and interpretation of selected cuneiform texts. The aim of 
the course is to enable the student to continue cuneiform studies without a 
teacher. 

5. History of the Ancient East. Dr. Blake. G and C 8.30 A 117 

The history of Babylonia, Assyria, Persia, Israel, Judah, and the minor nations 
of Western Asia, preceded by an account of the Prehistoric Period. 
Text: Breasted, Ancient Times (Ginn). 

6. Literature of the Old Testament in the Light of Modern 

Critical Theories. Dr. Blake. G and C 9.30 A 117 

This course will include the history of the text of the Old Testament and the 
formation of the canon, the outlines of the documentary theory, and an account 
of the date, authorship, historical setting, purpose, etc. of the individual books 
of the Old Testament, supplemented by the reading and explanation of selected 
chapters on the basis of the English Bible. 

Text: Moore, The Literature of the Old Testament (Holt). 

Notk— A knowledge of Hebrew or any other Oriental language is not required 
for Courses 5 and 6. 

There are several copies of the text-books required in Courses 3 c, 4 6, and 4 c, 
available for the use of students in the University Library. 

(See Philosophy 2, for Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy.) 

SPANISH 
1. Advanced Spanish. Dr. Buceta. C 9.30 A 205 

(a) A practical course in written and spoken Spanish for those who have 
already acquiS the elements of the language. Spanish will be used exclusively 

i % t Sts C : a urph?ey, Spanish Prose Composition (American Book Co.); Bonilla, 
Spanish Daily Lih ^ Wson^ modern novel ^ 

dr£r?a, wHl l%vt°cZvo£^ conversation, ^ould confer with the instructor. 

2 Elementary Spanish, Dr. Buceta. C 10.30 A 206 

This course will include the essentials of Spanish f^^^Jl^l^ 'S3 
elementary texts. Special attention will be given to pronunciation ana orai 

"'TcIS': IngrahanvEdgren, Brief Spanish Grammar (Heath); Hills,- Spanish Tales 
for Beginners (Holt). 



SCHEDULE 



7.80— 8.20 

Education 12, Conference 

8.80—9.20 

Classical Archaeology 

Domestic Science 2 (8.30—10.20) 

Economics 1 

Education 3 

Education 6 

Education 8 

Education 17 

Education 18 

English Composition 2 

English Composition 3 

English Literature 3 

Fine Arts 11 (8.30—10.20) 

German 2 

German 4 

History 2 

Latin 2 

Manual Training 1 (8.30—10.20) 

Mathematics 1 

Physics 3 

Politics 1 

Psychology 4 

Semitics 1 

Semitics 5 

9.80—10.20 
Biology 1 
Chemistry 2 
Education 1 
Education 4 
Education 7 
Education 10 
Education 16 
Education 19 

Education 21 (9.30—11.20) 
English Literature 1 
Fine Arts 1 (9.30—11.20) 
Fine Arts 3 (9.30—11.20) 
Fine Arts 6 (9.30—11.20) 
Fine Arts 7 (9.30—11.20) 
Geography 2 
German 3 
History 4 
Physics 1 

Psychology 3 (9.30—11.20) 
Semitics 2 
Semitics 6 
Spanish 1 

10.30—11.20 

Chemistry 8 (10.30—1.20) 

Chemistry 4 (10.30—1.20) 

Domestic Science 1 (10.30—12.20) 

Economics 2 

Education 6 

Education 13 

English Composition 1 



English Composition 4 

Fine Arts 10 (10.30-^12.20) 

French 3 

German 1 

German 5 

History 1 

Manual Training 2 

Mathematics 2 

Philosophy 1 

Physics 5 

Semitics 3 

Semitics 4 

Spanish 2 

11.30—12.20 
Biology 3 
Chemistry 6 
Education 11 
Education 15 
Education 20 
Education 22 
English Literature 4 
Fine Arts 2 (11.30—1.20) 
Fine Arts 4 (11.30—1.20) 
Fine Arts 5 (11.30—1.20) 
Fine Arts 8 
French 2 
Geography 1 
History 3 

Manual Training 8 
Mathematics 3 
Physics 2 
Politics 2 
Psychology 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Chemistry 1 
Domestic Science 8 
Economics 3 
Education 2 
Education 9 
Education 14 
Education 23 
English Literature 2 
Fine Arts 9 
French 1 
Latin 1 
Mathematics 4 
Philosophy 2 
Physics 4 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 5 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Physical Laboratory 
Psychological Laboratory 



Penmanship: Hours to be arranged. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 315 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL- OF MEDICINE 

Degbee M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B. and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Open to Men and Women) 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND IN 

ENGINEERING 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



Forty-second year opens October 2, 1917 
For circulars address T. R. BALL, Registrar 



Series, 1918 Whole Number 303 

No. 3 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



EDITED BY 

THOMAS R. BALL 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 9 — AUGUST 16 
1918 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published ey the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

March, 1918 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Corgress of July 16, 1894 



Hlloeh State html JWan km 






CALENDAR, 1918 



June 11, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



r U ! y !M?i da ? I 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration, 

J«£ 8-Mo„ U da d y ay 1 Gil — Hal., HcLwood. 

July 9, Tuesday— 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 

begins. 

July 13, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 16, Friday — Close of Summer Courses. 



October 1, Tuesday — Forty-third regular session begins. 

October 7, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, tenth 'year begins. 

October 14, Monday — Evening Courses in Business Economics and in 
Engineering, third year begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, July 9, accord- 
ing to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that students 
should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening exercise 
of each course which they intend to pursue. 

Registration should be made prior to July 9, 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 
1918 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 
Director of the Summer Courses 

Thomas R. Ball, 
Registrar 

W. Graham Boyce, 
Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

Florence E. Bamberger, A. M. Elementary Education 

Associate in Education. 

Frank R. Blake, Ph. D. Semitics 

Associate in Oriental Languages. 

W. Perry Bradley Recreation 

Scout Executive, Baltimore Council Boy Scouts of America. 

Anna Brochhausen, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervising Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Educational Administration 

Professor of Education. 

Teresa Cohen, A. M. Mathematics 

Fellow in Mathematics. 

Harold F. Cottermax, A. M. Vocational Education 

Professor of Agricultural Education and Dean of the Division of Vocational 
Education, Maryland State College of Agriculture. 

Jessie M. Ebaugh. A. B. Secondary Education 

Instructor, Franklin High School, Reisterstown, Md. 

Herman L. Ebeling, Ph. D. History and Latin 

Associate Professor of Greek and Instructor in Latin, Goucher Colleee 

53] 1 



2 Summer Courses [54 

Lynn A. Emerson, E. E. Vocational Education 

Professor of Trade and Industrial Education, Maryland State College of Agri- 
culture. 

Howard E. Enders, Ph. D. Biology 

Professor of Zoology and Head of General Biology, Purdue University. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Clare E. Griffin, A. M. Economics 

Instructor in Transportation. 

George R. Havens, Ph. D. French and Spanish 

Instructor in Romance Languages, Indiana University. 

Dorris S. Hough, A. B. Recreation 

National Field Captain, National Headquarters Girl Scouts. 

Alvey M. Isanogle, A. B. Secondary Education 

Instructor, Thurmont High School, Maryland. 

Buford J. Johnson, Ph. D. Education and Psychology 

Bureau of Educational Experiments, New York. 

Edwin J. Kohl, S. M. Biology 

Instructor in Biology, Purdue University. 

John H. Latan6, Ph. D. History 

Professor of American History. 

Arthur C. Millspaugh, Ph. D. Politics 

Instructor in Political Science. 
Robert L. Ramsay, Ph. D. English 

Associate Professor of English, University of Missouri. 

Henry A. Roben Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate Professor of German. 

Carol M. Sax Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Blanche E. Shaffer, S. B. Home Economics 

Instructor in Marketing, and Assistant in Household Chemistry, Teachers 
College, Columbia University. 

Sarah E. Simons, A. M. Secondary Education 

Head of Department of English, High Schools, The District of Columbia. 



55] 



Instructors 



Henry Slonimsky, Ph. D. 

Associate in Philosophy. 

Eugene R. Smith, A. M. 

Headmaster of the Park School, Baltimore. 

Edith H. Stewart 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Robert A. Stewart, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

John E. Uhler, A. B. 

Assistant in English. 

David E. Weglein, Ph. D. 



3 

Philosophy 

Secondary Education 

Fine Arts 

Spanish and French 

English 

Secondary Education 



Instructor in Education ; Principal of Western High School, Baltimore. 



Effie M. Williamson, S. B. 

Primary Supervisor, Dorchester County, Maryland. 



Elementary Education 

Vocational Education 
Vocational Education 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 



Grade IV 
Grade V 
Grade VI 
Grade VII 
Grade VIII 



Gilman Hall 8 

Gilman Hall 9 

Gilman Hall 112 

Gilman Hall 311 

Gilman Hall 314 



Practice Class in Teaching Art 



Mechanical Engineering 119 



Summer Courses [56 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The eighth year of the Summer 'Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Tuesday, July 9, and continue until Friday, 
August 16, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be held every 
week-day, Monday to Friday. In addition, on Saturday, July 13, 
classes will meet as usual. Each course will consist of thirty class 
exercises or their equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will be 
additional. Examinations will be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Faculties, they are an integral part of 
the work of the University. All the resources of the institution 
essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses 
offered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate 
students who wish to advance their standing or to make up 
deficiencies ; others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in 
part the entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs of 
schools. War-time conditions will be especially considered in a 
number of courses. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing 
graduate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced 
to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular 
class exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work 
of the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs of 
individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

In cooperation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners 
a free elementary school, including the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh 
and eighth grades, will be conducted as a means of affording illustra- 
tive material for the courses in elementary education. This will be 
one of the city vacation schools in which pupils will be given an 
opportunity to make up deficiencies and to secure promotion at the 
beginning of the next school year. 

Four other city elementary and four secondary vacation schools, 
including possibly a vocational school, will be open during the 
session and available for observation in connection with the courses 
in elementary and secondary education. 

A class of (pupils will be available for class practice in connection 
with the course on the theory and practice of teaching art. 



5 i I General Statement 



SELECTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for advanced degrees should arrange their programs 
in consultation with the departments in which their principal sub- 
jects lie. New students expecting to become candidates should pre- 
sent their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
College Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, 
in the selection of courses that will meet the requirements of the 
registration for the degree. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the 
regulations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners 
to which their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with the rule 
of the Board of University studies: the requirement of one of the 
two years of residence for this degree may be met by attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for any of the baccalaureate 
degrees will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those 
courses designated by C. In general the same credit is given per 
hour as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two " points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an 
additional credit to exceed fifty per cent be given, nor can a total 
credit of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer 
session. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 
cates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, County, and City Superintendents and 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 9, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. The Registrar's office (219 
Oilman Hall) will be open for registration on Friday, July 5, Satur- 
day, July 6. Monday, July 8. and Tuesday, July 9, from 9 a. m. to 
5 p. m. After July 11, admission to each course will be restricted 



6 Summer Courses [58 

to registered students. With the consent of the Director, students 
may make changes in their courses, which must he reported in person 
to the Registrar, up to and including July 11. After this date no 
change of courses will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory fees, must 
be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in registration. 

NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles Street at 32nd and 34th Streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line, cars marked "Guilford-Union 
Station "; from the !Mt. Royal Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by walking 
two blocks east to Charles Street, and from Union Station (Pa., 
N". C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles Street, 
marked "Roland Park" or "Guilford-Union Station;" and also by 
the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles Street. One should alight 
at 32nd or 34th Street. 

EXPENSES 

The regular tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. An additional course, 
with the exceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may 
be attended, with the approval of the Director, upon the payment 
of an extra fee of $10.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a 
student may register in one course only, the tuition fee in such 
case being $15.) 

The tuition fee for teachers employed in public schools in Mary- 
land, as evidenced by superintendent's certificates, is $12.50, payment 
of which entitles such persons to register in two or three courses. 

The fees for the courses in Fine Arts and Recreation will be found 
in the statements of these courses, respectively. Additional fees are 
required for materials used in some of the courses. (For details, 
see statements of courses.) 

The fee for the use of the tennis courts at the athletic field, 
including towel service, is $2.00. The use of the campus tennis 
courts is free. 

No reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance; nor for 
withdrawal, except on account of serious personal illness. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn for the 
exact amount to the order of the Johns Hopkins University. For 
the convenience of students while in residence at the University, the 
Treasurer will receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment 
upon collection. There is no charge for this service other than the 
exchange. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

The University has no dormitories. Comfortable furnished rooms 
in private homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent 



" 









. 




61] 



General Statement 



at prices ranging from $2.00 to $3.50 per week for a single room, and 
$4.U0 to $7.00 a week for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in 
private boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging 
from $5.00 to $7.50 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodging 
houses will be sent upon request. The lunch room in the Student 
Activities Building on the campus will be open daily during the 
session. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening 
and closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and 
recitals which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday 
evening, in cooperation with the Summer Session of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 

excursions 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

THE UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE AND BOOK-STORE 

The University post-office, in Gilman Hall, will be open. Students 
may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book-Store (102 Gilman Hall) supplies 
officers and students with text books, stationery, and other materials 
at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. (Office. 303 Gilman Hall). 



10 Summer Courses [62 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 

1 General Biology. Professor Enders and Assistant. C 9.30 
G 11* 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
anct comparison, with the aid of the microscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex The lectures will deal with 
the manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and will point 
out our present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Maomillan) ; Enders, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology. 

2. Zoology. Professor Enders. iC 12.30 G 11 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior of 
these animals as well as their structure will be studied, including occasional field 
excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming better 
acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures will supplement for the 
most part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures will be devoted to the 
more general problems of zoological science. 

Texts: Hegner, College Zoology (Macmillan) ; Pratt, Invertebrate Zoology (Gmn). 

3. The Teaching of Botany in Secondary Schools. Professor 

Enders and Assistant. C 11.30 G 11 

The course will include laboratory study of plant material with reference to the 
needs of secondary schools, and a consideration of methods of teaching botany. 

Laboratory fee: $1.00, for each course. 

NoTE ._Students who completed any of the courses in Biology in former summers 
and desire to continue in this subject will be assigned new work, for which credit 
will be allowed. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. G 10.30 C 114 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students and those who wish 
to prepare for entrance into the Medical School. ,,.„„, 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Noms, Organic Chemistry (McGraw 
Hill Book Co.) 

2. Household and Textile Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 1.30 

C 114 

This course is intended for those who have taken elementary courses in chemistry 
and domestic science. In addition to a discussion of the general principles of 
organic chemistry, such subjects as fuels, combustion, oxidation, water Cits 
purification and analysis), food principles, preparation and testing of foods, soaps, 
chemical nature of fabrics, principles of dyeing, cleansing agents, etc., will be 

^Intife laboratory the work will follow the line of household or textile chemistry, 
as the student may elect. 

3. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 

11.30 C 114 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It wiK include, 
as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the more important non-metallic 



* Buildings: G, Gilman Hall; C, Civil Engineering; M, Mechanical Engineering; 
S, Student Activities. 



63] Courses of Instruction 11 

and metallic elements and their properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer Course) 
will be used as a basis for the class-room and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fees: $5.00 for one course, or for morning or afternoon work; $8.00 
for two courses or for work all day. (The fee for materials does not include the 
cost of small pieces of apparatus not returnable, and the charge for breakage to be 
paid at the close of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00). 

DOMESTIC ART AND SCIENCE 
(See courses in Home Economics and Vocational Education.) 

ECONOMICS 

1. Economic History of the United States. Mr. Griffin. G and 

C 10.30 G 323 

The course will be conducted largely as a course in reading from the sources 
supplemented by lectures and discussion. Special attention will be given to some 
of the latter-day problems of American economic life. An attempt will be made 
to meet the needs of teachers of history, civics and commerce. 

Text: Bogart, Economic History of the United States (Longmans Green & Co.). 

2. Money and Banking. Mr. Griffin. C 8.30 G 323 

A survey of the theory of money and of the history, theory and mechanism of 
banking. 'Special attention will be given to the Federal Reserve system, foreign 
exchange and v the relations of banks to government credit operations. 

Text: Holdsworth, Money and Banking (Appleton). 

3. Elements of Economics. Mr. Griffin. C 11.30 G 323 . 
A study will be made of the principles of economics and the application of those 

principles to everyday life will be noted. 

Text: Ely, Outlines of Economics (Macmillan). 

EDUCATION 

1. Experimental Education. Dr. Johnson. G 9.30 G 401 

This course deals with psycho-educational processes in action from the scientific 
point of view, and is based upon a comparative study of investigations in educa- 
tional research. Emphasis will be placed on methods of approaching educational 
problems and the application and evaluation of measuring scales and mental^ tests. 
Researches will be undertaken in those problems which can be approached in the 
time limits of the session. 

Lectures, demonstrations, experiments, and special reports. 

2. Educational Psychology. Dr. Johnson. G and C 12.30 G 320 

This course begins with a consideration of the aims and technique of general and 
experimental psychology and emphasizes the study of the development of mental 
traits and individual differences throughout childhood and adolescence. Work is 
carried on by means of lectures, texts, reports, . demonstrations, and elementary 
experiments. 

3. Educational Administration. Professor Buchner. G and C 

10.30 G 216 

The course will present a survey of the present status, tendencies, and problems 
of public education in the United States from the standpoint of the needs of 
State, county, and city systems. Each member of the class will be expected to 
select a specific problem for special investigation and report. 

Secondary Education 

4. Secondary School Organization and Classroom Management. 

Dr. Weglein. G and C 11.30 G 310 

This course will deal with some of the principal topics related to the organization 



12 Summer Courses [64 

and administration of secondary schools ; the historical development and function 
of the American high school ; comparisons with secondary schools in other countries ; 
the main problems connected with the program of studies ; the junior high school ; 
extra class-room activities ; supervised study ; methods of instruction. 
Lectures, required readings, and reports. 

5. The Teaching of Literature in Secondary Schools. Miss 

(Simons. G and C 8.30 G 310 

In this course special consideration will be given to the principles guiding the 
selection of material, including the pupil's part in the choice, methods of instruc- 
tion, and the equipment of the English classroom. Among the topics treated will 
be: oral reading, use of current periodicals, war poems, pamphlets and fiction, 
American literature, the development of appreciation, conscious imitation, dramati- 
zation, versification, and group activity. Pupils' work will be used as illustrative 
material. Reports on the literature on the reorganization of English in secondary 
schools will be required. 

6. The Teaching of English Composition in Secondary Schools. 

Miss Simons. G and C 9.30 G 310 

The aims, materials and methods of teaching English Composition will be 
considered with reference to the English work in the grades and the new modes of 
attacking the problem in the secondary school. The course will include such topics 
as: English in the junior high school, co-operation with the pupil and his respon- 
sibility, oral work and voice improvement, the assignment and supervised study, 
the conference, the club plan and socialization, correction of written work and 
use of standard scales. Specimen compositions will be handled. Members of the 
class are requested to bring sets of compositions for such use. The work will 
include reports on special readings. 

7. The Teaching of History in Secondary Schools. Mr. Isanogle. 

G and C 12.30 G 305 

This course will review the development of history as a school subject, and 
compare history programs and methods of study. Special attention will be given 
to practical exercises in making charts, maps and outlines and the use of these 
with pictures, sources, reference reading, and local historic interests available in 
the average community for vitalizing the instruction. The use of interest in the 
industries and in contemporary events will be considered as a means of enriching 
the history course. The scope of the work will include history instruction in the 
grammar grades as well as in the secondary school, and provision will be made for 
individual interests. 

Lectures, readings, and type lessons. 

8. The Teaching of Latin in Secondary Schools. Miss Ebaugh. 

G and C 10.30 G 108 

This course will deal with the problems of Latin instruction in the four years 
of the high school, including a comparative study of methods, and the correlation 
of Latin with the other subjects of the curriculum. Attention will be given to the 
special literature on the subject and to the examination and criticism of text-books. 
Each student is requested to bring with him whatever high school Latin text-books 
he may have. 

Lectures, practical demonstrations, and reports. 

9. The Teaching of Algebra in Secondary Schools. Mr. Smith. 

G and C 11.30 G 103 

This course will include a study of the educational values of algebra, its place 
in the curriculum, criteria to be used in choosing a text-book, the topics that 
should be taught in each year of the course, classroom methods, how a pupil should 
study the subject, the use of practice tests and standardized tests, and examinations 
and their marking. The reports of various committees and other literature on the 
subject will be used. 

10. The Teaching of Geometry in Secondary Schools. Mr. 
Smith. G and C 9.30 G 103 

The reasons for teaching geometry, a comparison of different methods, with 
practice in various types of class work, text-book criticism, teaching pupils to 



65] Courses of Instruction 13 

study effectively, standardized tests, and the making and marking of examinations 
will be taken up. 

The report of the National Committee of Fifteen and the most important current 
literature on the subject will be used. 

Text: Smith, Plane Geometry (American Book Co.). 

For other courses on teaching secondary subjects, see Biology 3, Fine Arts 4 
and 6, Manual Training 3, and Vocational Education 1, 3, 5 and 7. 

Elementary Education 

11. Elementary Demonstration School. Miss Bamberger, Miss 

Brochhausen, and Miss Williamson. C 7.30 G 110 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching process 
in elementary schools by means of systematic observation, conference reports and 
discussions. The school will include classses of the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, 
and eighth grades, and will be in session from 8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. These 
classes are open for observation to those registered for this course. The observation 
of the teaching will begin Monday, July 15. 

The requirement of those taking the course for credit is one conference (7.30 
a. m.), and four observation hours per week, and two written reports. 

12. Elementary School Supervision. Miss Bamberger. G and C 

10.30 G 320 

This study of the professional duties of the supervisor and the supervising 
principal will include as its chief topics principles of curriculum making, programs 
and lesson plans, criticism of instruction, and the improvement of teachers in 
service. Discussions will be based upon lesson plans in actual use and on observa- 
tions in the Elementary Demonstration School. 

13. School Management and School Law. Miss Williamson. 

C 9.30 G 320 

This course is designed primarily to meet the needs of principals of town, 
village and rural schools, but will be adapted to meet the individual interests of 
assistant and rural teachers. It will include a study of the factors Which limit 
the teaching process and are under the control of the school, the management of 
the several phases of the school's environment, efficiency in routine organization 
and the adjustment of programs, classes, and grades, the problems of school 
attendance and school progress of children, the organization of school clubs and 
improvement associations and school exhibits, and the State school law in its 
relation to the affairs of the school. 

14. Grammar Grade Methods. Miss Bamberger. C 8.30 G 320 

This course will present the theory and practice of teaching the various subjects 
in the last four years of the elementary school. Topics to be considered will 
include the selection of subject matter, the method of instruction, and the manage- 
ment of children. Discussions will be based upon observation of lessons in the 
Elementary Demonstration School. Outside reading and written reports. 

15. Primary Grade Methods. Miss Brochhausen. C 8.30 G315 

By means of lectures and discussions this course will consider the problems 
peculiar to the first four years of the elementary school. The subject matter for 
each grade will be outlined, and effective methods for presenting the material will 
be given. The course will be developed in connection with observation in the 
Elementary Demonstration School. Outside reading and reports. 

Text: Strayer, A Brief Course in the Teaching Process (Macmillan). 

16. The Teaching of English in the Elementary School. Miss 

Brochhausen. C 9.30 G 315 

The course of lectures, reports, and discussions will be devoted to the teaching 
of English in the eight grades of the elementary school. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon the teaching of oral and written composition, the correlation between 
composition and literature, and the relation of spelling and grammar to composi- 
tion. Systematic observation in the Elementary Demonstration School will form a 
part of the work of the course. Outside reading will be required. 

Text: Leonard, English Composition as a Social Problem (Houghton Mifflin Co.) 



14 



Summer Courses [66 



17. Story Telling. Miss Brochhausen. € 11.30 G 315 

This course will consist of discussions and practice in story telling. Such topics 
as the choice of the story, the preparation of the story, and the use to be made oi 
the story will be discussed. Outside reading will be required. 

Text: Shedlock, The Art of Story Telling (Appleton). 

18. The Teaching of Arithmetic and Geography in the Elemen- 

tary School. Miss Bamberger. C 11.30 G 320 

The first part of the course will deal with recent developments in the material 
and methods of teaching arithmetic in the eight grades of the elementary school. 
The fundamental processes, drill, and application of arithmetic to modern business 
will be considered. . , , . 

The aims, materials, and methods of teaching geography in the elementary school 
will be considered in the second part of the course. The preparation of lesson 
plans will receive attention. The course throughout will include observations in tne 
Elementary Demonstration School. Readings and written reports. 

19. Rural School Problems. Miss Williamson. C 12.30 G 315 

This study of the problems of the rural school will be conducted with reference 
to the needs of the individual teacher, and will include such topics as the purpose 
and use of text-books, lesson assignment and preparation, supervised study m the 
rural school, home lessons, seat work, and phases of subject-matter, with special 
exercises in the preparation of material helpful in teaching, such as schedules, 
outlines, lesson plans, and plans for term projects. Members of the class are 
requested to bring specimens of school work, class exercises, lesson plans and other 
material for co-operative use. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. The Short Story. Associate Professor Ramsay. C 10.30 

G 315 

Study and practice in the story and related forms of imaginative composition. 
Representative stories and dramas will be used as material for analysis and 
imitation. 

2. Description and Narration. Mr. Uhler. C 8.30 G 100 

The study and practice of those forms of prose writing that appeal primarily to 
the senses and the imagination. The work will include regular practice in writing 
and the analysis of selected models. 

3. Usage, Structure, and Style. Mr. Uhler. C 12.30 G 100 

In this course attention will be paid to the conventions of written English and 
to the principles of clear and effective writing. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1 Recent English Literature. Associate Professor Ramsay. 
G and C 9.30 G 216 

A study of recent English and American poetry, drama, and fiction as reflecting 
the conflict between the spirits of imperialism, nationalism, and regionalism which 
preceded and prepared the way for the present world war. 

Lectures and reports, with a large amount of outside reading. 

2. The Elizabethan Drama. Associate Professor Ramsay. G 

and C 12.30 G 212 

A study of the development of English drama from the opening of Elizabeth's 
reign down to the death of Shakspere, as illustrated in the work of Shakspere s 
precursors and contemporaries. 

Text: The Chief Elizabethan Dramatists, ed. W. A. Neilson (Houghton 
Mifflin Co.). 

3. History of English Literature, 1600-1775. Mr. Uhler. C 

11.30 G 100 

A survey of the literature of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Special 






07] Courses of Instruction 15 

attention will be paid to the English Bible, Milton, Addison, Swift, Pope, Gray 
and Goldsmith. 

Text: Century Readings in English Literature, ed. CunlirYe, Pyre and Young. 
(Century Co.). 

FINE ARTS 

The courses in Fine Arts are given in co-operation with the 
Maryland Institute, of Baltimore, and constitute the third summer 
session of its School of Art and Design. The instruction will he given 
at Homewood, where the special facilities for out-of-door work in 
the practical courses will be constantly used. Students matriculated 
as candidates for a baccalaureate degree may offer these courses, as 
indicated, for credit. Registration in these courses is subject to the 
approval of Miss Stewart. 

1. Portrait Painting. Mr. Roben. C 9.30-11.20 G 113 

In this course an opportunity is afforded advanced students to draw and paint 
from the model for composition, or head and figure painting in oil, or charcoal 
drawing. The work in this course leads to magazine illustration, mural painting, 
and portraiture. 

2. Landscape and Still-Life in Oil Painting. Mr. Roben. C 

11.30-1.20 G 113 

This course is designed for students in Fine Arts who desire drawing in color 
to lead to more advanced work, or to specialize in out-of-door painting. 

The abundant variety of views about the University grounds and nearby points 
of interest will be utilized on all pleasant days ; otherwise, the study will consist 
of still-life or flowers indoors. 

3. Principles of Design. Mr. Sax. C 11.30-1.20 M 116 

The principles that underlie all applications of design will form the subject 
matter of this course. They will be studied first in the abstract, and then in 
nature and historical ornament from the point of view of their application. The 
course will include studio work, lectures, and reports on required reading. 

This course is open to those who have completed the first year's work at the 
Maryland Institute, or who have had equivalent training, and also to those taking 
the Theory and Practice of Teaching Art. 

4. Theory and Practice of Teaching Art. Mr. Sax. C 9.30- 

11.20 M 119 

This course deals with practical art problems of the classroom in both elemen- 
tary and secondary schools. It is designed to meet the needs of those who are 
preparing to become supervisors of art. It will also give special aid to grade 
teachers who desire further training in teaching art. A class of pupils will be 
available for class practice in teaching. Lectures, papers, and reading, and practice 
teaching. 

5. Elementary School Color Work. Miss Stewart. € 9.30- 

11.20 S 

This course provides practice with color work throughout the grades in the 
elementary school. The objects used will be flowers and still life of familiar 
forms, with out-of-door sketching. 

6. Drawing. Miss Stewart. C 11.30-1.20 S 

This course in drawing is designed for those who wish to teach drawing and 
desire to add to their methods of instruction. 

The regular tuition fee for the courses in Fine Arts is $10, upon payment of 
which students may elect from one to four hours of instruction. Students regularly 
registering in courses in other departments are permitted to elect one or two hours 
of work in this department upon the payment of an additional fee of $5. 

Changes in the schedule may be made to meet the convenience of a majority of 
the students. Academic credit will be allowed only for the satisfactory completion 
of a double-period course. 



16 Summer Courses [68 

FRENCH 

1. Modern French Drama. Dr. Havens. G and C 12.30 G 205 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility in reading 
modern French. The minimum of preparation for entrance is the work outlined 
for Course 2. Lectures in French, collateral reading, composition, and reports in 
French. Advanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Dumas-fils, Le Demi-Monde; Augier, Le Gendre cle M. Poirier (Holt) : 
Becque, Les Corbeaux; Coppee, Pour la Couronne (Holt) ; Rostand, Cyrano de 
Bergerac (Holt) ; Brieux, La Robe rouge; Hervieu, La Course du Flambeau; 
Mirabeau, Les Affaires sont les Affaires; Lavedan, Le Duel (Holt); Maeterlinck, 
L'Oiseau bleu. 

2. Practical French. Dr. Havens. C 11.30 G 205 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent of French 3. 
The exercises of the class will be conducted in French. 

Texts: Talbot, Le Francais et sa patrie (Sanborn) ; Maupassant, Contes choisis, 
ed. Brush (Holt) ; Daudet, Tartarin de Taraseon, ed. Cerf (Ginn) ; Talbot, French 
Composition (Sanborn). 

3. Elementary French. Dr. Stewart. C 10.30 G 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
will consist of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, compo- 
sition, and careful reading of texts. 

Texts: Aldrich and Foster, Foundations of French (Ginn) ; Malot, Sans Famille, 
ed. Spiers (Heath) ; About, La Mere de la Marquise, ed. Brush (Heath). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as partial fulfil- 
ment of the entrance requirements in French. 

GERMAN 

1. German Literature from 1870 to 1900. Associate Professor 

Roulston. G 8.30 G 103 

In this course particular attention will be paid to the development of the 
drama and the novelle during this period. The influences of the founding of the 
Empire and of the various foreign literatures upon these two types will be especially 
studied. 

2. Advanced Prose Composition and Practical Exercises. 

Associate Professor Roulston. G and C 9.30 G 312 

Practice in translating from English and in writing original themes will be 
furnished by this course. Especial attention will be devoted to the study of idioms 
and to the differences between the spoken and the written language. 

3. (a) Readings in German. Associate Professor Roulston. 

C 10.30 G 312 

The nature of this course will depend upon the previous preparation of the 
students. 
or, 

(b) Elementary German. Associate Professor Roulston. 

A thorough review of the grammar will be given. This course will especially 
meet the needs of those who wish such a review while following more advanced 
courses. 

Note. — Texts will be announced at the opening of the session, a supply of books 
being available at the University Book-Store. 

HISTORY 

1. American History Since 1865. Professor Latan£. G 11,30 
G 305 

A seminary for advanced students on some of the more important problems that 
have arisen in American history since the Civil War. 



71] Courses of Instruction 19 

2. Latin-American History and Diplomacy. Professor Latan£. 

G and C 10.30 G 305 
A review of the Spanish colonial system, the wars of liberation, the recognition 
of the Spanish-American republics, and their subsequent relations with the rest of 
the world, particularly with the United States. 

3. Contemporary European History. Professor Latan£. C 

8.30 G 305 

A study of the antecedents of the great war — the expansion of Europe, commercial 
rivalries, alliances, ententes, military and naval systems. Each student is requested 
to order in advance one or both of. the following books: Herbert Adams Gibbons, 
The New Map of Europe (Century Co., 1914) ; Arthur Bullard, The Diplomacy of 
the Great War (Macmillan Co., 1916). 

4. Greek History. Associate Professor Ebeling. C 9.30 G 108 

This course will give a general survey of Greek history down to the conquest of 
Alexander. Care will be taken to follow the development of Greek political and 
social institutions. Library readings will be available. Lectures, reports, and 
discussions. 

Text: Bury, Student's History of Greece (Macmillan). 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Nutrition and War- Time Cookery. Miss Shaffer. C 11.30- 

1.20 M 114 

This course offers a special study of the functions and nutritive value of foods, 
the food requirements of the members of the family group, and the cost of the 
family dietary, based on present war conditions. The laboratory work will include 
the preparation of the meals planned. 

Pre-requisite : Elementary cookery. Parallel: Chemistry 1 or 2. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

2. Household Economics and Management. Miss Shaffer. C 

10.30 M 114 

The application of the principles of economics to the problems of the housewife 
will form the basis of this course. Scientific management, family budget and 
household accounts will be included. 

3. Textiles and Clothing. Miss Shaffer. C 8.30-10.20 M 121 

The selection and buying of household textiles and the care, cleaning, remodeling 
and repair of the different articles of clothing will be given in this course. The 
economic aspects will be considered with reference to the textile situation presented 
by present war conditions. Students will furnish their own materials. 

Pre-requisite or Parallel: Chemistry 2. 

For courses on teaching Home Economics and its vocational application, see 
Vocational Education 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

Note. — Under a recently adopted rule, graduates of the Baltimore Female High 
Schools, or of other schools of the same standard, who have collegiate credits 
in domestic science and other subjects aggregating sixty points, are eligible to 
take the examination for teachers of cooking in the Baltimore city schools. 

LATIN 

Latin Literature, from Earliest Beginnings to the End of the 
Second Century A. D. Associate Professor Ebeling. G 
and C 11.30 G 108 

This course is designed to give a comprehensive view of Latin literature at its 
best, and will consist of lectures and the reading of selected specimens of both 
prose and verse. Special attention will be directed to the origin and development 
of the several departments of Latin Literature. The greater part of the reading 



20 Summer Courses [72 

will be done in translation, but short passages in the original will be assigned from 
time to time. Facility in reading Latin will not be a pre-requisite. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Mackail, Latin Literature (Scribner's) ; Laing, Masterpieces of Latin 
Literature (Houghton Mifflin Co.) ; Oxford Book of Latin Verse (Clarendon Press). 

See Education 8 for a course on the Teaching of Latin in Secondary Schools. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

1. Bench Work in Wood and Mechanical Drawing. Mr Gai- 

ther. C 8.30-10.20 M 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper 
elementary and lower secondary grades, the use of drawing instruments and 
making simple working drawings, outlining courses, planning equipment and 
methods of individual and class exercise. Advanced construction in both hard 
and soft woods will be available for advanced students. Special attention will be 
paid to the needs of those who desire to prepare themselves for teaching the 
vocational applications of the subject. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 

2. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. C 11.30 M 

This course includes hand-work processes in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, 
basketry, bookbinding and woodwork suitable for the first six years of the ele- 
mentary schools, and in materials suitable for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will find this 
course adapted to thir needs. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

3. The Theory and Practice of Teaching Manual Arts. Mr. 

Gaither. € 10.30 M 

This course is designed to meet the needs of supervisors and teachers of 
Manual Arts, and will include study of aims and methods of manual training in 
elementary and secondary schools, planning courses, equipment of manual arts 
rooms, selection of materials, cost, and the special problems of supervision. Per- 
sons who have had practical vocational training only may qualify for admission 
to this course. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing Courses 1 and 3 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore city schools, 
provided they are graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements 
to the secondary schools of Baltimore. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Projective Geometry. Miss Cohen. G 10.30 G 2 

The subject will be treated from a geometric, rather than from an algebraic, 
point of view. 

Pre-requisite: Analytic Geometry. 

2. Analytic Geometry. Miss Cohen. C 11.30 G 2 

A study of the straight line and the conic. sections. 

3. Trigonometry. Miss Cohen. 12.30 G 2 

In case of sufficient demand algebra (b) will be substituted for this course. 

MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, July 8 to August 17. Its program includes courses in 
Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, Composition, Harmony, Form and Analysis, Interpre- 
tation, Piano Pedagogy, Theory, Ear Training, and Musical Literature. 



73] Courses of Instruction 21 

As in former years, candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science may 
offer for credit the courses in Harmony and in Form and Analysis, when officially 
reported by the Conservatory as having been satisfactorily completed. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 

PHILOSOPHY 

1. The Theory of Ethics, Dr. Slonimsky. G and C 11.30 

G 117 

The methods and types of ethical theory as they have appeared in the past will 
be reviewed ; a psychology of the moral experience will be presented ; and on the 
basis of that the attempt will be. made to work out an ethical theory from a revised 
standpoint. 

2. Philosophy of Religion. Dr. Slonimsky. G and C 9.30 

G 117 

After a review of the origin and growth of religion, and of the psychology of 
religious phenomena, the attempt will be made to define the relation of religion 
to philosophy and the place it should hold in our life. 

POLITICS 

1. Problems in International Law. Dr. Millspaugh. G 9.30 

G 324 

A critical study of the fundamental concepts of international law and interna- 
tional relations, the relation of international law to municipal law, sovereignty, 
jurisdiction, treaties, the practice of diplomacy, and the methods and limitations 
of arbitration. Lectures, readings, and reports. 

2. The American Electorate. Dr. Millspaugh. C 8.30 G 324 

This course will survey the recent tendencies of popular government and practical 
politics ; public opinion, civic organization, the suffrage, political parties, direct 
primaries, presidential nominations, elections, ballot reform, the civil service, the 
short ballot, the initiative and referendum, the recall, and independent voting. 

Text: Ray, An Introduction to Political Parties and Practical Politics, revised 
edition (Scribners). 

PSYCHOLOGY 

INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. Dr. JOHNSON. C 8.30 

G 401 

This course is intended for those who have had no training in psychology, or 
who wish to review the elementary work. The essential facts and principles of 
analytical and functional psychology will be outlined in lectures, with demonstra- 
tions, supplemented by assigned readings. 

RECREATION 

1. Recreational Leadership for Boys. Mr. Bradley and 
Assistants. C 5-7 G 311 

This course is given in co-operation with the Baltimore Council and the Depart- 
ment of Education of the National Council, Boy Scouts of America, and is designed 
to provide instruction and practice for those desiring to secure training as recrea- 
tional leaders. 

The topics will include the history and principles of scouting, the characteristics 
of adolescent boyhood, the content and organization of the boy scout program as 
first aid, signalling, scoutcraft, campcraft and games, and the community and civic 
aspects of scouting. The methods of practical application will be illustrated by 
demonstrations and field work with scout troops. 

Lectures, required readings, reports and field work. 



■)■) 



Summer Courses [74 



Texts: Richardson and Loomis, The Boy Scout Movement (Scribner) ; Handbook 
for Boys and Scoutmaster's Handbook (Boy Scouts of America). 
Tuition fee: $5.00, for students registering in this course alone. 

2. Recreational Leadership for Girls. Miss Hough and 
Assistants. 5-7 G 314 

This course, given in co-operation with the National Headquarters Girl Scouts, 
is designed to offer instruction and practice! for those interested in recreational 
leadership for girls or who desire' to secure training as captains of girl scout troops. 
The lectures will present the history and organization of the scout movement, 
the characteristics of adolescent girlhood, the principles and practice of scouting 
based on the program of activities, as first aid, signalling, games, woodcraft, camp 
organization and management, and its social and civic values. The course will 
include a large amount of practical work, demonstrations and field programs to 
illustrate the use of the Handbook and Manual and the organization and manage- 
ment of girl scout troops. 

Lectures, required readings, reports and field work. 

Tuition fee: $5.00, for students registering in this course alone. 

SEMITIC® 

1. {a) Elementary Hebrew. Dr. Blake, G and C 9.30 G 116 

The essential principles of Hebrew grammar, and the reading of easy selections 
in Hebrew. 

Text: Davidson, Introductory Hebrew Grammar, 19th ed. (T. and T. Clark, 
Edinburgh). 
or, 

( b ) Biblical Aramaic. Dr. Blake. G and C 

Grammar of the Aramaic idiom of the books of Ezra and Daniel, systematic 
study of the vocabulary, and interpretation of the Aramaic passages. 
or, 

(c) Elementary Assyrian. Dr. Blake. G 

Study of the Assyrian cuneiform characters, the elements of Assyrian grammar, 
and the interpretation of selected cuneiform texts. The aim of the course is to 
enable the student to continue cuneiform studies without a teacher. 

2. {a) History of the Ancient East. Dr. Blake. G and C 

8.30 G 117 

The history of Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, Persia, Israel, Judah, and the minor 
nations of Western Asia (Elam, Mitan, the Hittites, Urartu, Lydia, Phenicia, 
Damascus), preceded by an account of the Prehistoric Period. Lectures and 
readings from standard works. 
or, 

(b) Literature of the Old Testament in the Light of 
Modern Critical Theories. Dr. Blake. G and C 

This course will include the history of the text of the Old Testament and the 
formation of the canon, the outlines of the documentary theory, and an account 
of the date, authorship, historical setting, purpose, etc., of the individual books 
of the Old Testament, supplemented by the reading and explanation of selected 
chapters on the basis of the English Bible. 

Text: Moore, The Literature of the Old Testament (Holt). 

Note. — No knowledge of Hebrew or of any other Oriental language is required 
for the courses 2a or 25. 

There are several copies of the text-books required in lb arid 1c available for 
the use of students in the University Library. 

SPANISH 
1. Spanish Literature. Dr. Stewart. G and C 9.30 G 206 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility in reading 



75] Courses of Instruction 23 

Spanish. Lectures on Spanish literature and work in composition. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

Text: Alarc6n, El Capitdn Veneno (Heath) ; Perez Galdi5s, Dona Perfecta (Ginn) ; 
Valdez, Jose (Heath) ; Calderon, La Vida es Sueno (American Book Co.) ; 
Cervantes, Don Quixote (Heath). 

2. Practical Spanish. Dr. Stewart. C 8.30 G 206 

This course in written and spoken Spanish is intended for those who have had 
the equivalent of Spanish 3. Spanish will be used exclusively in the class-room. 
Attention will be given to such practical uses of the language as will meet the 
individual needs of the students. 

Texts: Umphrey, Spanish Prose Composition (American Book Co.) ; Bonilla, 
Spanish Daily Life (Nelson). 

3. Elementary Spanish. Dr. Havens. G 10.30 G 100 

This course will include the essentials of Spanish grammar and translation from 
elementary texts. Special attention will ■ be given to pronunciation and oral 
practice. 

Texts: Espinosa and Allen, Elementary Spanish Grammar (American Book Co.); 
Hills, Spanish Tales for Beginners (Holt). 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

The following courses in Vocational Education are offered in 
co-operation with the Maryland State College of Agriculture. They 
are designed to prepare teachers of agriculture, home economics, and 
trades and industry in the secondary schools of the type encouraged 
by the Smith-(Eughes Act and in accordance with the requirements 
of the Maryland State Board of Education. .These courses are open 
only to teachers of agriculture, home economics, and trades and 
industry, and to those who may be able to qualify as teachers in one 
of the three fields after having had the work of the courses, registra- 
tions being subject to the approval of Professor Cotterman. 

1. The Teaching of Vocational Agriculture. Professor Cotter- 

man. C 10.30 G 10 *, 

A study of the teaching of secondary vocational agricultural subjects, stressing 
particularly the purposes of such instruction, the selection, organization and 
presentation of subject matter, the organization of project activities, equipment, 
textbooks, and community relationships. 

2. Special Problems in Agriculture. Professor Ootterman. 

€ 2.30-4.20 G 10 

This course is designed to meet the needs of individual teachers, and offers a 
special study of the agricultural resources of various regions of the State with 
reference to the type of education that should be developed in particular secondary 
schools. The subjects of poultry production, truck gardening, dairying, agronomy, 
soils, farm management, and other community specialties will be selected and 
treated in light of the problems of the detailed content of school courses. 

3. The Teaching of Foods, Nutrition and Sanitation. C 3.30 

M 114 

This course will deal with the organization and curriculum of those subjects in 
secondary vocational schools, the selection and organization of subject matter of 
such courses, equipment, text-books, and lesson plans. 

4. Special Problems in Food Preparation and Dietetics. C 

8.30-10.20 M 114 

This course will deal with the selection, organization, and laboratory procedure 
involved in the presentation of selected topics in food preparation and dietetics as 
adapted to the needs of vocational schools and individual teachers. 



24 



Summer Courses 



[76 



5. The Teaching op Clothing, Textiles and House Furnishing. 

C 2.30 (M 121 

This course will deal with the problems of the organization of instruction in 
clothing, textiles and house furnishing, the arrangement of courses, equipment, 
text-books, and lesson plans. 

6. Special Problems in Dressmaking. C 11.30-1.20 M 121 

This course will include a consideration of quality, suitability, and cost of 
materials as adapted to the techniques involved in dressmaking, adaptation of art 
principles in selection of designs, instruction and practice in methods of construc- 
tion of selected projects in dressmaking. Students will furnish their own materials 
for special projects. 

7. Principles of Industrial Education and Management of 

Industrial Classes. Professor Emerson. C 12.30 G 10 

A study of trade and industrial education, stressing particularly types of schools, 
courses of study, lesson plans, shop methods, management, discipline, and 
co-operative plans. 

8. Special Problems in Trade and Industrial Education. 

Professor Emerson. C 2.30-4.20 G 2 

Special survey of trade and industrial conditions in Maryland, particularly in 
the City of Baltimore, with reference to the needs of vocational schools and 
individual teachers. 




THE BOTANICAL GARDEN 



SCHEDULE 



7.30—8.20 

Education 11 (Conference) 

3.30—9.20 

Economics 2 

Education 5 

Education 14 

Education 15 

English Composition 2 

German 1 

History 3 

Home Economics 3 (8.30—10.20) 

Manual Training 1 (8.30—10.20) 

Politics 2 

Psychology 

Semitics 2 

Spanish 2 

Vocational Education 4 (8.30 — 10.20) 



J.30— 10.20 

Biology 1 

Education 1 

Education 6 

Education 10 

Education 13 

Education 16 

English Literature 1 

Fine Arts 1 (9.30—11.20) 
(9.30—11.20) 
(9.30—11.20) 



Fine Arts 4 

Fine Arts 5 

German 2 

History 4 

Home Economics 3 (continued) 

Manual Training 1 (continued) 

Philosophy 2 

Politics 1 

Semitics 1 

Spanish 1 

Vocational Education 4 (continued) 



L0.30— 11. 



Chemistry 1 

Economics 1 

Education 3 

Education 8 

Education 12 

English Composition 1 

Fine Arts 1 (continued) 

Fine Arts 4 (continued) 

Fine Arts 5 (continued) 

French 3 

German 3 

History 2 

Home Economics 2 

Manual Training 3 

Mathematics 1 

Spanish 3 

Vocational Education 1 



11.30—12.20 

Biology 3 

Chemistry 3 

Economics 3 

Education 4 

Education 9 

Education 17 

Education 18 

English Literature 3 

Fine Arts 2 (11.30—1.20) 

Fine Arts 3 (11.30 — 1.20) 

Fine Arts 6 (11.30—1.20) 

French 2 

History 1 

Home Economics 1 (11.30 — 1.20) 

Latin Literature 

Manual Training 2 

Mathematics 2 

Philosophy 1 

Vocational Education 6 (11.30 — 1.20) 

12.30—1.20 

Biology 2 

Education 2 

Education 7 

Education 19 

English Composition 3 

English Literature 2 

Fine Arts 2 (continued) 

Fine Arts 3 (continued) 

Fine Arts 6 (continued) 

French 1 

Home Economics 1 (continued) 

Mathematics 3 

Vocational Education 6 (continued) 

Vocational Education 7 

1.30—2.20 

Chemistry 2 

2.30—3.20 

Vocational Education 5 

3.30—4.20 

Vocational Education 3 

2.30—4.20 



Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Vocational Education 2 
Vocational Education 8 



5.00—7.00 



Recreation 1 
Recreation 2 



8.30—12.30: Elementary Demonstration School. 
>bservation Monday, July 15.] 



[Classes will be open for 






THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 341 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degbees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Degree S. B. in Eng. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Degrees P. H. D., S. D., and S. B. in Hyg. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A.M., A. B. and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Not offered in 1918) 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND IN 

ENGINEERING 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



lew Series, 1919 Whole Number 313 

No. 3 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 8— AUGUST 15 
1919 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued Monthly from October to July 

March, 1919 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as Becond class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

d-jeptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1108, 
Act of October 8, 1917. Authorized en July 8, 1918 



CALENDAR, 1919 



June 24, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



July 5 — Saturday ) 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., Registration, 

July 7 — Monday { Gilman Hall, Homewood. 

July 8, Tuesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Course© 

begins. 

July 12, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 15, Friday — Close of Summer Courses. 



September 30, Tuesday — Forty-fourth regular session begins. 

October 6, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, eleventh year 
begins. 

October 13, Monday — Evening Courses in Business Economics and in 
Engineering, fourth year begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, July 8, accord- 
ing to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that students 
should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening exercise 
of each course which they intend to pursue. 

Registration should be made prior to July 8. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 

1919 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 

President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 

Director of the Summer Courses 

Thomas R. Ball, 
Registrar 

W. Graham Boyce, 
Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

Florence E. Bamberger, A. M. Elementary Education 

Associate in Education. 

Anna Brochhatjsen, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervising Principal, Indianapolis Public Schools. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Educational Administration 

Director ; Professor of Education. 

James M. Callahan, Ph. D. History 

Professor of History and Political Science, University of West Virginia. 

Teresa Cohen, Ph. D. Mathematics 

Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow, Wellesley College. 

Victor Dulac, A. M. French 

Knight Dunlap, Ph. D. Psychology 

Professor of Experimental Psychology. 

Herman L. Ebeling, Ph. D. History and Latin 

Associate Professor of Greek and Instructor in Latin, Goucher College. 

Howard E. Enders, Ph. D. Biology 

Professor of Zoology and Head of General Biology, Purdue University. 



79] 



2 Summer Courses [80 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Anabel E. Hartman, A. M. English 

Instructor in English, Eastern High School, Baltimore. 

Alvey M. Isanogle, A. B. Secondary Education 

Instructor, Thurmont High School, Maryland. 

Buford J. Johnson, Ph. D. Education and Psychology 

Bureau of Educational Experiments, New York. 

Edwin J. Kohl, S. M. Biology 

Instructor in Biology, Purdue University. 

Lydia Martin, R. N". Red Cross Home Nursing 

Chief Class Instructor, Baltimore Chapter, American Red Cross. 

John M. Mathews, Ph. D. Politics 

Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Illinois. 

J. Broadus Mitchell, Ph. D. Economics 

Instructor in Political Economy. 

Theodore H. Pond Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Robert L. Ramsay, Ph. D. English 

Associate Professor of English, University of Missouri. 

Henry A. Roben Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate Professor of Cennan. 

Gilmer iStler, A. M. Secondary Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sarah E. Simons, A. M. Secondary Education 

Head of Department of English, High Schools, The District of Columbia. 

I. Jewell Simpson, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools, Carroll County, Maryland. 

Henry Slonimsky, Ph. D. Philosophy 

Associate in Philosophy. 

Edith H. Stewart Fine Arts 

Instructor, Maryland Institute of Art. 

Winifred Sturdevant, A. B. French 

John E. Uhler. A. B. English 

Assistant in English ; Educational Director, United States Hospital No. 7. 



SI] 



Instructors 



3 



David E. Wegletn, Ph. D. Secondary Education 

Instructor in Education ; Principal of Western High School, Baltimore. 

Alfred M. Withers, A. M. Spanish 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages, Southern Methodist University, 
Dallas, Texas. 

Problems in Americanization 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 



Grade IV 
Grade V 
Grade VI 
Grade VII 
Grade VIII 



M 109 

M 121 

G 9 

G 10 

G 112 



Summer Courses [82 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The ninth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Tuesday, July 8, and continue until Friday, 
August 15, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be held every 
week-day, Monday to Friday. In addition, on Saturday, July 12, 
classes will meet as usual. Each course will consist of thirty class 
exercises or their equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will 
be additional. Examinations will be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Faculties, they are an integral part of 
the work of the University. All the resources of the institution 
essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses 
offered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate 
students who wish to advance their standing or to make up 
deficiencies; others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in 
part the entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs of 
schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing 
graduate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced 
to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular 
class exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work 
of the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs of 
individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

In cooperation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners 
a free elementary school, including the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh 
and eighth grades, will be conducted as a means of affording illustra- 
tive material for the courses in elementary education. This will be 



83] General Statement 5 

one of the city vacation schools in which pupils will be given an 
opportunity to make up deficiencies and to secure promotion at the 
beginning of the next school year. 

Four other city elementary and four secondary vacation schools, 
including possibly a vocational school, will be open during the 
session and available for observation in connection with the courses 
in elementary and secondary education. 

SELECTION OP COURSES 

Candidates for advanced degrees should arrange their programs 
in consultation with the departments in which their principal sub- 
jects lie. New students expecting to become candidates should pre- 
sent their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
College Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, 
in the selection of courses that will meet requirements for the degree. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the 
regulations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners 
to whom their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with the rule 
of the Board of University Studies: the requirement of one of the 
two years of residence for this degree may be met by attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for any of the baccalaureate 
degrees will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those 
courses designated by C. In general the same credit is given per 
hour as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two " points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an 
additional credit to exceed fifty per cent, be given, nor can a total 
credit of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer 
session. 



G Summer Courses [84 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 
cates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, Counfy, and City Superintendents and 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 8, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. Friday, July 4, being a legal 
holiday, all University buildings will be closed. The Registrar's 
office (219 Gilman Hall) will be open for registration on Saturday, 
July 5, Monday, July 7, and Tuesday, July 8, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 
After July 10, admission to each course will be restricted to regis- 
tered students. With the consent of the Director, students may make 
changes in their courses, which must be reported in person to the 
Registrar, up to and including July 10. After this date no change 
of courses will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory fees, must 
be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in registration. 

NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles street at 32d and 34th streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line, cars marked " Guilford-Union 
Station "; from the Mt. Royal Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by walking 
two blocks east to Charles street, and from Union Station (Pa., 
N. C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles street, 
marked " Roland Park " or " Guilford-Union Station " ; and also by 
the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles street. One should alight 
at 32d or at 34th street. 

EXPENSES 

The regular tuition fee is $25.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. An additional course, 
with the exceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may 



87] General Statement 9 

be attended, with the approval of the Director, upon the payment 
of an extra fee of $10.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a 
student may register in one course only, the tuition fee in such 
case being $15.) 

The tuition fee for teachers employed in public schools in Mary- 
land, as evidenced by superintendent's certificates, is $12.50, payment 
of which entitles such persons to register in two or three courses. 
Students failing to attend regularly the courses in which they have 
registered will be subject to the payment of the full fee. 

The fees for the courses in Fine Arts and Red Cross Home Nursing 
will be found in the statements of these courses. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some of the 
courses. (For details, see statements of courses.) 

The fee for the use of the tennis courts at the athletic field, 
including towel service, is $2.00. The use of the campus tennis 
courts is free. 

No reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance or for with- 
drawal. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn for the 
exact amount to the order of the Johns Hopkins University. For 
the convenience of students while in residence at the University, the 
Treasurer will receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment 
upon collection. There is no charge for this service other than the 
exchange. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board will be furnished at the Johns Hopkins Club, located in the 
Carroll Mansion on the campus. Men and women in attendance are 
eligible for summer membership, the fee being $1.00. This fee is 
payable by all who are not regular members of the Club. Member- 
ship cards are issued by the Director upon registration at the Uni- 
versity. The Club will open with luncheon, Monday, July 7, and 
close with dinner Saturday, August 16. Board is furnished at $8.00 
per week. Luncheons are served singly at 50 cents. The dairy lunch 
room in the Student Activities Building will be open daily during 
the session. 

The University has no dormitories. Furnished rooms in private 
homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent at prices 
ranging from $2.00 to $4.00 per week for a single room, and $4.00 to 
$7.00 a week for a suite of rooms. Board can be had in private 
boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices ranging from $6.00 
to $10.00 per week. A printed list of boarding and lodging houses 
will be sent upon request. 



10 Summer Courses [88 



LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening 
and closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and 
recitals which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday 
evening, in cooperation with the Summer Session of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

THE UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE AND BOOK-STORE 

The University post-office, in Gilman Hall, will be open. Students 
may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book-Store (102 Gilman Hall) supplies 
officers and students with text books, stationery, and other materials 
at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. (Office, 303 Gilman Hall). 

SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

The special courses for physicians, in connection with the Johns 
Hopkins Medical School and Hospital, will not be given this summer. 
It is expected that they will be resumed in 1920. 



89] Courses of Instruction 11 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 

1. General Biology. Professor Enders and Mr. Kohl. C* 9.30 

G lit 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
and comparison, with the aid of the microscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex. The lectures deal with the 
manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and point out our 
present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Macmillan) ; Enders, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology. 

2. Zoology. Professor Enders and Mr. Kohl. C 12.30 G 11 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior of 
these animals as well as their structure are studied, including occasional field 
excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming better 
acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures are devoted to the more 
general problems of zoological science. 

Texts: Hegner,' College Zoology (Macmillan) ; Pratt, Invertebrate Zoology 
(Ginn). 

3. The Teaching of Botany in Secondary Schools. , Professor 

Enders and Mr. Kohl. C 11.30 G 11 

The course includes laboratory study of plant material with reference to the 
needs of secondary schools, and a consideration of methods of teaching botany. 

Text: Leavitt, Outlines in Botany (American Book Co.). Other high school 
texts will be used for reference. 

Laboratory fee: $1.00, for each course. 

Note. — Students who completed any of the courses in Biology in former summers 
and desire to continue in this subject will be assigned new work, for which credit 
will be allowed. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. G 10.30 G 110 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students and those who wish 
to prepare for entrance into the Medical School. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath); Norris, Organic Chemistry (McGraw 
Hill Book Co.). 

Laboratory fee: $7.00. 

2. Qualitative, or Quantitative Analysis. Professor Gilpin. 

G and C M 29 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in either of these subjects. 
Laboratory fee: $7.00. 



* C and G preceding the hour indicate that the course may be offered for colle- 
giate or graduate credit, respectively. 

t The final initial and number indicate the building and classroom : G, Gilman 
Hall; C, Civil Engineering; M, Mechanical Engineering; S, Student Activities. 



12 Summer Courses [90 

3. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 
11.30 G 110 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It will include, 
as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the more important non-metallic 
and metallic elements and their properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer Course) 
will be used as a basis for the class-room and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fee: $5.00. 

The fee for materials in the several courses does not include the cost of small 
pieces of apparatus not returnable, and the charge for breakage to be paid at the 
close of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00. 

ECONOMICS 

1. American Economic History. Dr. Mitchell. G and C 9.30 

G 315 

Besides dealing with the economic development of the country as such, the 
effort is made to show how the history of the United States has been influenced 
by the economic motive. Special attention is given to the economic history of 
the South. 

Text: Bogait, Economic History of the United States (Longmans Green & Co.)- 

2. The Child in Industry. Dr. Mitchell. C 8.30 G 315 

The course 'deals with the industrial and legal aspects of child labor. Col- 
lateral fields are touched upon, such as juvenile courts and juvenile delinquency, 
and especially the relationship between child labor and education and health. 

3. Elements of Economics. Dr. Mitchell. C 11.30 G 315 

The principles of the science are dwelt upon with the attempt to give the 
student a general grasp of the subject. Illustrations are drawn as often as 
possible from economic happenings of the present. 

Text: Ely, Outlines of Economics CM-acmillan) . 

EDUCATION 

1. Experimental Education. Dr. Johnson. G 9.30 G 216 

This course includes a study of the aims and general methods of educational 
research and measurement. Emphasis is placed on methods of approaching edu- 
cational problems, and the application and evaluation of mental tests and measuring 
scales. Provision is made for training in giving mental tests, standard scales In 
school subjects, and in using statistical methods of deriving the results. Oppor- 
tunity is offered those prepared to undertake researches in either of these lines of 
experimental education. 

Lectures, demonstrations, experiments, and special reports. 

(See Seminary in Psychology, Psychology 2). 

2. Educational Psychology. Dr. Johnson. G and C 12.30 

G 401 

This course offers a study of the psychology of child development and the sig- 
nificance of behavior as an expression of the mental life with special consideration 
of the experimental approach to the study of the instinctive and reflex equipment, 
motor capacities, habit-formation, emotions, thought processes, and individual 
differences. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

3. Educational Administration. Professor Buchner, G and C 

10.30 G 216 

The topic of this course is the business administration of schools. Attention 
is given tp the economic bases and educational phases of the related problems of 
special concern to superintendents and principals, such as sources and distribution 



91] Courses of Instruction 13 

of public school funds, maintenance of school plant and development of building 
programs, administrative use of records and reports, measuring the efficiency of 
administration, school statistics and educational publicity. Use is made of the 
results of representative studies. 

A series of special conferences for county superintendents, on the general topic 
of business methods in school administration, will be conducted by Assistant Super- 
intendent Reavis, on the five successive Mondays, July 14, 21, 28, August 4, and 
11. The topics will be: Building plans and problems of construction; Purchase, 
distribution, and use of school supplies ; Types of records and reports ; Business 
methods in office practice ; The control of factors influencing school attendance. 

4. Modern Educational Theory. Miss Bamberger. G 11.30 

G 311 

A study of the current social theories of the school and their application is 
undertaken, including such topics as the democratic conception of education, the 
curriculum, the development of classroom conduct and the modification of school- 
room procedure. Reports on required readings are required. 

Secondary Education 

5. Secondary Education. Dr. Weglein. G and C 11.30 G 310 

This course deals with some of the principal topics in secondary education ; 
the historical development and function of the American high school ; comparisons 
with secondary schools in other countries ; the main problems connected with the 
program of studies ; extra class-room activities ; supervised study ; methods of 
instruction. 

Lectures, required readings, and reports. 

6. The Junior High School. Dr. Weglein. G and C 8.30 G 310 

The reorganization of education, historical survey of the junior high school, 
articulation of junior high schools with elementary schools and with senior high 
schools, provision for individual differences, programs of study, problems of admin- 
istration and supervision. 

7. The Teaching of Literature in Secondary Schools. Miss 

Simons. G and C 10.30 G 310 

In this course problems in the teaching of literature in both the junior and 
the senior high schools are considered and solutions suggested. The following 
problems are discussed: Selecting the masterpiece, teaching the masterpiece, 
dramatization, imitation, memorizing, the speaking voice, reading aloud, silent 
reading, outside reading, the magazine, the literature of the war, American litera- 
ture, the history of literature. Each member of the class is expected to select a 
problem and submit a solution. 

Text : Bolenius, Teaching Literature in the Grammar Grades and High School 
(Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

8. The Teaching of English Composition in Secondary Schools. 

Miss Simons. G and C 9.30 G 310 

This subject is approached from the point of view of problems stated and 
solutions proposed. The fields of the junior and the senior high schools are kept 
in view. The following topics are considered: Grammar, spelling, the sentence, 
the sentence-group or the paragraph, written work, the letter, correction of themes, 
the conference, oral work, the speaking voice. Pupils' themes are used as illus- 
trative material. As in Course 7, each member of the class is expected to select 
a problem and submit a solution. 

Text: Ward, What is English (Scott, Foresman & Co.). 

In addition to the texts indicated, courses 7 and 8 will use : Reorganization of 
English in Secondary Schools. Bulletin 1917, No. 2, Bureau of Education, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; The English Journal, ed. J. F. Hosic. 



14 Summer Courses [92 

9 The Teaching of History in Secondary Schools. Mr. Isanogle. 
G and C 12.30 G 305 

The course reviews the development of history from its advent as a school 
subject to its important place as the core of the social subjects in the reor- 
ganized curricula. Consideration is given to the selection of subject matter in 
history, the order and plan of its treatment, the lesson plan, devices and helps in 
the recitation, note taking and the handling of written work, supervised study, 
and the measurement of results of history teaching in the uipper grades and the 
high school. Attention is given to the treatment of the social studies in the 
newer courses of study for the junior high school. (Illustrative lessons in the 
Demonstration School) . 

Lectures, readings, and reports. 

10. The Teaching of Algebra and Geometry in Secondary 

Schools. Mr. Siler. G and C 9.30 G 103 

An examination of the foundations of algebra and geometry from the teacher's 
viewpoint and the determination of the aims in teaching these subjects are 
followed by discussion of methods on special topics. 

Lectures, readings and reports. 

11. The Teaching of General Science in Secondary Schools. 

Mr. Siler. G and O 10.30 G 103 

The course offers a consideration of the fundamentals of general science for 
the determination of the methods of approach in the class-room and the laboratory. 
Attention is given to the teaching problems, including the making of simple 
apparatus, in both junior and senior high schools. 

Lectures, readings and reports. 

Elementary Education 

12. Elementary Demonstration School. Miss Bamberger. C 

12.30 G 110 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching process 
in elementary schools by means of systematic observation, conference reports and 
discussions. The school will include classes of the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, 
and eighth grades, and will be in session from 8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. These 
classes are open for observation to those registered for this course. The observation 
of the teaching will begin Monday, July 14. 

The requirement of those taking the course for credit (one point) is one con- 
ference (12 30 p. m.) and four observation hours per week, with two written 
reports. 

13. Elementary School Supervision. Miss Bamberger. G and C 

10.30 G 311 

This study of the professional duties of the supervisor and the supervising 
principal includes as its chief topics principles of curriculum making, programs 
and lesson plans, criticism of instruction, and the improvement of teachers in 
service. Discussions will be based upon lesson plans in actual use and on observa- 
tions in the Elementary Demonstration School. 

14. School Management and School Law. Miss Simpson. C 

9.30 G 312 

This course is designed for teachers and principals and includes a study of : 
classroom organization and routine, the principles underlying group-instruction, 
the problems of discipline and of school attendance, the formulating of programs, 
the classification of pupils and the grading of their work, the place and scope 
of school hygiene, the psychology of school incentives, measuring the results of 
teaching, affiliated activities and outside interests. Special attention is given 
to the State school law in its relation to the teacher and to the affairs of the 
school. 



93] Courses of Instruction 15 

15. Grammar Gkaue Methods. Miss Bamberger. C 8.30 G 312 

This course presents the theory and practice of teaching the various subjects 
in the last four years of the elementary school. Topics to be considered will 
include the selection of subject matter, the method of instruction, and the manage- 
ment of children. Discussions will be based upon observation of lessons in the 
Elementary Demonstration School. Outside reading and written reports. 

1(5. Primary Grade Methods. Miss Brochhausen. C 8.30 
G 314 

By means of lectures and discussions this course considers the questions: What 
are the American ideals? What are the distinguishing characteristics of Ameri- 
cans? What should be the spirit of the American school? How can trie first four 
grades lay a foundation for the development of true Americans? The subject 
matter for each grade is outlined and effective methods for presenting the material 
are given. The course will be developed in connection with observation in the 
Elementary Demonstration School. Outside reading and reports. 

Text: Strayer, A Brief Course in the Teaching Process (Macmillan). 

17. The Teaching of English in the Elementary School. Miss 

Brochhausen. C 9.30 G 314 

The course of lectures, reports, and discussions is devoted to the teaching of 
English in the eight grades of the elementary school. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon the teaching of oral and written composition, the correlation between 
composition and literature, and the relation of spelling and grammar to composi- 
tion. Systematic observation in the Elementary Demonstration School will form a 
part of the work of the course. Outside reading will be required. 

Text: Leonard, English Composition as a Social Problem (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

18. Story Telling. Miss Brochhausen. C 11.30 G 314 

This course consists of discussions and practice in story telling. Such topics 
as the choice of the story, the preparation of the story, and the use to be made of 
the story will be discussed. Outside reading will be required. 

Text: Shedloek, The Art of Story Telling. (Appleton). 

19. Rural School Problems. Miss Simpson. C 11.30 G 312 

A study is made of the rural school as a social as well as an educational 
problem with a consideration of the data which should be available for its solution. 
Among the topics to be discussed are school buildings and equipment, the course 
of study, the purpose and use of text-books, lesson assignment and preparation, 
supervised study, home lessons, seat work, recreation and playgrounds, and rural 
hygiene. Special exercises are given in the preparation of material helpful in 
teaching, such as the daily program, outlines, lesson plans, and plans for term 
projects. 

The work proceeds with reference to the Maryland Elementary Course of Study, 
and is designed, along with Education 15, to meet the needs of persons wishing t.o 
secure the minmum preparation for teaching. 

20. Problems in Americanization. 9.30 

This course, given in cooperation with the Maryland League for National De- 
fense, offers special training for teachers of non-English speaking adults. 

Attention is given to the various problems involved in the Americanization 
movement, including racial, social, and educational features, and to methods of 
teaching English to foreigners. Classes of adults, men and women, conducted in 
the city by the International Institute of the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion and by the Young Men's Christian Association will be available for observation 
and demonstration. 

Tuition fee: $5 for students registering in this course alone. 



16 Summer Courses [94 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. The Short Story. Associate Professor Ramsay. C 8.30 

G 113 

Study and practice in the story and related forms of imaginative composition. 
Representative stories and dramas are used as material for analysis and imitation. 
Text: Williams, A Handbook on Story Writing (Dodd, Mead & Co.). 

2. Expository Writing. Miss Hartman. C 10.30 G 312 

An advanced course in English composition, devoted primarily to the principles 
and the practice of exposition. In range and in material the course is adapted, 
so far as is possible, to the needs of the class. 

Text: Jeliffe, Handbook of Exposition (Macmillan). 

3. English Composition. Miss Hartman. C 12.30 G 312 

This course consists of a survey of the principles of written English and constant 
practice in writing. Personal conferences are an important part of the course. 
Wherever possible, provision i3 made for the correlation of the work of individual 
students with their studies in other departments of instruction. 

Text: Espenshade, The Essentials of Composition and Rhetoric (Heath). 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Modern English Drama. Associate Professor Ramsay. G and 

O 9.30 G 113 

The new development of English and American drama during the past thirty 
years, with a survey of the work of some foreign masters who influenced its course. 
Text: Dickinson, Chief Contemporary Dramatists (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

2. Milton and His Time. Associate Professor Ramsay. G and 

C 11.30 G 113 

Milton's greater works, both in prose and poetry, studied as a developing 
expression of that ideal of freedom which was the masterthought of his own age 
and his greatest contribution to ours. 

Text: Milton's Poems, one-volume Cambridge ed. (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

3. English Literature, 1775-1892. Mr. Uhler. C 12.30 G 315 

This course treats the leading literary works of the poets, novelists, and 
essayists in the Romantic and Victorian periods and includes some discussion of 
the writers themselves and the development of literary and philosophic thought. 



FINE ARTS 

The courses in Fine Arts are given in co-operation with the 
Maryland Institute, of Baltimore, and constitute the fourth summer 
session of its School of Art and Design. The instruction will be given 
at Homewood, where the special facilities for out-of-door work in 
the practical courses will be constantly used. Students matriculated 
as candidates for a baccalaureate degree may offer these courses, as 
indicated, for credit. Registration in these courses is subject to the 
approval of Miss Stewart. 



97] Courses of Instruction 19 

1. Portrait Painting. Mr. Robex. C 9.30-11.20 M 202 

In this course an opportunity is afforded advanced students to draw and paint 

from the model for composition, or head and figure painting in oil, or charcoal 

drawing. The work in this course leads to magazine illustration, mural painting, 
and portraiture. 

2. Landscape and Still-Life ix Oil Painting. Mr. Roben. C 

11.30-1.20 M 202 

This course is designed for students in Fine Arts who desire drawing in color 
to lead to more advanced work, or to specialize in out-of-door painting. 

The abundant variety of views about the University grounds and nearby points 
of interest will be utilized on all pleasant days ; otherwise, the study will consist 
of st ill- life or flowers indoors. 

3. Theory of Art. Mr. Pond. C 11.30-1.20 M 119 

This course is planned especially for teachers of art in public and private 
schools, and includes illustrated talks on the theory of design, composition and 
color, and the application of the principles formulated to class-room problems in 
applied design, pictorial composition, illustration and advertising art. 

4. Applied Arts and Handicraft. Mr. Pond. O 9.30-11.20 

M 117 

A course of practical instruction in simple handicrafts adapted to the needs of 
public and private school teachers and students of Occupational Therapy. 

The course includes the design and execution of stencils, block prints, leather 
work, knife work, chip carving, permadello modeling, and such toys as can be made 
with knife and coping saw. 

5. Elementary School Color Work. Miss Stewart. C 9.30- 

11.20 6 

This course provides practice with color work throughout the grades in the 
elementary school. The objects used will be flowers and still-life of familiar 
forms, with out-of-door sketching. 

6. Drawing. Miss Stewart. C 11.30-1.20 S 

This course in drawing is designed for those who wish to teach drawing and 
desire to add to their methods of instruction. 

The regular tuition fee for the courses in Fine Arts is $10, upon payment of 
which students may elect from one to four hours of instruction. Students regularly 
registering in courses in other departments are permitted to elect one or two hours 
of work in this department upon the payment of an additional fee of $5. 

Material for any of the above courses may be obtained at the University 
Bookstore. 

The University reserves the right to withdraw courses 3 and 4 in case there 
are fewer than ten registrations in either or both. 

Changes in the schedule may be made to meet the convenience of a majority of 
the students. Academic credit will be allowed only for the satisfactory completion 
of a double-period course. 

FRENCH 

1. Old French. Miss Sturdevant. G and C 8.30 G 205 

An introduction to the study of mediaeval French literature and language, the 
stress being laid on one or the other according to the needs of individual students. 

Readings in the principal genres from the origins to the end of the 'fifteenth 
century, including selections from such works as the Pelerinage de Charlemagne, 
Chanson de Roland, Aucassin et Nicolette, Roman de Renard, Farce de Maitre 
Pathelin, and from such writers as Chretien de Troyes, Marie de France, Ville- 
hardouin, Froissart and Arnoul Greban. 

P re-requisite: A knowledge of modern French and of Latin. 



20 Summer Courses [98 

2. The French Novel. Mr. Dulac. G and C 12.30 G 205 

This course offers a special study of the development of the French novel from 
La Princesse de Cleves to Balzac and is intended for students who have consider- 
able facility in reading modern French. The minimum of preparation for entrance 
is the work outlined in Course 3. Lectures in French, collateral reading, reports 
in French. Advanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Madame de La Fayette, La Princesse de Cleves (Ginn) ; Lesage, Gil Bias 
(Heath) ; Voltaire, Zadig_ (Heath) ; Chateaubriand, Atala (Heath) ; Hugo, Les 
Miserables (Heath) ; Gautier, Jettatura (Heath) ; Sand, La Petite Fadette (Ginn). 

3. Practical French. Mr, Dulac. C 11.30 G 206 

This course is intended for students who have had the equivalent of French 4. 
The exercises of the class are conducted in French. 

Texts: Hugo, La Chute (Heath) ; Maupassant, Contes choisis, ed. Brush (Holt) ; 
Labiche, La Poudre auz yeux (Macmillan) ; Marique and Gilson, French Composi- 
tion (Ginn). 

4. Intermediate French. Miss Sturdevant. C 9.30 G 205 

This course presupposes the completion of French 5 or the equivalent, . and 
includes a review of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation and practice 
in easy composition. 

Texts: A French Reader, ed. Aldrich and Foster (Ginn) ; Labiche, La Grammaire. 
ed. Levi (Heath) ; Sardou, Les Pattes de Mouche, ed. Farnsworth (Heath) ; Dumas, 
Le Chevalier de Maison Rouge, ed. Sauveur and Jones (American Book Co.) ; 
Michelet, L'Histoire de France, ed. Wright (Heath). 

5. Elementary French. Mr. Dulac. C 10.30 G 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
consists of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, composi- 
tion, and careful reading of texts. 

Texts: Aldrich and Foster, Foundations of French (Ginn) ; Scenes of Familiar 
Life (Macmillan) ; About, La Mere de la Marquise, ed. Brush (Heath). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as partial 
fulfillment of the entrance requirements in French. 

GERMAN 

1. Goethe and Schiller: 1794-1805. Associate Professor Roul- 

ston. G 9.30 G 320 

This course is based primarily upon the correspondence between Goethe and 
Schiller. The works of the two poets during this period are studied, together 
with the gradual formulation of the classical ideas and ideals. Especial attention 
is paid to Schiller's esthetic theories and the Balladenjahr. 

2. Advanced Prose Composition and Practical Exercises. 

Associate Professor Roulston. G and C 8.30 G 108 

Practice in translating from English and in writing original themes is fur- 
nished by this course. Especial attention is devoted to the study of idioms and 
to the differences between the spoken and the written language. 

3. (a) Readings in German. Associate Professor Roulston. 

O 10.30 G 108 

The nature of this course will depend upon the previous preparation of the 
students. 

or, 
(b) Elementary German. Associate Professor Roulston. 

A thorough review of the grammar is given. This course will especially meet 
the needs of those who wish such a review while following more advanced courses. 

Note. — Texts will be announced at the opening of the session, a supply of books 
being available at the University Book-Store. 



99] Courses of Instruction 21 



HISTORY 

1. American History, 1776-1829. Professor Callahan. G 11.30 

G 305 

A seminary for advanced students on the most important problems concerned 
in the formation of the American union. Special attention is given to political 
and constitutional development, international relations, and industrial and social 
growth. 

2. American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, 1776-1919. Pro- 

fessor Callahan. G and C 10.30 G 305 

The fundamental principles of American policy ; a study of the most important 
phases of American international relations ; America's influence on international 
law and diplomacy ; the State Department and its most distinguished secretaries. 

Texts: Latane, From Isolation to Leadership (Doubleday, Page & Co.) ; Fish, 
American Diplomacy (Henry Holt & Co.). 

3. Modern English History. Professor Callahan. C 8.30 G 305 

A survey of the connected landmarks of general and institutional English history, 
presenting a study of the enlargement of English life, from the Tudors to the 
present time. 

The plan of the course emphasizes political and constitutional development, 
the evolution of colonial policy and recent foreign relations, and includes a some- 
what detailed study of relations with America. 

Texts: Tout, An Advanced History of Great Britain (Longmans Green & Co.) ; 
Slater, The Making of Modern England (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 

4. Roman History. Associate Professor Ebeling. C 9.30 G 108 

This course gives a general survey of Roman history down to the time of the 
Antonines. The aim is to understand the constitution of the Roman government 
and the causes of the greatness of Rome. The character of the people as revealed 
in their literature, art, and social life is considered. 

Texts : Pelham, Outlines of Roman History (Putnam) ; Munro, Source Book of 
Roman History (Heath). 

LATIN LITERATURE 

Latin Literature, from Earliest Beginnings to the End of the 
Second Century A. D. Associate Professor Ebeling. G and 
C 11.30 G 108 

This course is designed to give a comprehensive view of Latin literature at its 
best. It consists of lectures and the reading of selected specimens of both prose 
and verse. The reading is done in translation so that an extensive survey can 
be made. 

Texts: Mackail, Latin Literature (Scribner's) ; Laing, Masterpieces of Latin 
Literature (Houghton Mifflin Co.). 



MANUAL TRAINING 
1. Bench Work in Wood. Mr. Gaither. C 8.30-10.20 M 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper, 
elementary, and lower grades, outlining courses, planning equipment and methods 
of individual and class exercise. Advanced construction in both hard and soft 
woods is available for advanced students. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 



99 



Summer Courses [100 



2. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaitheb. C 11.30 M 

This course includes hand-work processes in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, 
basketry, bookbinding and woodwork suitable for the first six years of the ele- 
mentary schools, and in materials suitable for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will find this 
course adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

3. Mechanical Drawing. Mr. Gaither. C 10.30 M 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of teachers of mechanical 
drawing, manual and vocational training. Emphasis is placed on the functional 
value of mechanical drawing to related subjects. 

Laboratory fee: $1.50. Students will provide their own drawing instruments. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing courses 1 and 3 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore city schools, 
provided they are graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements to 
the secondary schools of Baltimore. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Finite Groups. Dr. Cohen. G 10.30 G 2 

A simple introduction to the subject. 

2. Analytic Geometry. Dr. Cohen. C 11.30 G 2 

A study of the straight line and the conic sections. 

3. Trigonometry. Dr. Cohen. 12.30 G 2 

In case of sufficient demand algebra (b) will be substituted for this course. 

MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, July 7 to August 16. Its program includes courses in 
Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, Composition, Harmony, Form and Analysis, Inter- 
pretation, Piano Pedagogy, Theory, Ear Training, and Musical Literature. 

As in former years, candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science may 
offer for credit the courses in Harmony and in Form and Analysis, when officially 
reported by the Conservatory as having been satisfactorily completed. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 

PHILOSOPHY 

1. Social Ethics. Dr. Slonimsky. G and C 10.30 G 113 

This course is an attempt to formulate a theory of progress from the standpoint 
of ethics, and to analyze and appraise the existing social institutions — the state, 
the economic order, and the family— in the light of that theory. 

2. Political Theories of Modern Times. Dr. Slonimsky. G and 

C 12.30 G 113 

An examination of the various theories which have been advanced in modern 
times concerning the nature of the state, its moral justification, the relation of 
the individual to the state, and the rights of individuals. 

POLITICS 

1. American National Government. Professor Mathews. G 
8.30 G 320 

Historical development, organizaton, powers, limitations and practical working 
of the national government of the United States. 

Text: Beard, American Government and Politics (Macmillan). 



101] Courses of Instruction 23 

2. American State Government. Professor Mathews. G and C 
10.30 G 320 

This course includes studies in the organization, powers, and methods of the 
American commonwealths in formulating and executing public policies. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

Text: Beard, American Government and Politics (Macmillan). 



PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Research in Psychology. Professor Dunlap. G G 401 

Opportunity to conduct experimental investigation is given to students ade- 
quately prepared. Laboratory periods of not less than ten hours per week are 
required. 

Note. — Students desiring to investigate special problems are requested to com- 
municate with the instructor as early as possible in order that all ncessary special 
apparatus may be on hand at the opening of the session. 

2. Seminary in Psychology. Professor Dtjnlap and Dr. Johnson. 

G and C 11.30 G 401 

The topic for this course is the development and application of psychological 
tests, including industrial, educational, and hygienic applications. 

Open to adequately prepared students. 

(See Experimental Education, Education 1). 

3. Scientific Method in Psychology. Professor Dunlap. G and 

C 9.30 G 401 

A critical study of methods and hypotheses applicable to problems of emotion, 
habit formation, judgment, and personal evaluation. 

Open to adequately prepared students. At least one course in psychology is 
pre-requisite. 

4. Introductory Psychology. Professor Dunlap. C 8.30 G 311 

Beginning the study of the mental life as a function of the reactions of the 
organism. Perception, thought, and conduct are considered in the light ©f the 
essential reactions involved, the hereditary tendencies to specific types of reaction 
(instincts), the formation of new reactions (habit formation), and emotional 
motivation. 



RED CROSS HOME NURSING 

Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick. Miss Martin. Monday and 
Thursday. 2-3.30 M 206 

This course, offered in cooperation with the Baltimore Chapter, American Red 
Cross, provides individual training in elementary hygiene and home care of the 
sick, based upon the more recent developments in hygiene, sanitation, and methods 
of home-nursing. The course includes fifteen lessons, the class meeting on such 
additional days as may be arranged. 

Tuition fee: $2.50. All necessary materials will be furnished. The course 
may be withdrawn in case there are fewer than ten registrations. 

Text: Delano, American Red Cross Textbook on Home Hygiene and Care of the 
Sick (Blakiston's Son and Co.). 



24 Summer Courses [102 



SPANISH 

1. Spanish Literature. Associate Professor Withers. G and C 

9.30 a 100 

A critical study of representative specimens of Spanish drama and fiction of the 
nineteenth century. Any modification of the course necessary to meet the needs 
of students will be made. Advanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Valera, Pepita Jimenez (American Book Co.) ; Ibanez, La Barraea 
(Holt) ; Gil y Zarate, Guzman el Bueno (Ginn) ; Echegaray, El Gran Galeoto 
(A. Kopf, New York). 

2. Intermediate Spanish. Associate Professor Withers. C 8.30 

G 100 

Reading of modern prose in class and as parallel ; prose composition and con- 
versational practice based on Espinosa's Advanced Spanish Composition and Con- 
versation (Sanborn and Go.). 

Additional texts : GaldOs, Marianela (Heath) ; V aides, Capitan Ribot (Heath) ; 
Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno (Heath). 

3. Elementary Spanish. Associate Professor Withers. C 10.30 

G 100 

Grammar, reading, composition, with special stress on pronunciation and oral 
exercises. 

Texts: Olmsted and Gordon, Abridged Spanish Grammar (Holt); Roessler and 
Remy, First Spanish Reader (American Book Co.) ; other reading texts to be 
selected according to the needs of the class. 



SCHEDULE 



8. SO— 9.20 

Economics 2 

Education 6 

Education 15 

Education 16 

English Composition 1 

French 1 

German 2 

History 3 

Manual Training 1 (8. 30—10.20) 

Politics 1 

Psychology 4 

Spanish 2 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Economics 1 
Education 1 
Education 8 
Education 10 
Education 14 
Education 17 
Education 20 
English Literature 1 
Fine Arts 1 (9.30—11.20) 
Fine Arts 4 (9.30—11.20) 
Fine Arts 5 (9.30—11.20) 
French 4 
German 1 
History 4 

Manual Training 1 (continued) 
Psychology 3 
Spanish 1 

10.30—11.20 

Chemistry 1 

Education 3 

Education 7 

Education 11 

Education 13 
English Composition 2 

Fine Arts 1 (continued) 

Fine Arts 4 (continued 

Fine Arts 5 (continued) 
French 5 
German 3 
History 2 



10.30—11.20 (continued) 
Mathematics 1 
Manual Training 3 
Philosophy 1 
Politics 2 
Spanish 3 

11.30—12.20 
Biology 3 
Chemistry 3 
Economics 3 
Education 4 
Education- 5 
Education 18 
Education 19 
English Literature 2 
Fine Arts 2 (11.30—1.20) 
Fine Arts 3 (11.30—1.20) 
Fine Arts 6 (11.30—1.20) 
French 3 
History 1 
Latin Literature 
Manual Training 2 
Mathematics 2 
Psychology 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Education 2 
Education 9 

Education 12 (Conference) 
English Composition 3 
English Literature 3 
Fine Arts 2 (continued) 
Fine Arts 3 (continued) 
Fine Arts 6 (continued) 
French 2 
Mathematics 3 
Philosophy 2 

1.30—4.20 

Chemical Laboratory 

2.00—3.30 

Red Cross Home Nursing (M., Th.) 

Z.30— 4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Psychological Laboratory ♦ 



8.30 — 12.30: Elementary Demonstration School. [Classes will be open for ob- 
servation Monday, July 14.] 
The hours of Chemistry 2, Psychology 1, and Red Cross 2 will be arranged. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 350 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A. B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Degrees B. of Eng. and S. B. in Chem. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 
Degrees D. P. H., S. D., and S. B. in Hyg. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B. and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 
(Not offered in 1919) 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND IN 

ENGINEERING 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



} 



Series, 1920 Whole Number 322 

No. 2 



THE 

JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 6— AUGUST 13 
1920 



Baltimore, Maryland 
Published by the University 
Issued Monthly, except February, June, August, September 
March, 1920 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second- class' matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 11G3, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 3, 1918 



Uitek swt klral Mm tawi 



CALENDAR, 1920 



June 15, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



July 3 — Saturday 7 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., Kegistration, 

July 5 — Monday ) Oilman Hall, Homewood. 

July 6, Tuesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 



July 10, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 
August 13, Friday — Close of Summer Courses. 



September 28, Tuesday — Forty-fifth regular session begins. 

October 4, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, twelfth yeaf 
begins. 

October 11, Monday — Evening Courses in Business and Social 
Economics and in Engineering, fifth year 
begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, July 6, accord- 
ing to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that students 
should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening exercise 
of each course which they intend to pursue. 

IgT Registration should be made prior to July G. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 

1920 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 
Director of the Summer Courses 

Thomas R. Ball, 
Registrar 

W. Graham Boyce, 
Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

Florence E. Bamberger, A. M. Elementary Education 

Associate in Education. 

English Bagby, Ph. D. Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Virginia Military Institute. 

Henry M. Belden, Ph. D. English 

Professor of English, University of Missouri. 

Albert G. Belding, S. B., C. P. A. Commercial Education 

Acting Principal, Far Rockaway High School, and Supervisor of Evening 
Commercial Courses, New York City. 

Beverley W. Bond, Jr., Ph. D. History 

Associate Professor of History, Purdue University. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Education 

Director ; Professor of Education, 

Teresa Cohen, Ph. D. Mathematics 



Frances R. Dearborn, A. B. Elementary Education 

•tment 
Detn 

97] 



Department of Education and Practice Teaching, The Detroit City Normal, 
Detroit, Mich. 



2 Summer Courses [98 

Wayland F. Dunaway, A. M. Secondary Education 

Assistant Professor of History, Pennsylvania State College. 

Herman L. Ebeling, Ph. D. Classical Literature and History 

Associate Professor of Greek and Instructor in Latin, Goucher College. 

Howard E. Enders, Ph. D. Biology 

Professor of Zoology and Head of General Biology, Purdue University. 

John C. French, Ph. D. English and Journalism 

Associate Professor of English. 

George M. Gaither Manual Training 

Supervisor of Manual Training, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Buford J. Johnson, Ph. D. Education 

Bureau of Educational Experiments, New York. 

Percy L. Kaye, Ph. D. Economics 

Head of Department of History, Civics and Economics, Baltimore City College. 

Edwin J. Kohl, S. M. Biology 

Instructor in Biology, Purdue University. 

H. Carrington Lancaster, Ph. D. French 

Professor of French Literature. 

Ella Lonn, Ph. D. Politics 

Assistant Professor of History, Goucher College. 

Elmer V. MoCollum, Ph. D. School Hygiene 

Professor of Bio-Chemistry. 

George Melcher, A.M. Education 

Director of Bureau of Research and Efficiency, Kansas City Public Schools. 

Kay M. Merrill, A. M. Spanish 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

G. Ellis Porter, A. B. Journalism 

Editorial Staff of The Sun, Baltimore, Md. 

Jonathan T. Rorer, Ph. D. Secondary Education 

Head of Department of Mathematics, The William Penn High School, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate Professor of German. 

Sarah E. Simons, A. M. Secondary Education 

Head of Department of English, High Schools, The District of Columbia. 

I. Jewell Simpson, A. B. Elementary Education 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools, Carroll County, Md. 



99] 



Instructors 



Mabel E. Simpson, Elementary Education 

Director of Elementary Grades and Kindergartens, Rochester Public Schools. 



Alvin Thalheimer, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 



Philosophy 



David E. Weglein, Ph. D. Secondary Education 

Instructor in Education ; Principal of Western High School, Baltimore. 
Problems in Americanization 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 



Grade IV 
Grade V 
Grade VI 
Grade VII 
Grade VIII 



M 109 

M 121 

G 8 

G 9 

G 112 



The location of the Junior High School classes will be announced at the opening 
of the session. 



Summer Courses [100 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The tenth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Tuesday, July 6, and continue until Friday, 
August 13, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be held every 
week-day, Monday to Friday. In addition, on Saturday, July 10, 
classes will meet as usual. Each course will consist of thirty class 
exercises or their equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will 
be additional. Examinations will be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Faculties, they are an integral part of 
the work of the University. All the resources of the institution 
essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses 
offered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate 
students who wish to advance their standing or to make up 
deficiencies; others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve 
in part the entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects 
not given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs of 
schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing 
graduate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced 
to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular 
class exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work 
of the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs 
of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

In co-operation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners 
a free elementary school, including the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh 
and eighth grades, will be conducted as a means of affording illustra- 
tive material for the courses in elementary education. This will be 
one of the city vacation schools in which pupils will be given an 



101] General Statement 5 

opportunity to make up deficiencies and to secure promotion at the 
beginning of the next school year. Classes in several subjects for 
Junior High School pupils will be included. 

Four other city elementary and four secondary vacation schools, 
including possibly a vocational school, will be open during the 
session and available for observation in connection with the courses 
in elementary and secondary education. 

SELECTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for advanced degrees should arrange their programs 
in consultation with the departments in which their principal sub- 
jects lie. New students expecting to become candidates should pre- 
sent their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
College Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, in 
the selection of courses that will meet requirements for the degree. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the 
regulations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners 
to whom their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with the rule 
of the Board of University Studies: the requirement of one of the 
two years of residence for this degree may be met by attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for any of the baccalaureate 
degrees will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those 
courses designated by C. In general the same credit is given per 
hour as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two " points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an addi- 
tional credit to exceed fifty per cent, be given, nor can a total credit 
of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer 
session. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 



6 Summer Courses [102 

eates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, County, and City Superintendents and 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 6, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. The Registrar's office (219 
Gilman Hall) will be open for registration on Saturday, July 3, 
Monday, July 5, and Tuesday, July 6, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. After 
July 8, admission to each course will be restricted to registered 
students. With the consent of the Director, students may make 
changes in their courses, which must be reported in person to the 
Registrar, up to and including July 8. After this date no change 
of courses will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory fees, must 
be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in registration. 

NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles street at 32d and 34th streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line cars marked " Guilford-Union 
Station"; from the Mount Royal Station (B. &. O. Railroad) by 
walking two block east to Charles street, and from Union Station 
(Pa., X. C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles 
street, marked " Roland Park " or " Guilford-Union Station " ; and 
also by the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles street. One 
should alight at 32d or at 34th street. 

EXPENSES 

The regular tuition fee is $30.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. An additional course, 
with the exceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may 



105] General Statement 9 

be attended, with the approval of the Director, upon the payment 
of an extra fee of $12.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a 
student may register in one course only, the tuition fee in such 
case being $20.) 

The tuition fee for officers and teachers employed in public schools 
in Maryland, as evidenced by superintendent's certificates, is $15.00, 
payment of which entitles such persons to register in two or three 
courses. Students failing to attend regularly the courses in which 
they have registered will be subject to the payment of the full fee. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some of the 
courses. (For details, see statements of courses.) 

The fee for the use of the tennis courts at the athletic field, 
including towel service, is $2.00. The use of the campus tennis 
courts is free. 

Xo reduction of fees will be allowed for late entrance or for with- 
drawal. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn to the 
order of the Johns Hopkins University. For the convenience of 
students while in residence at the University, the Treasurer will 
receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment upon collection. 
There is no charge for this service. 

BOAKD AND LODGING 

Board will be furnished at the Johns Hopkins Club, located in the 
Carroll Mansion on the campus. Men and women in attendance are 
eligible for summer membership, the fee being $2.00. This fee is 
payable by all who are not regular members of the Club. Member- 
ship cards are issued by the Director upon registration at the Uni- 
versity. The Club will open with luncheon, Monday, July 5, and 
close with dinner Saturday, August 14. Board is furnished at $10.00 
per week. Luncheons are served singly at 55 cents. The dairy lunch 
room in the Student Activities Building will be open daily during 
the session. 

The University has no dormitories. Furnished rooms in private 
homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent at prices 
ranging from $3.00 to $6.00 per week for a single room. Board can 
be had in private boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices 
ranging from $7.00 to $13.00 per week. A printed list of boarding 
and lodging houses will be sent upon request. 

FRENCH TABLE AT THE JOHNS HOPKINS CLUB 

A table for French conversation will be reserved at the Johns 
Hopkins Club during the luncheon hour. The table will be in charge 
of Mrs. R. M. Merrill, a native Parisian, and will offer to members 



10 Summer Courses [106 

of the summer courses excellent facilities for practice in this lan- 
guage. The special fee for the reservation of a seat at this table 
during the thirty days of the session will be $8.00 a person, if eight 
persons apply, or $7.00, if there are ten persons. This fee is in 
addition to the summer membership fee and to cost of meals. 
Application should be made before July 6. 

LECTUKES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening 
and closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and 
recitals which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday 
evening, in co-operation with the Summer Session of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions wiU be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

THE UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE AND BOOK-STORE 

The University post-office, in Gilman Hall, will be open. Students 
may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book-Store (102 Gilman Hall) supplies 
officers and students with text books, stationery, and other materials 
at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. The Director, Dr. French, will be found in his office (303 
Gilman Hall) during the session. 

SUMMER WORK FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning Tuesday, June 1, and ending Thursday, July 15, a 
course in medical diagnosis, including laboratory exercises in clinical 
pathology and demonstrations in pathological anatomy, occupying 
the greater part of each day, will be offered. The course will be 
limited to twenty students; fee $100. Applications should be made 
to the Dean of the Medical School of the University. 



107] Courses of Instruction 11 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



BIOLOGY 

1. General Biology. Professor Endeks and Mr. Kohl. C* 9.30 

G lit 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
and comparison, with the aid of the miscroscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex. The lectures deal with the 
manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and point out our 
present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Macmillan); Enders, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology. 

2. Zoology. Professor Enders and Mr. Kohl. C 12.30 G 11 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior of 
these animals as well as their structure are studied, including occasional field 
excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming better 
acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures are devoted to the more 
general problems of zoological science. 

Texts: Hegner, College Zoology (Macmillan); Pratt, Invertebrate Zoology 
(Ginn). 

3. The Teaching of Botany in Secondary Schools. Mr. Kohl. 

C 11.30 G 11 

The course includes laboratory study of plant material with reference to the 
needs of secondary schools, and a consideration of methods of teaching botany. 

Text: Leavitt, Outlines in Botany (American Book Co.). Other high school 
texts will be used for reference. 

Laboratory fee: $1.50, for each course. 

Note. — Students who completed any of the courses in Biology in former summers 
and desire to continue in this subject will be assigned new work for which credit 
will be allowed. 

CHEMISTKY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. G 10.30 C 114 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students and those who wish 
to prepare for entrance into the Medical School. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Norris, Organic Chemistry (McGraw 
Hill Book Co.). 

Laboratory fee: $10.00. 

2. Qualitative, or Quantitative Analysis. Professor Gilpin. 

G and C C 20. 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in either of these subjects. 
Laboratory fee: $7.00. 



* C and G preceding the hour indicate that the course may be offered for colle- 
giate or graduate credit, respectively. 

t The final initial and number indicate the building and classroom : G, Gilman 
Hall; C, Civil Engineering; M, Mechanical Engineering; B. P. 1., Baltimore 
Polytechnic Institute. 



12 Summer Courses i [108 

3. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin. C 
11.30 M 110 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It will include, 
as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the more important non-metallic 
and metallic elements and their properties. Remsen's Chemistry (Briefer Course) 
will be used as a basis for the class-room and laboratory work. 

Laboratory fee: $7.00. 

The fee for materials in the several courses does not include the cost of small 
pieces of apparatus not returnable, and the charge for breakage to be paid at the 
close of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00. 



CLASSICAL LITERATURE 

Greek and Latin Epic, Lyric, and Dramatic Poetry. Associate 
Professor Ebeling. G and C 11.30 G 108 

A special study is made of the development of these branches of Greek poetry 
and their influence on Roman literature. Selected specimens in' English transla- 
tions will be read. 

Texts: Fowler, A History of Ancient Greek Literature (Appleton) ; Mlackail, 
Latin Literature (Scribner's). 

ECONOMICS 

1. American Economic History. Dr. Kaye. G and C 11.30 G 315 

IBesides dealing with the economic development of the country as such, the effort 
is made to show how the history of the United States has been influenced by the 
economic motive. Special attention is given to the economic history of the South. 

Text: Bogart, Economic History of the United States (Longmans Green & Co.). 

2. Elements of Economics. Dr. Kaye. C 9.30 G 315 

The principles of the science are dwelt upon with the attempt to give the student 
a general grasp of the subject. Illustrations are drawn as often as possible from 
economic happenings of the present. 

Text: Carver, Principles of Political Economy (Ginn). 



EDUCATION 

1. Experimental Education: Tests in School Subjects. Dr. 

Johnson. G 8.30 G 320 

This course deals with educational measurements and includes a study of the 
standardized scales and group survey method of testing pupil achievements in 
school subjects ; the interpretation of statistical data for the determination of 
the diagnostic value of the tests ; and the application of these methods in in- 
structional control. Problems for investigation may be undertaken either in 
elementary or in secondary education. 

The course comprises three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 

2. Experimental Education: Intelligence of School Chil- 

dren. Dr. Johnson. G 11.30 G 314 

This course in experimental education emphasizes the principles and technique 
of rating the intelligence of school children, the development and forms of 
tests, both individual and group, statistical evaluation of data and graphical modes 
of presentation, with special reference to the application of the results of such 
measurements in instructional control. 

The course comprises three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 



109] Courses of Instruction 13 

3. Educational Psychology: Adolescence. Dr. Johnson. G 

and C 10.30 G 320 

Discussion of the characteristics of the mental life of the adolescent, the in- 
stinctive basis of behavior, and the variations in emotional responses. The sig- 
nificance of these topics for the organization of educational theories and practice 
will be emphasized. 

Lectures, assigned readings and reports. 

4. School Hygiene. Professor McColltjm. G and C 8.30 G 216 

This course presents the history of the growth of the movement toward im- 
provement of the physical condition of school children, the methods of detecting 
sub-normal physical development, the methods of teaching children simple prin- 
ciples of nutrition and personal hygiene, and demonstrates the correlation of this 
hygenic training with other school activities as a part of a fundamental educa- 
tional undertaking. 

This course is given in cooperation with the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health, under the auspices of the DeLamar Foundation for the Extension of 
Medical Knowledge. DeLamar Scholarships have been made available for students 
registering in this course alone. Application should be made to the Director. 

Tuition fee: $5 for students registering in this course alone. 

Secondary Education 

5. Secondary Education. Dr. Weglein. G and C 11.30 G 310 

This course deals with some of the principal topics in secondary education ; 
the historical development and function of the American high school ; comparisons 
with secondary schools in other countries ; the main problems connected with the 
program of studies ; extra class-room activities ; supervised study ; methods of 
instruction. 

Lectures, required readings, and reports. 

6. The Junior High School. Dr. Weglein. G and C 9.30 G 310 

The reorganization of education, historical survey of the junior high school, 
articulation of junior high schools with elementary schools and with senior high 
schools, provision for individual differences, programs of study, problems of admin- 
istration and siipervision. 

7. The Teaching of Literature in Secondary Schools. Miss 

Simons. G and C 10.30 G 310 

In this course problems in the teaching of literature in both the junior and 
the senior high schools are considered and solutions suggested. The following 
problems are discussed : Selecting the masterpiece, teaching the masterpiece, 
dramatization, imitation, memorizing, the speaking voice, reading aloud, silent 
reading, outside reading, the magazine, the literature of the war, American litera- 
ture, the history of literature. Attention is also given to the problems of the 
supervision of teaching English Literature. Each member of the class is ex- 
pected to select a problem and submit a solution. 

S. The Teaching of English Composition in Secondary Schools. 
Miss Simons. G and C 8.30 G 310 

This subject is approached from the point of view of problems stated and 
solutions proposed. The fields of the junior and the senior high schools are kept 
in view. The following topics are considered: Grammar, spelling, the sentence, 
the sentence-group or the paragraph, written work, the letter, correction of themes, 
the conference, oral work, the speaking voice. Pupils' themes are used as illus- 
trative material. Attention is also given to the problems of the supervision of 
teaching English composition. As in course 7, each member of the class is ex- 
pected to select a problem and submit a solution. 

In addition to the texts to be announced, courses 7 and 8 will use : Reorgani- 
zation of English in Secondary Schools. Bulletin 1917, No. 2, Bureau of Edu- 
cation, Washington, D. C. ; The English Journal, ed. J. F. Hosic. 



11 Summer Courses [110 

9. The Teaching of Algebra in Secondary Schools. Dr. Rorer. 

G and C 8.30 G 2 

Educational values of algebra, its place in the curriculum ; courses adapted to 
the junior and to the senior high schools ; discussion of the merits of recent and 
of well established text books ; classroom methods and practice, tests, examinations, 
important reports and references to journals. 

Each student should be provided with some high school algebra and with one 
of the following reference books: Smith, The Teaching of Elementary Mathe- 
matics (Macmillan) ; Young, The Teaching of Mathematics (Longmans, Green & 
Co.) ; Schultze, The Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School (Mac- 
millan). 

10. 'The Teaching op Geometry in Secondary Schools. Dr. 

Rorer. G and C 9.30 G 2 

A course similar to Education 9, but dealing with geometr3 r , — both for junior 
and senior high schools. 

Each student should be provided with some high school geometry and either : 
Smith, The Teaching of Geometry (Ginn), or with one of the reference books 
mentioned in Education 9. 

11. The Teaching of History in Secondary Schools. Assistant 

Professor Dunaway. G and C 12.30 G 305 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers of history in the upper 
grades and in the high school, including the junior high school. Its aim is 
to furnish instruction in the best methods and materials to be used, with a 
view to their practical application in the class-room. The principles and meth- 
ods are developed by the study of approved literature on the subject, lesson 
plans, maps, devices and helps in recitations, and other aids. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions. 

12. The Teaching of Civics in Secondary Schools. Assistant 

Professor Dunaway. G and C 9.30 G 305 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in the teaching of civics 
to teachers in the upper grades and in the high school, including the junior 
high school. It examines from the teacher's viewpoint the place of civics in 
the curriculum, its relation to the school sciences, and its function in the 
training for citizenship, as well as directing attention to the machinery of 
government. Special consideration will be given to the organization of ma- 
terial, teaching helps, and class-room presentation. 

Lectures, readings, report , and discussions. 

13. The Teaching of Bookkeeping and Business Practice in 

Secondary Schools. Mr. Belding. G and C 9.30 G 312 

This course is designed to aid teachers of these subjects in better organizing 
their knowledge of subject matter for purposes of teaching. General and specific 
aims are defined and the means by which these aims may be realized are considered. 
The various methods of approach are contrasted and teachers will be offered every 
opportunity to present their own problems for solution. 

Text: Belding, Accounts and Accounting Practice (American Book Co.). 

14. The Teaching of Office Training in Secondary Schools. 

Mr. Belding. G and C 10.30 G 312 

This course is intended primarily for teachers of stenography and typewriting 
who wish to broaden the scope of their work in the class room. The technique of 
business communications, handling correspondence, orders and purchases, shipping 
and insurance, banking and financial operations, are among the topics considered. 

Texts: McClelland. Office Training and Standards (A. W. Shaw Co.); Gal- 
loway, Office Management (Ronald Press Co.). 



Ill] Courses of Instruction 15 

15. Supervised Study. Miss M. U. Simpson. G and C 8.30 G 315 

This course is intended primarily for teachers of the junior high and upper 
grades of the elementary school, but will be of value to teachers of other grades 
as well as to principals. Various types of supervised study now in operation are 
explained and studied, including the divided period plan. Special attention is 
given to: the meaning of study, the evaluation of the course of study with its or- 
ganization into units of instruction and units of recitation, lesson types with 
particular emphasis upon the socialized lesson, lesson plans and provision for 
individual differences existing among pupils. 

Readings, reports and discussions. 

Texts : Hall-Quest, Supervised Study (Macmillan) ; McMurray, How to Study 
(Houghton Mifflin). 

Note : For additional courses presenting material on teaching secondary sub- 
jects, see Biology 3, English Composition 1, English Literature 3, Manual 
Training, and Spanish 2. 

Elementary Education 

16. Elementary Demonstration School. Miss Bamberger and 

Professor Buchner. C 12.30 G 112 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching 
process in elementary schools by means of systematic observation, conference re- 
ports and discussions. The school will include classes of the fourth, fifth, 6ixth, 
seventh, and eighth grades, and will be in session from 8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. 
These classes are open for observation to those registered for this course. The 
observation of the teaching will begin Monday, July 12. 

The requirement of those taking the course for credit (one point) is one con- 
ference (12.30 p. m.) and four observation hours per week, with two written 
reports. 

17. The Supervision of Instruction in a County School Sys- 

tem. Mr. Melcher and Miss Bamberger. G and C 9.30- 
12.20 G 216 

This course for Superintendents and Supervisors of County Schools is conducted 
in cooperation with the State Department of Education of Maryland. It com- 
prises three sections, A, B, and C, as stated below. It is scheduled to meet in 
two sessions: the first session, comprising sections A and B, will be held during 
the first three weeks of the Summer Courses, Juy 6-July 23 ; the second session 
provides for Section C, meeting three weeks in January, 1921. Credit will be 
allowed for the satisfactory completion of the entire course, as also for any one 
of the sections. 

The summer session includes: 

A. The Use of Tests for Diagnostic Purposes. Mr. Melcher. 

9.30-11.20 

This section of the course presents the best tests in reading, arithmetic, lan- 
guage, grammar and geography, with special reference to the use of tests for the 
improvement of class room instruction. Special attention is also given to the 
problems of how to evaluate tests and how to interpret the results, including both 
the amount of detailed training that should be given to the individual teacher in 
scoring, tabulating, and evaluation of the results of educational tests, and the 
supervisory coordination of such efforts of all the teachers of a county 60 as to 
improve the quality of instruction. This work is undertaken with reference to 
the most effective devices and methods for teaching the elementary school sub- 
jects. Attention is given to the employment of those tests which are useful for 
diagnosing the differences of individual pupils. 

B. Methods of Instruction. Miss Bamberger. 11.30-12.20 

This course presents the theory and practice of teaching the various subjects in 
the elementary schools. Topics to be considered will include the selection and 
organization of subject matter, the method of instruction, and the management of 
children. 

The winter session includes: 



16 Summer Courses [112 

C. The Foundation of Method. 

Note. — (Announcement of details concerning the winter session,' which will be 
devoted to the philsophical foundation of methods of instruction, will be made 
later. 

IS. School Management and School Law. Miss I. J. Simpson. 
C 8.30 G 311 

This course is designed for teachers and principals, and includes a study of: 
classroom organization and routine, the teacher's relation to the curriculum, the 
problems of discipline and of school attendance, the classification of pupils and 
provision for individual differences, the formulating of programs, the principles 
underlying group instruction, provisions for the physical welfare of pupils, the 
psychology of school incentives, measuring the results of teaching, professional 
relationships. Special attention is given to the State school law in its relation 
to the teacher and to the affairs of the school. 

19. Applied Principles of Teaching. Miss Dearborn. C 12.30 

G 314 

In this course the theories underlying teaching problems are developed through 
the making of a definite unit of work. This unit may be in the form of an 
outline of a problem-project, or it may be a collection of material for a series 
of specific grade problems. The theory of aims, motives, questioning, choice of 
subject-matter, sources, evaluation of materials, abilities, skills and measuring 
results, will parallel the practical application of each topic studied. Outside 
readings and reports will be required. 

Text: Freeland, Modern Elementary School Practice (Macmillan). 

20. Grammar Grade Methods. Miss M. E. Simpson. C 12.30 

G 315 

This course aims to present the theory and practice of teaching in relation 
to fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades. It includes a study of such factors as 
the organization of courses of study ; programs ; time schedules ; departmental 
teaching ; classroom management ; examinations ; tests ; methods of instruction 
with special emphasis upon the project-problem method. 

Text: Strayer, A Brief Course in the Teaching Process (MacMillan) ; McMur- 
ray, Teaching by Projects (Miacmillan). 

21. Primary Methods. Miss Dearborn. C 8.30 G 314 

This course is planned with four purposes in view : to present the results of 
late experiments with child-material and subject-matter, to discuss in detail the 
present trend of methods, to focalize the methods which will produce the best 
results with the least expenditure of pupil-teacher time and effort, and to pro- 
vide a clearing-house solution for the method problems of daily teaching. Out- 
side reading will be required. 

Texts: Earhart, Types of Teaching (Houghton MifHin) ; Part II of the Eigh- 
teenth Year Book, the National Society for the Study of Education (Public School 
Publishing Co.). 

22. The Teaching of History and Geography in the Elemen- 

tary School. Miss M. E. Simpson. C 10.30 G 315 

The first part of this course deals with the materials and methods of teaching 
Geography in the elementary school. Emphasis is placed upon the evaluation of 
subject matter and its organization into type studies, attention being given to the 
collection and use of pictures, raw materials, maps and charts that aid in making 
the work concrete. 

The latter part of the course is devoted to the study of History. This involves 
a consideration of what content should be included in the course of study and the 
organization of subject matter into Units of Instruction and Units of Recitation. 
A study is made of some of the most recent history texts, the value of collateral 
reading, and the place of current events as an important factor in the teaching of 
history. 

Texts: Dodge & Kirchwey, Teaching of Geography (Rand, McNally <fc Co.) ; 
Johnson, Teaching of History (Macmillan). 



115] Courses of Instruction 19 

23. English and Literature in the Elementary School. Miss 

Dearborn. C 9.30 G 314 

The study and discussion in this course aim to bring to the foreground prac- 
tical ideas concerning the teaching of English and literature in order to best fit 
the children of the elementary grades for the social, economic, industrial, and 
cultural needs of life. Examination of present methods and subject-matter will 
be made to determine the changes needed to bring better equipped pupils to the 
High Schools, and to eliminate waste of effort and time in securing the desired 
results. Literature sources and adaptation of stories to the psychological needs 
of the children will be stressed. Outside reading will be required. 

Text: Sheridan, Speaking and Writing English (Sanborn). 

24. Rural School Problems. Miss I. J. Simpson. C 9.30 G 311 

A study is made of the rural school as a social as well as an educational 
problem with a consideration of the data which should be available for its solution. 
Among the topics to be discussed are school buildings and equipment, the course 
oi study, the purpose and use of text-books, lesson assignments and preparation, 
supervised study, home lessons, seat work, recreation and playgrounds, and rural 
hygiene. Special exercises are given in the preparation of material helpful in 
teaching, such as the daily program, outlines, lesson plans, and plans for term 
projects. 

The work proceeds with reference to the Maryland Elementary Course of Study, 
ancl is designed, along with Education 18, to meet the needs of persons wishing to 
secure the minimum preparation for teaching. 

25. Problems in Americanization. C 8.30-10.20 G 313 

This course, given in cooperation with the Maryland State Americanization Com- 
mittee, offers special training for teachers of non-English speaking adults. 

Attention is given to the various problems involved in the Americanization move- 
ment, including racial, social, and educational features, and especially to methods 
of teaching English to foreigners. Classes of adults, men and women, conducted in 
the city by the International Institute of the Young Women's Christian Association 
and by the Young Men's Christian Association will be available for observation and 
demonstration. 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Good Use. Professor Belden. C 11.30 G 113 

A study of the principles of authority in language, with special attention to those 
points of disputed or divided usage which are likely to come up in the teaching of 
English in secondary schools. 

Text: Krapp, Modern English (Scribner's). 

2. The Forms of Contemporary Prose Writing. Associate Pro- 
fessor French. C 10.30 G 311 

(This course is identical with Journalism 1.) 

EXGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Eighteenth Century Literature. Professor Belden. G and C 

8.30 G 113. 

The chief writers from Dry den to Johnson. 

Text: Bronson, English Poems: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century 
(University of Chicago Press). 

2. The Popular Ballad. Professor Belden. G and C 9.30 G113 

A study of popular poetry, especially the narrative ballad, with consideration of 
the chief theories concerning the origins of popular poetry and its relation to the 
poetry of culture. 

Text: Sargent and Kittredge, English and Scottish Popular Ballads (Houghton 
Mifflin). 



20 Summer Courses [116 

3. American Verse. Associate Professor French. C 12.30 G 311 

A survey of the various types of verse represented in American literature, 
including the works of contemporary authors. Emphasis will be laid on the poems 
commonly studied in secondary schools. 

Text: Pattee, Century Readings in American Literature (The Century Co.). 

Note. — The full course on American Literature given in the regular session, of 
which this is approximately the first half, may be completed in the second half- 
year of the College Courses for Teachers. 

FINE ARTS 

Instruction in Fine Arts, given hitherto at Homewood in co-opera- 
tion with the Maryland Institute of Baltimore, will be conducted at 
the Institute, .Lanvale Street and Mount Royal Avenue, June 21 to 
July 31. (For separate circular, address Director of the Institute.) 

Students matriculated as candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
may offer these courses for credit. Such credit will be allowed only 
for the satisfactory completion of double-period courses. 

FRENCH 

1. Moliere. Professor Lancaster. G and C 8.30 G 205 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility in reading 
French. The minimum of preparation for entrance is the work outlined in 
Course 2. Lectures in French, collateral reading, reports in French. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Moliere, VEcole des femmes (Oxford) ; le Tartujfe (Oxford) ; le }fisan- 
thrope (Heath) ; I'Avare (Heath) ; le Bourgeois Gentilhomme (Heath) ; les Femmes 
savantes (Macmillan). 

2. Practical French. Professor Lancaster. C 11.30 G 205 

This course is intended for students who have adequate preparation in French 
Elements. The exercises of the class are conducted in French. 

Texts: Bazin, Contes choisis (Heath) ; Daudet, Tartarin sur les Alpes (Holt) ; 
Comfort, French Composition (Heath) ; Cerf, French Pronunciation (Holt). 

Note. — Attention is called to the provision for the French Table during the 
session. See page 9. 

3. Elementary French. Professor Lancaster. C 10.30 G 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
consists of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, composi- 
tion, and careful reading of texts. 

Texts: Olmsted, Elementary French Grammar (Holt) ; Merimee, Colomba, ed. 
Lamb (Scott, Foresman). 

Note. — Satisfactory completion of this course will be counted as partial fulfill- 
ment of the entrance requirements in French. 

In case of sufficient demand, an advanced section of Course 3 will be formed as 
a course for Intermediate French. 

GERMAN 

1. Advanced German. Associate Professor Rotjlston. G and C 
10.30 G 100 
A course in German literature, prose composition and practical exercises, or some 
phase of readings, is offered, the specific work to be undertaken to be selected in 
accordance w-ith the interests and needs of students. 



117] Courses of Instruction 21 

2. Intermediate German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 9.30 

G 100 

Texts: Leskien. Schuld, ed. Morgan (Oxford) ; Rosegger, Waldheimat, ed. Fossler 
(Ginn) ; Keller, Kleider machen Leute, ed. Lambert (Heath). 

3. Elementary German. Associate Professor Rotjlston. C 8.30 

G 100 

A thorough review of the grammar is given. This course especially meets the 
needs of those who wish such a review while following more advanced courses. 

HISTORY 

1. American Colonial History to 1690. Associate Professor Bond. 

G 11.30 G 305 

A seminary course for advanced students which includes a survey of the European 
background of American colonization, followed by a detailed study of English 
colonization, and especially of the different types of colonies. The development of 
colonial institutions in the seventeenth century is also given attention, and the 
course concludes with a consideration of the revolutionary outbreaks that marked 
the end of the reactionary colonial policy under the Restoration. 

2. Modern European History, 1789-1920. Associate Professor 

Bond. G and C 10.30 G 305 

This course includes a brief survey of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era, 
followed by a more detailed study of the work of the Congress of Vienna and of 
European political, social, and economic history from 1815 down to the present. 

Stress is laid upon the growth of democracy and nationality in the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries, and especially upon the forces since 1870 that led to the 
Great War. There will be a brief study of the progress of the war, of the peace 
treaties, and of the problems of reconstruction. 

Text: Hazen, Modern European History, Rev. Ed., 1919 (Holt), 

3. American History, 1789-1920. Associate Professor Bond. C 

8.30 G 305 

A course in American political, social and economic development from the estab- 
lishment of the Constitution. Special emphasis is laid upon American progress 
since the Civil War, upon the relation of the United States to the Great War, and 
upon its present international position. 

Texts: The Riverside History of the United States; Vol. II, Johnson, Union and 
Democracy; Vol. in, Dodd, Expansion and Conflict; Vol. iv, Paxson, The New 
Nation (Houghton Mifflin). 

4. Greek History. Associate Professor Ebeling. C 9.30 G 108 

The early iEgean civilization, Homeric Age, Colonial expansion, state and 
national development in Greece, Persian wars, growth of Sparta and Athens, con- 
flicts between aristocracy and democracy. Library readings will be available. 
Lectures, reports and discussions. 

Text: Botsford, A History of the Orient and Greece (Macmillan). 

JOURNALISM 

1. The Forms of Contemporary Prose Writing. Associate Pro- 
fessor French. C 10.30 G 311 

A study of the rhetorical principles involved in effective writing, as illustrated 
by the best contemporary journalism. The work of this course will be so planned 
as to co-operate with Course 2. It may, however, be taken separately. 

Text: Cunliffe and Lomer, Writing of Today, Rev. Ed. (Century Co.)- 



22 Summer Courses [118 

2. The Principles and Practice of Journalism. Mr. Porter. C 
11.30 G 311 

This course of .lectures on journalism and practical exercises in newspaper work 
includes discussions of the journalistic style, news stories, the reporter and his 
work, the departments of a modern newspaper, and the technical processes of publi- 
cation. 

The course is given in co-operation with The Sun s Baltimore. A limited number 
of members of the class will receive appointments on its staff, and will find in 
Courses 1 and 2 and in the daily routine of the reporter's life, a thorough introduc- 
tion to modern journalism. Such members of the class as cannot receive these 
appointments will, nevertheless, have the opportunity to study the making of a 
newspaper in practice, to use the plant of The Sun as a laboratory for such study, 
and to write under the direction and criticism of a member of its editorial staff. 

Three scholarships have been provided by The Sun to be awarded to students 
taking Journalism 1 and 2 and any other related course. Applications, with 
detailed statements of training and experience, should be filed with the Director 
prior to Thursday, July 1. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

1. Bench Work in Wood. Mr. Gaither. C 8.30-10.20 BPIM 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper 
grades of the elementary schools, outlining courses, planning equipments, and 
methods of individual and class exercises. , 

Advanced work in both hard and soft woods, and instruction in the use of the 
following machines is included : grinders, speed lathes, band saw, circular saw, 
and planer. 

Teachers of shop work in junior high schools will find this course most helpful. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 

Note. — 'Previous training in this work is not required for admission to this 
course. 

2. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. C 11.30 B P 

I 120 

This course includes hand-work processes in paper, cardboard, weaving, raffia, 
sand table, basketry, bookkeeping and woodwork suitable for the first six years 
of the elementary schools, and in materials suitable for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will find this 
course adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

3. Mechanical Drawing. Mr. Gaither. C 10.30 B P I 205 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of teachers of mechanical 
drawing in junior high schools, manual training and vocational schools. 

Emphasis is placed on the functional value of mechanical drawing to related 
subjects. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. Students will provide their own drawing instruments. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing courses 1 and 3 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore city schools, pro- 
vided they are graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements to 
the secondary schools of Baltimore. 

In arranging their schedule, students will note that the courses in Manual Train- 
ing will be given at the Polytechnic Institute, North Avenue and Calvert Street. 

MATHEMATICS 
1. Advanced Mathematics. Dr. Cohen. G 10.30 G 2 

The line of work to be pursued will be selected from the following: 

(a) Geometrical transformations ; 

(b) Elliptic functions. 

(c) Finite groups. 



119] Courses of Instruction 23 

2. Analytics. Dr. Cohen. C 11.30 G 2 

In case of sufficient demand, calculus will be substituted for this course. 

3. Trigonometry. Dr. Cohen. 12.30 G 2 

MUSIC 

The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, July 5 to August 14. Its program includes courses in 
Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello, Composition, Harmony, Form and Analysis, 
Interpretation, Piano Pedagogy, Theory, Ear Training, and Musical Literature. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science may offer for credit 
courses in music, when officially reported by the Conservatory as having been satis- 
factorily completed, in accordance with the plan of co-operation between the 
University and the Conservatory. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 

PHILOSOPHY 

1. Pragmatism. Dr. Thalheimer. C 10.30 G 113 

A survey of the pragmatic movement as developed by James, Schiller, and Dewey. 

2. Introduction to Philosophy. Dr. Thalheimer. C 12.30 G 

113 

A discussion of some of the problems that have confronted thinkers of all times. 
Text: Fullerton, Introduction to Philosophy (Macmillan). 

POLITICS 

1. State Government. Assistant Professor Lonn. G and C 11.30 

G 320 

This course studies the framework of our state governments with particular 
attention to Maryland. Attention is given to recent features, such as the growing 
power of the governor, the budget, corrupt practices legislation, the short ballot 
and the direct primary. 

Text: Holcombe, State Government in the United States (Macmillan). 

2. Municipal Government. Assistant Professor Lonn. G and C 

12.30 G 320 

The organization and administration of city government in the United States, 
including municipal home rule, commission government, the city manager, the 
initiative, referendum, and recall. 

Text: Munro. The Government of American Cities (Macmillan). 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. Research in Psychology. Assistant Professor Bagby. G 
G 401 

Opportunity to conduct experimental investigation is given to students adequately 
prepared. Laboratory periods of not less than ten hours per week are required. 

Note. — Students desiring to investigate special problems are requested to com- 
municate with the instructor as early as possible in order that all necessary special 
apparatus may be on hand at the opening of the session. 



24 Summer Courses [120 

2. Psychology of the Emotions. Assistant Professor Bagby. 

G and C 11.30 G 401 

The function of the emotions in human behavior will be the chief topic of this 
course. Types of emotional behavior will be demonstrated in the classroom. 

3. Introductory Psychology. Assistant Professor Bagby. C 

10.30 G 401 

Beginning the study of the mental life as a function of the reactions of the 
organism, perception, feeling, and thought are considered in the light of the essen- 
tial reactions involved. The relation of instinct and habit in behavior will be 
indicated. 

SPANISH 

1. Spanish Literature. Mr. Merrill. G and C 9.30 G 103 

By lectures and readings a rapid survey of Spanish literature is undertaken, 
special emphasis being laid on lyric poetry. Any modification of the course neces- 
sary to meet the needs of students will be made. Advanced students will do 
supplementary work. 

Texts: Ford, Spanish Anthology (Silver, Burdett) ; Ford, Main Currents of Spanish 
Literature ,(Holt) ; Fitzmaurice-iKelley, Spanish Literature (Appleton). 

2. Practical Spanish. Mr. Merrill. C 8.30 G 103 

Spanish is the language of the classroom. The course includes conversational 
practice and regular exercises in prose composition. The course is also designed 
to meet the needs of teachers of Spanish in secondary schools, attention being given 
to the purpose, material and methods of this instruction. A knowledge of Spanish 
Elements is pre-requisite. 

Texts: Wilkins, First Spanish Book (Holt) ; Wilkins, Spanish in the High 
Schools: A Handbook of Methods (Sanborn) ; Cool, Spanish Composition (Gdnn). 

3. Elementary Spanish. Mr. Merrill. C 12.30 G 103 

Grammar, reading, composition, with special stress on pronunciation and oral 
exercises. 

Texts: Bushee, Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar (Sanborn) ; Pittaro, A Spanish 
Reader (Heath), and probably, Ballard and Stewart, Short Stories for Oral Spanish 
(Scribner's). 



SCHEDULE 



8.30— $.20 

Education 1 

Education 4 

Education 8 

Education 9 

Education 15 

Education 18 

Education 21 

Education 25 (8.30—10.20) 

English Literature 1 

French 1 

German 3 

History 3 

Manual Training 1 (8.80—10.20) 

Spanish 2 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Economics 2 
Education 6 
Education 10 
Education 12 
Education 13 

Education 17 (9.30—12.20) 
Education 23 
Education 24 
Education 25 (continued) 
English Literature 2 
German 2 
History 4 

Manual Training 1 (continued) 
Spanish 1 

10.30—11.20 

Chemistry 1 

Education 3 

Education 7 

Education 14 

Education 17 (continued) 

Education 22 
English Composition 2 
French 3 



German 1 
History 2 
Journalism 1 
Manual Training 3 
Mathematics 1 
Philosophy 1 
Psychology 3 

11.30^12.20 
Biology 3 
Chemistry 3 
Classical Literature 
Economics 1 
Education 2 
Education 5 

Education 17 (continued) 
English Composition 1 
French 2 
History 1 
Journalism 2 
Manual Training 2 
Mathematics 2 
Politics 1 
Psychology 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Education 11 

Education 16 (Conference) 
Education 19 
Education 20 
English Literature 3 
Mathematics 3 
Philosophy 2 
Politics 2 
Spanish 3 

1.30—4.20 

Chemical Laboratory 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Psychological Laboratory 



8.30—12.30 Demonstration School. Classes will be open for observation Monday, 
July 12. 

The hours of Chemistry 2 and Psychology 1 will be arranged. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 350 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Degree A, B. 

(Open to Men) 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

Degrees B. Eng. and S. B. in Chem. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Degrees D. P. H., S. D., and S. B. in Hyg. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B. and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSE FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS 
AND IN ENGINEERING 
(Open to Men and Women) » 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



New Series, 1921 Whole Number 329 

No1 "mimr*^ 



THE 



i»w»r 




JOHNS HOPKIN: 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 5— AUGUST 12 
1921 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued March, April, June, July, October, November 



MARCH, 1921 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md., as second class matter, under 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for., in Section 1103, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 3, 1918 



CALENDAR, 1921 



June 21, Tuesday — Commencement Day. 



June 27-July 2. } » •• -^ gifi^g** ati »' 

July 5, Tuesday — 18.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 

begins. 

July 9, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 

August 12, Friday — Close of Summer Courses. 



October 4, Tuesday — Forty-sixth regular session begins. 

October 10, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, thirteenth year 
begins. 

October 11, Tuesday — Night Courses for Technical Workers, sixth 
year begins. 

October 17, Monday — Night Courses in Business Economics, sixth 
year begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Tuesday morning, July 5, accord- 
ing to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that students 
should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening exercise 
of each course which they intend to pursue. 

Registration should be made prior to July 5. 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 
1921 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 
Director of the Summer Courses 

Thomas R. Ball 
Registrar 

W. Graham Boyce 

Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

English Bagby, Ph. D. Psychology 

Instructor in Psychology, Yale University. 

Lawrence H. Baker, Ph. D. Classical Literature and History 

Instructor in Greek and History. 

Alice E. Barnard, A. M. Education 

Assistant in Secondary Education, Teachers College, Columbia University. 
Leslie C. Beard, Jr., A. B. Chemistry 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Frances M. Berry, Ph. B. Education 

Supervisor of Kindergarten-Primary, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Lloyd Millard Bertholf, A. B. Biology 

Assistant in Biology. 

Beverley W. Bond, Jr., Ph. D. History 

Associate Professor of History, University of Cincinnati. 

Fowler D. Brooks, A. M. Education 

Associate in Education. 

Corinne Brown, A.M. Education 

Teacher in Tower Hill School, Wilmington, Del. ; Instructor in Primary 
Methods, University of Delaware. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Education 

Director ; Professor of Education. 

1 



Summer Courses 



William Burdick, M. D. 

Director, Public Athletic League, Baltimore. 



Education 



Biology 



Rheinart P. Cowles, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Niels H. Debel, Ph. D. Political Science 

Professor of Political Science, Goucher College. 

Raymond A. Denslow, A. B. Education 

Teacher of 'General Science, Physics, and Chemistry, The Scarborough School, 
Scarborough, New York. 

John Denues. Public School Music 

Supervisor of Music, Baltimore Public Schools. 

Carleton E. Douglass, A. M. Education 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Baltimore. 

Lida B. Earhart, Ph. D. Education 

Professor of Elementary Education, University of Nebraska. 

Agnes M. Flinn. Education 

Leader of Public Athletic League ; Instructor in Physical Education, The 
Park School, Baltimore. 

George M. Gaither. Manual Training 

Supervisor of 'Manual Training, Baltimore Public Schools. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

George R. Havens, Ph. D. French 

Assistant Professor of French, Ohio State University. 

Jesse W. Hubbard, A. M. Education 

Professor of 'Geography, State Normal School, Worcester, Mass. 



Arthur W. Kallom, A. M. 



Education 



Assistant Director, Department of Educational Investigation and Measure- 
ment, Boston Public Schools. 



Eugene B. Link. 

Instructor in Electricity, 

Homer P. Little, Ph. D 



Manual Training 



Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 



Geography 

Executive Secretary, Division of Geology and Geography, National Research 
Council, Washington, D. C. 



Francis E. A. Litz, A. M. 

Instructor in English. 

Elmer V. MoCollum, Ph. D. 

Professor of Bio-Chemistry. 

Ray M. Merrill, A. M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Broadus Mitchell, Ph. D. 

Instructor in Political Economy. 



English 

School Hygiene 

Spanish 

Economics 



Instructors 3 

Francis D. Murnagiian. Pit. D. Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles A. Pettit. Manual Training 

Instructor in Carpentry and Pattern Shop, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 

Warren D. Renninger, Ph. D. Education 

Professor of History, Central High School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ballard D. Remy, A. M. Education 

Principal, Forest Park Junior High School, Springfield, Mass. 

Jose Robles t Pazos, Lie. en Let. Spanish 

Instructor in Spanish. 

Jonathan T. Rorer. Ph. D. Education 

Head of Department of Mathematics, The William Penn High School for Girls, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Instructor in Education, College Courses for Teachers. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate Professor of German. 

James E. Rotjth, Ph. D. English 

Lanier Professor of English, Oglethorpe University. 

Mabel E. Simpson. Education 

Director of Elementary Grades and Kindergartens, Rochester Public Schools. 
Alvin Thalheimer, Ph. D. Philosophy 

Instructor in Philosophy, College Courses for Teachers. 

Raymond S. Tompkins, LL. B. Journalism 

Editorial Staff of The Sun, Baltimore, Md. 

Maurice S. H. Unger, A. M. Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Carroll County, Md. 

David E. Weglein, Ph. D. Education 

Associate in Education ; Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Baltimore. 

Frances Zuill, A.M. Rome Economics 

Supervisor of Home Economics, Baltimore Public Schools. 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

Kindergarten and Elementary Grades 

Isabel Lazarus Kindergarten 

Edith R. Powell Grade I 

Marguerite M. Wrede Grade II 

Helen K. Grote Grade III 

Winifred E. Barrett Grade IV 

To be selected Grade V 

To be selected Grade VI 

Junior High Grader 
Maud Brown 
Ethel IMelvin 
To be selected 
To be selected 



M 


109 


M 


119 


M 


117 


M 


217 


m 


202 


m 


206 


M 


121 


c 


114 


c 


115 


c 


117 


C 215 



Summer Courses 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The eleventh year of the Summer Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Tuesday, July 5, and continue until Friday, 
August 12, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be held every 
week-day, Monday to Friday. In addition, on Saturday, July 9, 
classes will meet as usual. Each course will consist of thirty class 
exercises or their equivalent. In the sciences laboratory work will 
be additional. Examinations will be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Faculties, they are an integral part of 
the work of the University. All the resources of the institution 
essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses 
offered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate 
students who wish to advance their standing or to make up defi- 
ciences; others, to enable non-matriculated students to absolve in 
part the entrance requirements. Also courses in some subjects not 
given in the regular session are offered to meet special needs of 
schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing 
graduate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced 
to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular 
class exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work 
of the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs 
of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

(In co-operation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners, 
a demonstration elementary and junior high school will be conducted 
as a means of affording illustrative material for the courses in edu- 
cation. This school will comprise two sections: one, an elementary 
department, consisting of a kindergarten and grades one to six, 
inclusive; the other, a junior high department, providing instruction 



General Statement 5 

in important subjects in grades seven, eight and nine. This will be 
one of the city vacation schools in which pupils will be given an 
opportunity to secure promotion at the beginning of the next school 
year. Children whose parents are residents of Baltimore will be 
permitted to attend this school free of all charges for tuition and 
material of instruction. 

Other city elementary and secondary vacation schools will be open 
during the session and available for observation in connection with 
the courses in elementary and secondary education. 

SELECTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for advanced degrees should arrange their programs 
in consultation with the departments in which their principal sub- 
jects lie. New students expecting to become candidates should pre- 
sent their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
College Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, in 
the selection of courses that will meet requirements for the degree. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the 
regulations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners 
to whom their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with this rule 
of the Board of University Studies : the requirement of one of the 
two years of residence for this degree may be met by attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for any of the baccalaureate 
degrees will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those 
courses designated by C. In general the same credit is given per 
hour as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two " points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an addi- 
tional credit to exceed fifty per cent, be given, nor can a total credit 



6 Summer Courses 

of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer 
session. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 
cates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, County, and City Superintendents an<J 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 5, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. The Eegistrar's office (219 
Gilman Hall) will be open for registration daily from Monday, June 
27, to Saturday, July 2, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. After July 7, 
admission to each course will be restricted to registered students. 
With the consent of the Director, students may make changes in 
their courses, which must be reported in person to the Registrar, 
up to and including July 7. After this date no change of courses 
will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory fees, must 
be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in registration. 
Attention is called to the fee of $3.00 for the privilege of registration 
after July 5. 

NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles street at 32d and 34th streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line cars marked " Guilford-Union 
Station"; from the Mount Royal Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
walking two blocks east to Charles street; and from Union Station 
(Pa., N. C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles 
street, marked "Roland Park" or "Guilford-Union Station"; and 
also by the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles street. One 
should alight at 32d or at 34th street. 



Summer Courses 



EXPENSES 

The regular tuition fee is $30.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. An additional course, 
with the exceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may 
be attended, with the approval of the Director, upon the payment 
of an extra fee of $12.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a 
student may register in one course only, the tuition fee in such 
case being $20, unless otherwise noted in the statement of any par- 
ticular course.) 

The tuition fee for officers and teachers employed in public schools 
in the counties of Maryland, as evidenced by superintendent's cer- 
tificates, is $15.00, payment of which entitles such persons to register 
in two or three courses. Students failing to attend regularly the 
courses in which they have registered will be subject to the payment 
of the full fee. 

Failure to register and pay tuition and laboratory fees before the 
close of July 5 will entail an additional fee of $3.00. 

Registration and payment of fees should be made in person or by 
mail in advance of the opening of the session. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some of the 
courses. (For details, see statements of courses.) 

No reduction of fees will be allowed for withdrawal after July 6th. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn to the 
order of the Johns Hopkins University. For the convenience of 
students while in residence at the University, the Treasurer will 
receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment upon collection. 
There is no charge for this service. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board will be furnished at the Johns Hopkins Club, located in the 
Carroll Mansion on the campus. Men and women in attendance are 
eligible for summer membership, the fee being $2.00. This fee is 
payable by all who are not regular members of the Club. Member- 
ship cards are issued by the Director upon registration at the Uni- 
versity. The Club will open with luncheon, Monday, July 4, and 
close with dinner, Saturday, August 13. Board is furnished at $9.00 
per week. Luncheons are served singly at 50 cents. The dairy lunch 
room in the Student Activities Building will be open daily during 
the session. 

The University has no dormitories. Furnished rooms in private 
homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent at prices 
ranging from $3.00 to $7.00 per week for a single room. Beard can 



i 



General Statement 9 

be had in private boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices 
ranging from $8.00 to $13.00 per week. A printed list of boarding 
and lodging houses will be sent upon request. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

111 addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening 
and closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and 
recitals which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday 
evening, in co-operation with the Summer Session of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 

EXCURSIONS 

Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington, D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

THE UNIVERSITY POST-OFFICE AND BOOK-STORE 

The University post-office, in Gilman Hall, will be open. Students 
may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book -Store (102 Gilman Hall) supplies 
officers and students with text books, stationery, and other materials 
at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. The Director, Dr. French, will be found in his office (303 
Gilman Hall) during the session. 

SUMMER WORK FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning Tuesday, June 6th, and ending Thursday, July 16th, a 
course in medical diagnosis, including laboratory exercises in clinical 
pathology and demonstrations in pathological anatomy, will be 
offered. The course will be limited to twenty students, fee $100. 
Applications should be made to the Dean of the Medical School of 
Ihe University. 



10 Summer Courses 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Explanation of Symbols in Titles of Courses. 

C and G preceding the hour indicate that the course may be offered for colle- 
giate and graduate credit, respectively. 

The final initial and number indicate the building and classroom: G, Gilman 
Hall ; C, Civil Engineering ; M, Mechanical Engineering ; B. P. I., Baltimore 
Polytechnic Institute. 



BIOLOGY 

1. General Biology. Associate Professor Cowles and Mr. Bert- 

holf. C 9.30 G 11 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
and comparison, with the aid of the microscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex. The lectures deal with the 
manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and point out our 
present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Macmillan) ; Andrews, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology and Embryology (Johns Hopkins Press). 

2. Zoology. Associate Professor Cowles and Mr. Bertholf. C 

12.30 G 11 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior of 
these animals as well as their structure is studied, including occasional field 
excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming better 
acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures are devoted to the more 
general problems of zoological science. 

Texts : Hegner, College Zoology (Macmillan) ; Pratt, Invertebrate Zoology 
(Ginn). 

Laboratory fee: $1.50, for each course. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin and Mr. Beard. G M 

104 10-10.50 and 11-11.50; Laboratory, 12.30-4.20 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students who have not had 
a systematic course in organic chemistry, and also to those who wish to prepare 
for entrance to the Medical School or to the School of Hygiene. In order to 
satisfy the requirements of these schools, the course will consist of two hours 
lectures and four hours laboratory work daily. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Norris, Laboratory Manual of 
Organic Chemistry (MoGraw Hill Book Co.). 

Laboratory fee: $12.00. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. Professor Gilpin and Mr. Beard. G 

and C C 20 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in qualitative analysis. Laboratory is open from 10 
a. m. to 4.20 p. m. 

Laboratory fee: $7.00. 



Courses of Instruction 11 

3. Quantitative Analysis. Professor Gilpin and Mr. Beard. G 

>and C C 20 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in quantitative analysis. Laboratory is open from 10 
a. m. to 4.20 p. m. 

Laboratory fee: $7.00. 

4. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin and 

Mr. Beard. C 12.30 M 104 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It will include, 
as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the important non-metallic and 
metallic elements and their properties. 

Text : * McPherson and Henderson, A Course in General Chemistry with labora- 
tory manual (Ginn). 

Laboratory fee: $7.00. 

The fee for materials in the several courses does not include the cost of small 
pieces of apparatus not returnable, and the charge for breakage to be paid at the 
close of the session. This additional expense averages about $2.00. 

CLASSICAL LITERATURE 
Outline of Greek Literature. Dr. Baker. G and C 11.30 G 108 

A rapid survey will be made of Greek literature from Homer to Theocritus. 
Selected translations will be read and Greek influence upon Roman and English 
literature will be indicated. 

Text: Wright, Greek Literature (American Book Co.). 

ECONOMICS 

1. Social Legislation. Dr. Mitchell. G and C 10.30 G 315 

This course finds its basis in English experience — the history of child labor, 
the factory acts, and the poor law. Reference will, however, constantly be had 
to American legislation. In the last lectures some peculiarly present-day problems 
will be discussed. 

2. Economic History of England. Dr. Mitchell. C 9.30 G 315 

The ways in which economic happenings and tendencies influenced the life of 
the people will be shown, and the relationship between economic history and 
economic thought will be dwelt upon. The period covered will be that from the 
earliest times through the industrial revolution. 

Text: Ashley, Industrial Organization of England (Longmans, Green & Co.). 

3. Elements of Political Economy. Dr. Mitchell. C 12.30 

G 315 

This course undertakes a simple statement of the fundamental principles of the 
science, to equip the student to make some analysis of his economic environment. 
Besides such topics as profits, interest, rent, wages, business organization, foreign 
trade, money and taxation, time will be devoted to labor problems and current 
proposals for social reform. 

Text: Clay, Economics for the General Reader (Macmillan). 

EDUCATION 
1. Educational Administration. Mr. Kallom. G 12.30 G 212 

Attention is given to the recent developments in the treatment of administra- 
tive problems of school systems. The topics to be considered include making a 
school budget, salary schedule, merit basis of teacher promotion, administrative 
uses of intelligence and performance tests, the reorganization of school systems 
and courses of study, with special attention to the present administrative prob- 
lems of members of the class. The presentation of a report of the results of an 
intensive study of a particular problem is expected of each member. 



12 Summer Courses 

2. Experimental Education: Tests in Secondary School Sub- 

jects. Mr. Kallom. G 11.30 G 216 

A study of scales and tests in English, United States history, civics, mathe- 
matics, geography and other subjects, available for guidance in instructional con- 
trol in the junior and senior high school. 

Three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 

3. Experimental Education: Tests in Elementary School Sub- 

jects. Mr. Kallom. G 9.30 G 216 

A critical study of the standardized scales and group survey method of testing 
pupil achievements in elementary school subjects; interpretation of the statistical 
data; relation of the results to intelligence levels; corrective material for use in 
the school room. Special material will be derived from tests given in the Demon- 
stration School. 

Three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 

Text: Wilson and Hoke, How to Measure (Macmillan). 

4. Experimental Education: Intelligence of School Children. 

Mr. Brooks. G 8.30 G 212 

This course presents the following topics: principles and technique of rating 
the intelligence of school children ; the development and forms of intelligence tests, 
both individual and group; statistical evaluation and graphical presentation of 
data; interpretation and application of results with special reference to the 
classification and instruction of children. Provision is made for practice in giving 
and scoring tests. 

Three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 

Text: Terman, The Measurement of Intelligence (Houghton Mifflin). 

5. Educational Psychology: Secondary School Subjects. Mr. 

Brooks. G 12.30 G 216 

Analysis of the learning processes in the following junior and senior high school 
subjects : English, foreign languages, mathematics (arithmetic, algebra, and 
geometry), science, history, and manual arts. 

Lectures, readings and reports. 

Text: Judd, The Psychology of the High School Subjects (Ginn). 

6. Educational Psychology: Elementary School Subjects. Mr. 

Brooks. G and C 10.30 G 216 

Analysis of the learning processes with special reference to reading and arith- 
metic ; some attention given to handwriting, drawing, language and composition. 

Four lectures and two hours laboratory work per week. 

Texts: Thorndike, Psychology of Arithmetic (Macmillan) ; Freeman, The Psy- 
chology of the Common Branches (Houghton Mifflin). 

7. School Hygiene. Professor McCollum. G and C 8.30 G 216 

This course is based upon a critical examination of the published literature dis- 
seminated for the guidance of teachers, nurses and health workers whose activities 
are directed toward improving the physical condition of children of pre-school and 
school ages. The object will be to enable the teacher and school official to judge 
concerning the relative importance of the several factors which relate to physical 
development and the promotion of health. 

This course is given in cooperation with the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health, under the auspices of the De Lamar Foundation for the Extension of 
Medical Knowledge. De Lamar Scholarships have been made available for stu- 
dents registering in this course alone. Application should be made to the Di- 
rector before July 1. 

Tuition fee: $5, for students registering in this course alone. 



Courses of Instruction 13 



Secondary Education 

8. Secondary Education. Dr. Weglein. G and C 9.30 G 310 

This course deals with some of the principal topics in secondary education ; 
the historical development and function of the American high school ; comparisons 
with secondary schools in other countries ; the main problems connected with the 
program of studies; extra class-room activities; supervised study; methods of 
instruction. 

Text: Inglis, Principles of Secondary Education (Houghton Mifflin). 

Note: — The full course on Secondary Education given in the regular session, of 
which this is approximately the first half, may be completed in the second half- 
year of the College Courses for Teachers. 

9. The Teaching of English Composition in Secondary Schools. 

Miss Barnard. G and C 1.30 G 310 

In this course is included the study of theme subjects, methods of making 
assignments, criticism and rating of papers, the conference, texts, and other 
matters vital to effective composition teaching. The aims of composition teaching 
and means for measuring the results of teaching are considered. 

10. The Teaching of English Literature in Secondary Schools. 

Miss Barnard. G and C 11.30 G 310 

This course includes a consideration of the materials and the methods to be 
used in the teaching of literature in secondary schools. Various problems are 
discussed and solutions suggested. The course is carried on by means of lectures, 
discussions, outside reading, making of model lessons. 

11. The Teaching of Algebra and Geometry in Secondary 

Schools. Dr. Rorer. G and C 1.30 G 2 

Educational values and place in the curriculum; courses adapted to senior high 
schools; discussion of the merits of recent and of well-established texts; class- 
room methods and practice; important reports and references to journals; diag- 
nostic tests and their use. 

Each student should be provided with some high school algebra and geometry, 
and with one of the following reference books : Smith, The Teaching of Elementary 
Mathematics (Macmillan) ; Young, The Teaching of Mathematics (Longmans, Green 
& Co.) ; Schultze, The Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School (Mac- 
millan). 

12. The Teaching of History in Secondary Schools. Professor 

Eenninger. G and C 1.30 G 305 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers of history in secondary 
schools. Its aim is to furnish instruction in the best methods and materials to 
be used, with a view to their practical application in the class-room. The prin- 
ciples and methods are developed by the study of approved literature on the 
subject, lesson plans, maps, devices and helps in recitations, and other aids. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions. 

13. The Teaching of Civics in Secondary Schools. Professor 

Renninger. G and C 9.30 G 305 

The purpose of this course is to furnish instruction in the teaching of civics 
to teachers in secondary schools. It examines from the teacher's viewpoint the 
place of civics in the curriculum, its relation to the school sciences, and its 
function in the training for citizenship, as well as directing attention to the 
machinery of government. Special consideration will be given to the organization 
of material, teaching helps, and class-room presentation. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions. 



14 Summer Courses 

14. The Teaching of Science in the Senior High School. Mr. 

Denslow. G and C 11.30 C 5 

The aim of this course is to aid teachers of biology, chemistry, and physics in 
senior high schools by interpreting the current movements in instruction in science. 
Practical help is offered to the inexperienced teacher in the daily problems of 
class-room and laboratory management, text-book selection, and care of equipment. 

Students should have in hand Re- organization of Science in Secondary Schools, 
Bulletin, 1920, No. 26, Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C. 

15. The Junior High School. Mr. Remy. G and C 10.30 G 310 

The reorganization of education, historical survey of the junior high school, 
articulation of junior high schools with elementary schools and with senior high 
schools, provision for individual differences, programs of study, problems of ad- 
ministration and supervision. 

Text: Briggs, The Junior High School (Houghton Mifflin). 

16. Materials and Methods in the Junior High School. Mr. 

Eemy. G and C 8.30 G 310 

This course considers: . the subject matter of instruction necessary to fulfill 
the aims and purposes of this type of school; combination of subjects into pro- 
grams of study; methods of teaching in general, and as applied to different 
subjects; problem and project method; socialized recitation; supervised study. A 
small amount of time is devoted to discussing the problems of the teacher pecu- 
liar to this type of organization. 

Text: Strayer and Norsworthy, How to Teach (Macmillan). 

17. The Teaching of Mathematics in the Junior High School. 

Dr. Rorer. G and C 9.30 G 2 

This course gives detailed attention to the teaching of junior high school mathe- 
matics based upon the latest courses of study, texts, current reports, and the use 
of diagnostic mathematical tests. Special consideration will be given to the 
Baltimore course in mathematics for junior high schools. 

Each student should be provided with one or more sets of the junior high 
school mathematics texts now on the market. 

18. The Teaching of General Science in the Junior High 

School. Mr. Denslow. G and C 1.30 C 5 

The history of the development of the course in general science in secondary 
schools; the justification of the course; comparison of the various types of 
general science courses in junior high schools; comparison of methods in present 
practice; the relative merits of textbooks; practical exercises and demonstration 



19. The Teaching of Geography in the Junior High School. 

Professor Hubbard. G and C 10.30 C 5 

A study of regional geography through selected types is the basis of the course. 
Among the topics considered are: division of the continents into regional units; 
the human geography of selected regions; the formation and solution of problem- 
projects; the use of outline maps and other supplementary material. Attention 
is given to methods of teaching topics in mathematical geography in which 
teachers usually experience difficulty, such as seasons, latitude, longitude, time 
relations, and also to the new geographic boundaries of countries affected by the 
peace treaties. Students are assigned work involving application of the methods 
discussed. Practical field work is offered. 

20. Supervised Study in the Junior High School. Miss Simpson. 

G and C 12.30 C 202 
This course is intended primarily for teachers of the junior high school, but 
will be of value to teachers of other grades as well as to principals. Various 
types of supervised study now in operation are explained and studied, including 
the divided period plan. Special attention is given to: the meaning of study; 
the evaluation of the course of study with its organization into units of instruc- 
tion and units of recitation; lesson types with particular emphasis upon the 
socialized lesson; lesson plans and provision for individual differences; prepara 
tion in the sixth grade for supervised study in the junior high school. 



Courses of Instruction 15 

21 A. Demonstration School: Junior High Grades. Professor 
Buchner and Dr. Weglein. G and C 12.30 M 114 

Demonstration lessons in many of the subjects taught in grades seven, eight, 
and nine. A description of the requirements for credit for this course is given 
in Education 21 B. 

The conferences, 12.30 p. m., will begin Tuesday, July 5, and the observation 
of teaching, Wednesday, July 6. 

Note. — For additional courses presenting material on teaching secondary school 
subjects see: English Literature 1 and 3; French 3; Geography 2; Home Econo- 
mics 1 and 2; Manual Training 1, 2, 3, It, and 5; Music 2; Spanish 2. 

Elementary Education 

21 B. Demonstration School: Elementary Grades. Professor 
Buchner and Dr. Weglein. C 12.30 M 114 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching 
process by means of systematic observation, conferences, and reports. The school 
will be in session daily from 8.30 a. m. to 12.20 p. m. These classes are open 
for observation only to those registered for this course. The elementary depart- 
ment will include a kindergarten and grades one, two, three, four, five, and six. 

The requirement for those taking the course for credit (one point) is a total of 
six conferences (12.30 p. m.), twenty-four observation hours, and two written 
reports. The two written reports must be filed in the office of the Director, 217 
Gilman Hall, not later than Monday, August 8. Reports filed after this date will 
not be accepted. 

The conferences, 12.30 p. m., will begin Tuesday, July 5, and the observation of 
teaching, Wednesday, July 6. 

22. The Organization and Supervision of City Elementary 

Schools. Mr. Douglass. C 11.30 G 312 

This course considers the principal as a supervisor, and as a social and an 
educational agent. The chief topics are: the making of courses of study; 
classification and promotion of pupils; departmental teaching; types of supervision; 
school statistics; extra-classroom activities; health; play; relation of school to 
home and community. 

23. School Management and School Law. Mr. Unger. C 8.30 

G 311 

This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers who wish to qualify as 
principals, to improve principals in service, and to give teacher and principal 
a perspective of a properly organized school in a county system. It includes a con- 
sideration of the Report on the Cardinal Principles of Secondary Education, the 
six-three-three plan of school organization, the elements of curricula-making, the 
consideration of a well-balanced daily and weekly program, the supervision of 
the school, measuring the achievements of children and a study of teachers' 
marks, attendance and retardation, discipline and punishment, extra-curricular 
activities, the health of the school-child, school administration, and the princi- 
pal's responsibility under the Maryland School Law. 

Text: Finney and Schaffer, Administration of Village and Consolidated Schools 
(Macmillan). 

24. Types of Teaching and Teaching How to Study. Professor 

Earhart. C 11.30 C 202 

Discussion and illustration of types of teaching exercises in the elementary 
school; nature of study, and training pupils in right habits of study; illustrative 
lessons observed. 

25. Intermediate Grade Methods. Mr. Douglass. C 1.30 G 311 

This course aims to present the theory and practice of teaching in the \ipper 
grades of the elementary school. The topics include: characteristics and needs 
of children; individual differences; motivation of school work; socializing the 
recitation and the school; type lessons; methods of instruction with special em- 
phasis upon the uses of the problem and the project; testing pupil achievements. 



16 Summer Courses 

26. The Teaching of Reading in the Intermediate Grades. Miss 

(Simpson. C 10.30 G 314 

In the consideration of the problems of teaching reading in the upper grades 
of the elementary school, special phases of the study of reading are considered: 
psychology, pedagogy and hygiene of reading; specific aims and attainments for 
each grade; the choice of material: basal texts and supplementary material; dic- 
tionary study; determination of quality and rate; standardized and informal tests; 
diagnosis of individual difficulties; remedial measures. 

Texts : Huey, The Psychology and Pedagogy of Reading (M acmillan) ; Klapper, 
The Teaching of Reading (Appleton). 

27. English Literature and Language in the Intermediate 

iGrades. Professor Earhart. C 9.30 G 314 
The special fields of oral English, composition, and literature, and the problems 
of each; selection and use of materials in the intermediate grades; the use of 
motives or projects in English teaching; standards of accomplishment; lessons 
observed and discussed. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

28. Arithmetic in the Grades. Professor Earhart. C 12.30 

G 310 

Selection of material to be taught; basis for rejection; adaptation of subject- 
matter to the grades; teaching mechanical processes; teaching processes involving 
reasoning; socializing the content of arithmetic; possibilities of economizing time; 
lessons observed and discussed. 

Lectures, assigned readings, and reports. 

29. The Teaching of Geography in the Intermediate Grades. 

Professor Hubbard. \C 1.30 IC 105 

The importance and place of home geography in relation to the development 
of the subject; the content and method of observational field work; sources and 
use of illustrative material and the importance of visual instruction; interpreta- 
tion of the various kinds of maps; methods of approach in the presentation of 
topics; the use of simple projects for motivating work; the correlation of geogra- 
phy and history. 

30. The Teaching of History and Civics in the Intermediate 

Grades. Miss Simpson. C 8.30 >G 314 

This course is for teachers of the upper grades of the elementary school. The 
theory and practice of teaching history and civics are reviewed. Specific aims 
and attainments for each grade are formulated. Courses of study are analyzed 
and units of subject-matter/ organized for each grade. A study is made of some 
of the most recent texts. The value of collateral reading is discussed and the 
place of current events in its relation to the teaching of history and civics in 
these grades is considered. 

Text: Johnson, Teaching of History (Macmillan). 

31. Materials and Methods in Kindergarten-Primary Educa- 

tion. Miss Berry. C 8.30 G 112 

The purposes of this course are: first, to study children's characteristics and 
thereby determine their needs ; second, to select subject-matter, materials, and 
methods which will meet these needs. 

Texts: Each student is expected to be provided with at least one of the follow- 
ing: Johnson, Education by Plays and Games (Ginn) ; Terman, Hygiene of the 
School Child (Houghton Mifflin) ; Norsworthy and Whitley, Psychology of Child- 
hood (Macmillan) ; Gesell, The Normal Child and Primary Education (Ginn). 

32. Primary Grade Methods. Miss Berry. C 11.30 G 112 

This course considers: first, manual, industrial, and social activities appropriate 
to the primary school period ; second, school subjects as vitalized by free and self- 
directed activities. 

Texts: Each student should be provided with one of the following: Gesell, The 
Normal Child and Primary Education (Ginn) ; Dewey, The Child and the Curricu- 
lum (Univ. of Chicago Press). .....; 



Courses of Instruction 17 

33. The Teaching of Reading in the Primary Grades. Miss 

Brown. C 10.30 G 312 

This course includes a study of the hygiene, psychology, and methods of teaching 
reading and its allied branches in the first three grades. 

34. The Teaching of Literature in the Primary Grades. Miss 

Brown. C 12.30 G 314 

This course offers a study of the problems of teaching literature in the primary 
grades, including types of material such as folk-lore, myth, legend, fable, modern 
stories, rhymes, poems, ballads, and their sources. 

35. Rural School Problems. Mr. Unger. C 9.30 G 311 

In this course the rural school, both as a social and an educational problem, and 
the data available for its solution are considered. Among the topics discussed are: 
buildings and equipment; recreation and playgrounds; rural hygiene; texts; lesson 
assignments and preparation; study; seatwork ; lesson plans; the daily program; 
the alternation schedule; standard tests. 

This consideration of the teaching of the elementary school subjects is conducted 
with reference to the Maryland Elementary Course of Study, and is designed, along 
with Education 23, to meet the minimum preparation for teaching specified in the 
State law. 

Texts: Rapeer and others, The Teaching of Elementary School Subjects (Scrib- 
ner's) ; Wilkinson, Rural Schools (Silver, Burdette & Co.). 

36. Physical Education: Principles and Practice, Dr. Burdick. 

and Miss Flinn. C 1.30 M 101 

This course is planned for those principals and teachers who desire their pupils 
to be happy children with healthy bodies. Half of the course is devoted to lectures 
on the nature of play, recreation, and athletics, their relation to general education, 
and the value of games for school discipline. The other half of the course consists 
of demonstrations of the principles discussed by means of games and athletics with 
the pupils of the Demonstration School. 

Readings: Gulick, A Philosophy of Play (Scribner's) ; Lee, Play in Education 
(Macmillan) ; Johnson, Education by Plays and Games (Ginn). 

37. Physical Education: Games and Athletics. Miss Flinn. 

C 2.30-4.20 M 101 

This course aims to prepare teachers to become actual leaders in the plays and 
games of children, and in the athletics of boys and girls. Supervised play ; organ- 
ized recesses ; school-room games ; after-school athletics. 

Each student will personally practice plays, games, and athletics. Simple gym- 
nasium suits will be needed. 

Text: Bancroft, Games for the Home, School and Playground (Macmillan). 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Usage and Structure. Mr. Litz. C 12.30 G 312 

A review of the elements of grammar and the principles of punctuation, and a 
study of the structure of sentences, paragraphs, and whole compositions. 

Text: French, Usage, Structure, and Style, Part 1 (Johns Hopkins Press). 

2. Advanced English Composition. Professor Routh. C 10.30 

O 311 

(This course is identical with Journalism 1). 

3. Oral English. Mr. Litz. C 8.30 C 120 

A study of the fundamentals of public speaking and the speech for various 
occasions, together with frequent practice in writing and delivering short talks. 
Text: Knapp and French, The Speech for Special Occasions (Macmillan). 



18 Summer Courses 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Types of English Poetry. Professor Routh. G and C 8.30 

G 113 

A study of the theory of verse, based upon the usage and experimentation of 
poets from Chaucer to the present day. Problems arising in the teaching of 
poetry will receive consideration. 

2. Shakespeare. Mr. Litz. C '9.30 G 312 

A study of King Lear, The Merchant of Venice, and Henry IV, Part 1. 
Texts: Arden Series, King Lear, The Merchant of Venice, and King Henry IV, 
Part 1 (Heath) ; Dowden, Shakespeare Primer (American Book Co.). 

3. American Prose. Professor Routh. € 12.30 G 113 

An historical study with special reference to the development of style and 
points of technique. Special attention is given to American authors and writings 
most used in English courses in secondary schools. 

Text: Carpenter, American Prose (Macmillan). 

Note. — This course is approximately the second half of the course on American 
Literature, the first half of which was given in 1920. 

FINE ARTS 

Instruction in Fine Arts will be offered by the Maryland Institute 
of Baltimore, Lanvale Street and Mount Royal Avenue, June 27 to 
August 5. (For separate circular, address Director of the Institute.) 

iStudents matriculated as candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
may offer these courses for credit. Such credit will be allowed only 
for the satisfactory completion of double-period courses. 

FRENCH 

1. Rousseau. Assistant Professor Havens. G and C 8.30 G 205 

This course is intended for students who have considerable facility in reading 
French. The minimum of preparation for entrance is the work outlined in 
Course 2. Lectures in French, collateral reading, reports in French. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Rousseau, Petits chefs-d'oeuvre (Didot) ; Nouvelle Helo'ise (Gamier) ; 
Emile (Garnier) ; Confessions (Didot). 

2. Practical French. Assistant Professor Havens. C 11.30 

G 205 

This course is intended for students who have adequate preparation in French 
4 and 5, or their equivalent. The exercises in the class are conducted in French. 

Texts: Bazin, Les Cberle (Holt) ; Hugo, Les Miserables (Holt) ; Giese and Cool, 
French Anecdotes (Heath) ; Levi, French Composition (Holt). 

3. French Phonetics. Assistant Professor Havens. C 12.30 

G 205 

This course is intended for students who have adequate preparation in French 
Elements and who wish to perfect their pronunciation. It is especially recom- 
mended to those planning to teach French. 

Text: Nitze and Wilkins, Handbook of French Phonetics (Holt). 



Courses of Instruction 19 

4. Intermediate French. Mr. Merrill. C 9.30 G 205 

This course presupposes the completion of French Elements or its equivalent, 
and includes a review of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, prac- 
tice in easy composition, and the reading of a book of short stories. 

Texts: Carnahan, Short French Review Grammar (Heath) ; Buffum, Stories' from 
Merimee (Holt). 

5. Elementary French. Mr. Merrill. C 10.30 G 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
consists of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, compo- 
sition, and the use of a conversational reader. 

Texts: The New Fraser and Squair French Grammar, 1921 (Heath) ; Bierman 
and Frank, Conversational French Reader (Allyn and Bacon). 

Note. — In case of sufficient demand, an evening course in Intermediate French 
or Practical French will be formed. All interested in such an evening class should 
file their preliminary registration before July 2. 



GEOGEAPHY 

1. Physiographic Geography: Map Making and Map Interpre- 

tation. Dr. Little. C 11.30 C 105 

This course presents the basic values of map making and map interpretation in 
physiographic geography. Maps in general; map making; kinds of projection; 
various types of maps; reading and possible uses of contour maps; weather maps; 
weather forecasting and its variety of uses. The physiographic provinces of the 
United States are considered and the part they played in influencing the history 
of the country is emphasized. 

Text: Salisbury, Physiography, Advanced course (Holt). 

2. Industrial and Commercial Geography. Dr. Little. C 9.30 

C 105 

This course presents the intimate relations between geography, industry, and 
commerce. Types of climate and their causes; chief industries: plant, animal, 
manufacturing, and mineral, with emphasis on the general principles underlying 
each; trade: its necessity, routes, and controlling factors. Attention is given to 
the available literature most helpful in teaching these subjects. 

Text: Smith, Industrial and Commercial Geography (Holt). 



GERMAN 

1. Advanced German. Associate Professor Roulston. G and C 

10.30 G 8 

Readings from Goethe. 

Texts: Die Leiden des jungen Werthers, ed. Feise (Oxford) ; Goethe's Poems, 
ed. Goebel (Holt) ; Iphigenie auf Tauris, ed. Allen (Ginn). 

2. Intermediate German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 9.30 

G 8 

Texts : Droste-Ht'ilshoff, Die Judenbuche, ed. Eckelmann (Oxford) ; Keller, 
Romeo und Julia auf dem Dorfe, ed. Corwin (Holt) ; Meyer, Gustav Adolfs Page, 
ed. Roulston (Holt). 

3. Elementary German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 8.30 

G 8 

A thorough review of the grammar is given. This course especially meets the 
needs of those who wish such a review while following more advanced courses. 
Text: Vos, Essentials of German (Holt). 



20 Summer Courses 



HISTOKY 

1. American Colonial History, 1690-1763. Associate Professor 

Bond. G 11.30 G 305 

An advanced course for graduate students, including lectures and seminary 
reports. The chief topics to be considered will be the development of British 
colonial policy and of local institutions, the gradual westward expansion of the 
seaboard colonies, and the struggle between the French and the English for the 
possession of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys. 

2. England and Greater Britain since 1815. Associate Profes- 

sor Bond. G and C 10.30 G 305 

A survey of the general development of the British Empire since 1815, with 
special emphasis upon economic, political and social changes in England, and 
upon problems of the Empire and of foreign policy. 

Texts: 'Cheyney, An Introduction to the Industrial and Social History of Eng- 
land, revised ed., 1920 (Macmillan) ; Cross, History of England and Greater 
Britain (Macmillan). 

3. American History since 1789. Associate Professor Bond. C 

8.30 G 305 

A course in American political, social, and economic development from the 
establishment of the Constitution. Special emphasis is laid upon American pro- 
gress since the Civil War, upon the relation of the United States to the Great 
War, and upon its present international position. 

Texts: The Riverside History of the United States; Vol. II, Johnson, Union and 
Democracy ; Vol. Ill, Dodd, Expansion and Conflict; Vol. IV, Paxson, The New 
Nation (Houghton Mifflin). 

4. Koman History. Dr. Baker. C 9.30 G 108 

A study of the growth and development of Rome, with attention to economic, 
social, and political aspects. 

Texts: Boak, A History of Rome to 565 A. D. (Macmillan) ; Munro, A Source 
Book of Roman History (Heath). 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Materials and Methods in Domestic Science. Miss Zuill. 

C (8.30 M 114 

This course is planned to meet the needs of teachers of domestic science in 
junior and senior high schools. 

The course includes: a study of present day policies in home economics; aims 
and objectives in home economics and the relation of domestic science to the 
whole field of home economics; the place of home economics studies in the ele- 
mentary school, junior high school, and senior high school curriculum; a study 
of the content of domestic science courses; planning courses of study for junior 
and senior high schools in given communities; methods of instruction; plans, 
factors involved in planning; standards for judging instruction; a study of text 
books, reference books, illustrative material and equipment. 

2. Materials and Methods in Domestic Art. Miss Zuill. C 

10.30 M 114 

This course is planned to meet the needs of elementary, junior high, and senior 
high school teachers of domestic art. 

The course includes: a general survey of the field of home economics; the 
relation of domestic art to other phases of home economics; the aims and objec- 
tives in domestic art in elementary schools, in junior high schools and in senior 
high schools; the place of domestic art in the elementary, junior high, and senior 
high school; planning courses of study in domestic art for a public school sys- 
tem; outlining content of courses for given communities; methods of instruction; 
lesson plans; a study of text books, and reference books for teachers and pupils, 
illustrative material, and methods of securing class room supplies. 



Courses of Instruction 21 



JOURNALISM 

1. Advanced English Composition. Professor Routh. C 10.30 

G 311 

This course provides special practice in writing, with applied theory. The 
work will be so planned as to co-operate with Course 2. It may, however, be 
taken separately. 

2. The Principles and Practice of Journalism. Mr. Tompkins. 

C 11.30 G 311 

This course of lectures on journalism and practical exercises in newspaper 
work includes discussions of the journalistic style, news stories, the reporter and 
his work, the departments of a modern newspaper, and the technical processes of 
publication. 

The course is given in co-operation with The Sun, Baltimore. Members of the 
class will have the opportunity to study the making of a newspaper in practice, 
to use the plant of The Sun as a laboratory for such study, and to write under the 
direction and criticism of a member of its editorial staff. 

Three scholarships have been provided by The Sun to be awarded to students 
taking Journalism 1 and 2 and any other related course. Applications, with 
detailed statements of training and experience, should be filed with the Director 
prior to Friday, July 1. 



MANUAL TRAINING 

1. Bench Work in Wood. Mr. Gaither. C 8.30-10.20 B PI 102 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper 
grades of the elementary schools and in the junior high school, outlining courses, 
planning equipments, end methods of individual and class exercises. 

Advanced work in both hard and soft woods, and instruction in the use of the 
following machines is included: grinders, speed lathes, band saw, circular saw, 
and planer. 

Teachers of shop work in junior high schools will find this course most helpful. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 

Note. — Previous training in this work is not required for admission to this 
course. 

2. Mechanical Drawing. Mr. Gaither. C 10.30 B P I 205 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of teachers of mechanical 
drawing in junior high schools, manual training and vocational schools. 

Emphasis is placed on the functional value of mechanical drawing to related 
subjects. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. Students will provide their own drawing instruments. 

3. Sheet Metal Work. Mr. Pettit. C 9.30-11.20 B P I 202 

This course includes instruction in the use of the ordinary materials and 
machines usually found in sheet metal shops, elementary soldering, laying out 
of pipe elbows, pails, and small articles. The principles of elementary sheet 
metal drafting, and working from the student's own drawing are a part of this 
course. 

Laboratory fee. $3.00. 

4. Wood Pattern Making. Mr. Pettit. C 8.30 B P I 101 

This course includes the making of simple patterns in wood; lectures and 
demonstrations on moulding and actual casting with material that can be used 
in any manual training shop. The use of wood-working machines and wood 
turning is included. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 



22 Summer Courses 

5. Electrical Work. Mr. Link. C 8.30-10.20 B P I 132 

A study of the practical applications of magnetism, electrostatics, electric 
currents, electromagnetism, and electromagnetic induction, with some attention to 
the underlying principles. Experiments are used freely to show the operation 
of various types of electrical equipment, such as batteries, telephones, telegraph, 
motors, generators, electric meters, transformers, radio telegraphy, and telephony. 

Note. — Courses 3, 4, and 5 deal with the knowledge and practice necessary 
for teachers in junior high or vocational schools, and will be given only if a 
sufficient number register in these courses. 

In arranging their schedule, students will note that the courses in Manual Train- 
ing, with the exception of Course 6, will be given at the Polytechnic Institute, 
North Avenue and Calvert Street. 

6. Elementary Manual Training. Mr. Gaither. C 11.30 

M 204 

This course includes handwork processes in cardboard, weaving, raffia, sand 
table work, bookbinding, metal and toy making, suitable for the grades of the 
elementary school. It presents an organized series of projects in each of the 
foregoing materials, emphasizing courses, equipments, supplies, and methods of 
handling the work. Special attention is given to materials and projects suitable 
for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders will find this 
course especially adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing Courses 1 and 6 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore city schools, pro- 
vided they are graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements to 
the secondary schools of Baltimore. 



MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Mathematics. Associate Professor Murnaghan. 

O 10.30 G 2 

Introduction to the theory and application of elliptic functions. A slight fami- 
liarity with the theory of the complex variable is prerequisite. 

2. Advanced Algebra. Associate Professor Murnaghan. C 11.30 

G 2 

Determinants; solution of the cubic and quartic equations; bilinear and quad- 
ratic forms. 

Text: B6cher, Introduction to Higher Algebra (Macmillan). 

3. Analytic Geometry. Associate Professor Murnaghan. C 

12.30 G 2 

Trilinear coordinates; quadratic loci. 

Note. — In case of sufficient demand, an introductory course in differential and 
integral calculus will be substituted for Course 3. 

MUSIC 

1. Public School Music: Primary Grades. Mr. Denues. C 
10.30 C 120 

This course is intended for those who have had no special training in public 
school music methods, and covers the work of the first three grades. Care and 
development of the child, voice; treatment of monotones; ear training; music 
writing; rote songs; motion songs; sight-singing; time and tone problems. 

Text: Hollis Dann, Music Course: Manual for Teachers, Booh 1 (American 
Book Co.). 



Courses of Instruction 23 

2. /Public School Music : Intermediate and Junior High Grades. 
Mr. Denues. C 12.30 C 120 

This course is intended for elementary and junior high school teachers, prin- 
cipals, and supervisors who have had previous training in public school music 
methods. It offers the training necessary to give instruction in the subject from 
the fourth through the junior high school grades. All technical knowledge not 
essential to the requirements of sight-singing is eliminated. Care and develop- 
ment of the voice during childhood and adolescence; voice testing; ear training; 
music writing; song interpretation; part-singing; time and tone problems. 

Text: Hollis Dann, Music Course: Manual for Teachers, Book II (American 
Book Co.). 



The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, July 4 to August 13. Its program includes courses in 
Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello, Composition, Harmony, Form and Analysis, 
Interpretation, Piano Pedagogy, Theory, Ear Training, and Musical Literature. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science may offer for credit 
courses in music when officially reported by the Conservatory as having been satis- 
factorily completed, in accordance with the plan of co-operation between the 
University and the Conservatory. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 



PHILOSOPHY 

1. /Social Ethics: The Ideal Community. Dr. Thalheimer. C 

11.30 G 113 

A criticism of present institutions and current morality from the point of view 
of the community that should be. 

2. The Relation Between Mind and Body. Dr. Thalheimer. C 

9.30 G 113 

A discussion of recent theories concerning the independence and efficacy of mind. 
Text: McDougall, Body and Mind (Methuen). 



POLITICS 

1. American National Government. Professor Debel. G and C 

11.30 G 320 

A survey course on the national government of the United States, including 
the historical development, structure, -and operation of the national government; 
the constitution; the rights and duties of citizens; the executive; Congress; and 
the judiciary. Some attention is also paid to party organization and issues. Ad- 
vanced students will do supplementary work. 

Text: Munro, Government of the United States (Macmillan). 

2. American State and Local Government. Professor Debel. G 

and C 12.30 G 320 

This course is complementary to Course 1, but may be taken independently. It 
includes a study of the relation of the state to the nation, state constitutions, 
the organization and functions of the various departments of state government; 
popular control through the initiative, referendum, and the recall; reorganization 
of the state administration and the introduction of the budget system. Attention 
is also paid to county, township, and city government, home rule, commission 
government, and the city manager plan. Advanced students will do supple- 
mentary work. 

Text: Munro, Government of the United States (Macmillan). 



24 Summer Courses 



PSYCHOLOGY 

1. [Modern Tendencies in Psychology. Dr. Bagby. G 11.30 

G 315 

This course will present a critical review of recent developments in psychology: 
behaviorism, Freudianism, and mental testing. 

2. The Personality of the School Child. Dr. Bagby. G and C 

9.30 G 320 

In this course a study will be made of the more important factors in the 
development of personality in childhood. The chief personality- types will be 
described with suggestions as to how each can best be controlled for educational 
purposes. 

3. Introductory Psychology. Dr. Bagby. C 8.30 G 320 

The fundamental conceptions of psychology will be presented with an emphasis 
on experimental methods and results. 

(SPANISH 

1. Spanish Literature. Mr. Robles. G and C 10.30 G 103 

By lectures in Spanish and readings a rapid survey of nineteenth century 
Spanish literature is undertaken. Advanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts: Fitzmaurice-Kelley, Spanish Literature (Appleton) ; Carrere, La voz de la 
Conseja (Zabala et IMaurin). 

2. Practical Spanish. Mr. Robles. C 8.30 G 103 

Spanish is the language of the classroom. The course includes conversational 
practice and regular exercises in prose composition. The course is also designed 
to meet the needs of teachers of Spanish in secondary schools, attention being 
given to the purpose, material, and methods of this instruction. A knowledge of 
Elementary Spanish is prerequisite. 

Texts: Romera-Navarro, America Espanola (Holt) ; Moreno-Lacalle, Elementos 
de Espanol (Sanborn). 

3. Elementary Spanish. Mr. Merrill. C 12.30 G 103 

Grammar, reading, composition, with special stress on pronunciation and oral 
exercises. 

Texts: Crawford, First Book in Spanish (iMacmillan) ; Allen and Castillo, 
Spanish Life (Holt). 



SCHEDULE 



S/S 0—9.20 
Education 4 
Education 7 
Education 16 
Education 23 
Education 30 
Education "31 
English Composition 
English Literature 1 
French 1 
German 3 
History 3 
Home Economics 1 
Manual Training 1 
Manual Training 4 
Manual Training 5 
Psychology 3 
Spanish 2 

0.30 — 10.20 
Biology 1 
Economics 2 
Education 3 
Education 8 
Education 13 
Education 17 
Education 27 
Education 35 
English Literature 2 
French 4 
Geography 2 
German 2 
History 4 

Manual Training 1 
Manual Training 3 
Manual Training 5 
Philosophy 2 
Psychology 2 



10—11.50 

Chemistry 1 

10.30 — 11.20 
Economics 1 
Education 6 
Education 15 
Education 19 
Education 26 
Education 38 
English Composition 2 
French 5 
German 1 
History 2 
Home Economics 2 
Journalism 1 
Manual Training 2 



(8.30 — 10.20) 
(8.30 — 10.20) 



(continued) 
(9.30 — 11.20) 
(continued) 



Manual Training 3 (continued) 
Mathematics 1 
Music 1 
Spanish 1 

11.30 — 12.20 

Classical Literature 
Education 2 
Education 10 
Education 14 
Education 22 
Education 24 
Education 32 
French 2 
Geography 1 
History 1 
Journalism 2 
Manual Training 6 
Mathematics 2 
Philosophy 1 
Politics 1 
Psychology 1 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Chemistry 4 
Economics 3 
Education 1 
Education 5 
Education 20 
Education 21 A and B 
Education 28 
Education 34 
English Composition 1 
English Literature 3 
French 3 
Mathematics 3 
Music 2 
Politics 2 
Spanish 3 

1.30 — 2.20 
Education 9 
Education 11 
Education 12 
Education 18 
Education 25 
Education 29 
Education 36 

2.30 — 4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Education 37 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 412 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS, AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degree A. B. 
(Open to Men) 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Degrees B. Eng. and S. B. in Chem. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S.B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Degrees D. P.H., S. D. and S.B.inHyg. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B., and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS AND SOCIAL 

ECONOMICS, AND IN ENGINEERING 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



% 

7 IV 



eries, 1922 Whole Number 336 

No. 2 

THE 



JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY CIRCULAR 



SUMMER COURSES 

JULY 5 -AUGUST 12 
1922 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Published by the University 

Issued January, March, April, June, July, October, November 



MARCH, 1922 



Entered, October 21, 1903, at Baltimore, Md M as second claw matter, 
Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 

Acceptance for mailing at apecial Tate of portage provided for in Section 1108, 
Act of October 3, 1917. Authorized on July 8, 1918 



CALENDAR, 1922 



June 13, Tuesday — Commencement Bay. 



June 26^Tuly 3. I 9 a ' m ' *? 4 P' "-J**?* Registration, 
* f Gilman Hall, Homewood. 

July 4, Tuesday — Independence Day. University "buildings closed. 
July 5, Wednesday — 8.30 a. m., Instruction in the Summer Courses 



July 8, Saturday — Classes meet as usual. 
August 12, Saturday — Close of Summer Courses. 



October 3, Tuesday — Forty-seventh regular session begins. 

October 9, Monday — College Courses for Teachers, fourteenth year 
begins. 

October 10, Tuesday — Night Courses for Technical Workers, seventh 
year begins. 

October 16, Monday — (Night Courses in Business Economics, seventh 
year begins. 



All work will begin promptly on Wednesday morning, July 5, 
according to the schedule on page 3 of cover. It is important that 
students should reach Baltimore in time to be present at the opening 
exercise of each course which they intend to pursue. 

g^" Registration should be made prior to July 5. It 
may be made, in advance, by mail prior to June 28; 
after this date in person only {see page 7) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER COURSES 
1922 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D. 
President of the University 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. 

Director of the Summer Courses 

David E. Weglein, Ph. D. 
Assistant to the Director 

Thomas R. Ball 
Registrar 

W. Graham Boyce 

Treasurer 



INSTRUCTORS 

Florence E. Bamberger, Ph. D. Education 

Associate Professor of Education. 

Leslie C. Beard, Jr., A. B. Chemistry 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Fowler D. Brooks, Ph. D. Education 

Associate in Education. 

Edward F. Buchner, Ph. D. Education 

Director; Professor of Education. 

William Burdick, M. D. Education 

Director, Public Athletic League, Baltimore. 

Oliver P. Chitwood, Ph. D. History 

Professor of History, West Virginia University. 

Rheinart P. Cowles, Ph.D. Biology 

Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Daniel da Cruz, Ph. D. Spanish 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, Miami University. 

John J. Davis, B. S. French 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, University of North Carolina. 



Summer Courses 



[534 



Niels H. Debel, Ph. D. 

Professor of Political Science, Goucher College 

John Denues. 

Supervisor of Music, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Carleton E. Douglass, A. M. 

Assistant Superintendent, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Agnes M. Flinn. 

Leader of Public Athletic League, Baltimore. 

Laura A. Frazee. 

Assistant Superintendent, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Allen W. Freeman, M. D. 

Resident Lecturer in Public Health Administration 



Political Science 

Public School Music 

Education 

Education 

Education 

School Hygiene 

English 



John C. French, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of English. 

George M. Gaither. Manual and Industrial Arts 

Supervisor of Industrial Education, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

J. Elliott Gilpin, Ph. D. Chemistry 

Collegiate Professor of Chemistry. 

Albert L. Hammond, A. B. Philosophy 

Instructor in Philosophy, College Courses for Teachers. 

Howard F. Hart, A. M. Education 

Head of Department of Mathematics, Montclair High School. N. J. 

Jesse W. Hubbard, A. M. Education and Geography 

Professor of Geography, State Normal School, Worcester, Mass. 
Schachne Isaacs, A. M. Psychology 

Instructor in Psychology. 

Charles W. Lemmi, A. M. Italian 

Assistant Professor of French and Italian, Goucher College. 

John W. Lewis, A. B. Education 

Director of Americanization, Public Schools, Baltimore. 

Eugene B. Link. Manual and Industrial Arts 

Instructor in Electricity, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 

Francis E. A. Litz, Ph. D. English 

Instructor in English. 

Sarah Meseroll, B. S. Education 

Supervisor of Grades, Public Schools, Cortland, N. Y. 
John R. Musselman, Ph.D. Mathematics 

Associate in Mathematics. 
John B. Opdycke, A. M. Education 

Chairman of the English Department, Theodore Roosevelt High School, 
New York City. 

Charles A. Pettit. Manual and Industrial Arts 

Instructor in Carpentry and Pattern Shop, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. 



535] Instructors 



Lawrence M. Kiddle, A. M. French 

Instructor in French. 

Robert B. Roulston, Ph. D. German 

Associate Professor of German. 

James E. Routh, Ph. D. English 

Lanier Professor of English, Oglethorpe University. 

Ray K. Savage, A. M. Education 

Principal, Jefferson Junior High School, Rochester, N. Y. 

I. Jewell Simpson, A. B. Education 

Assistant Director, Bureau of Educational Measurements, State Department 
of Education, Md. 

Frank T. Stockton, Ph. D. Economics 

Professor of Economics, University of South Dakota. 

James Sullivan, Ph. D. Education 

State Historian and Director of Archives and History, The University of 
the State of New York. 

Raymond S. Tompkins, LL. B. Journalism 

Editorial Staff of The Sun, Baltimore, Md. 

Maurice S. H. Unger, A. M. Education 

Superintendent of Schools, Carroll County, Md. 
David E. Weglein, Ph. D. Education 

Associate in Education; Assistant Superintendent of Public Schools, Balti- 
more. 

Frances Zutll, A. M. Home Economics 

Supervisor of Home Economics, Public Schools, Baltimore. 



DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

M. Rose Patterson, Principal C 118 

Junior High Grades 



Grace C. Fairbank 
N. Annette Mann, B. S. 
Eleanor C. Heavey 
Virginia Shaffer 
Alice G. Bucher 



Mary A. Adams 
Mary L. Broening 
Isabella M. Johnstone 
To be selected 
To be selected 
Maud M. Horn 



Grace Mink 
To be selected 



Mathematics 


C 215 


English 


C 214 


Foreign Languages 


C 117 


History- 


C 115 


Science and Geography 


C 114 


EMENTARY GRADES 




Grade VI 


M 201 


Grade V 


M 202 


Grade IV 


M 206 


Grade III 


M 121 


Grade II 


M 117 


Grade I 


M 119 


Kindergarten 




Kindergarten 


M 109 


Kindergarten Assistant 


M 109 



Summer Courses [536 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The twelfth year of the Summer Courses of the Johns Hopkins 
University will open on Wednesday, July 5, and continue until 
Saturday, August 12, inclusive. Exercises in each subject will be 
held every week-day, Monday to Friday. In addition, on Saturdays, 
July 8 and August 12, exercises will be held as scheduled. Each 
course will consist of thirty class exercises or their equivalent. In 
the sciences laboratory work will be additional. Examinations will 
be held at the close of the session. 

As the summer courses are authorized by the Trustees and their 
credits fixed by the various Faculties, they are an integral part of 
the work of the University. All the resources of the institution 
essential to their conduct are placed at the disposal of the students. 

The principal object of the University in making provision for the 
summer work is to furnish instruction to teachers in all grades of 
schools, and to other persons who seek opportunities for instruction, 
with or without reference to an academic degree. Some courses 
offered are designed to meet the needs of graduate and collegiate 
students who wish to advance their standing or to make up defi- 
ciencies. Also courses in some subjects not given in the regular 
session are offered to meet special needs of schools. 

CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses maintain the standard of instruction which character- 
izes the work of the regular session in the subjects representing 
graduate and collegiate departments, as well as in those introduced 
to meet the special needs of teachers. In addition to the regular 
class exercises, instructors hold daily conferences, in which the work 
of the courses is supplemented and adapted to the particular needs 
of individuals. 

DEMONSTRATION AND OBSERVATION SCHOOLS 

In co-operation with the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners, 
a demonstration elementary and junior high school will be conducted 
as a means of affording illustrative material for the courses in edu- 
cation. This school will comprise two sections: one, an elementary 
department, consisting of a kindergarten and grades one to six, 
inclusive; the other, a junior high department, providing instruction 
in important subjects in grades seven, eight and nine. This will be 



537] Geneva] Statement 5 

one of the city vacation schools in which pupils will be given an 
opportunity to secure promotion at the beginning of the next school 
year. Children whose parents are residents of Baltimore will be 
permitted to attend this school free of all charges for tuition and 
material of instruction. 

Other city elementary and secondary vacation schools will be open 
during the session and available for observation in connection with 
the courses in elementary and secondary education. 

SELECTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for advanced degrees should arrange their programs 
in consultation with the departments in which their principal sub- 
jects lie. New students expecting to become candidates should pre 
sent their cases to the Director. 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree should consult with the 
College Dean or the Director prior to the opening of the session, in 
the selection of courses that will meet requirements for the degree. 

Students seeking credit that will enable them to meet in part or 
in full the requirements of state and city certificates, should select 
their academic and professional courses in accordance with the 
regulations in force under the Board of Education or of Examiners 
to whorn their record will be submitted for acceptance. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT 

Graduate courses, leading to the degree of Master of Arts, will be 
credited by the respective departments in accordance with this rule 
of the Board of University Studies: the requirement of one of the 
two years of residence for this degree may be met by attendance and 
study in three sessions of the Summer Courses. These courses are 
designated by G. 

Students matriculated as candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
will receive credit for the satisfactory completion of those courses 
designated by C. In general the same credit is given per hour 
as in the regular college courses, e. g., a lecture course of thirty 
hours has a credit of two "points," or one-third of the credit for a 
course of three hours per week through the college year. Provided, 
however, the student follows but two courses, an additional credit 
may be given. The exact amount of additional credit in each course 
is determined by the instructor according to the work accomplished, 
subject to the approval of the Director, but in no case will an addi- 
tional credit to exceed fifty per cent, be given, nor can a total credit 



G Summer Courses [538 

of more than eight points be allowed a student in one summer 
session. 

Students not matriculated in the University will receive certifi- 
cates indicating the amount of work satisfactorily performed. These 
certificates will indicate the value of the work done in each course, 
and will be accepted by State, County, and City Superintendents an<] 
Boards of Examiners in the extension or renewal of teachers' certifi- 
cates, according to law. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission. Students, both 
men and women, will be admitted to such courses as they are found 
qualified by the respective instructors to pursue with advantage. 

The session will open promptly on July 5, carrying out the 
schedule provided on page 3 of cover. The Registrar's office (219 
Gilman Hall) will be open for registration daily from Monday, June 
26 to Monday, July 3, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. After July 6, 
admission to each course will be restricted to registered students. 
With the consent of the Director, students may make changes in 
their courses, which must be reported in person to the Registrar, 
up to and including July 7. After this date no change of courses 
will be permitted. 

All fees, including both tuition and special laboratory and deposit 
fees, must be paid to the Treasurer immediately as an item in 
registration. Attention is called to the fee of $3.00 for the privilege 
of registration after July 5. 

NEW LOCATION 

The University is occupying its new buildings at Homewood, a 
tract of one hundred and twenty acres in the northern part of 
Baltimore, where the session will be held. Entrances are on North 
Charles street at 32d and 34th streets. Footpath entrances are 
through Wyman Park, which lies on the southern and western sides 
of the grounds. 

Homewood is reached from Camden Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
the St. Paul Street trolley line cars marked " Guilford-Union 
Station"; from the Mount Royal Station (B. & 0. Railroad) by 
walking two blocks east to Charles street; and from Union Station 
(Pa., N. C, and W. M. Railroads) by the trolley line on Charles 
street, marked "Roland Park" or "Guilford-Union Station"; and 
also by the north-bound blue motor-bus on Charles street. One 
should alight at 32d or at 34th street. 



539] General Statement 



EXPENSES 

The regular tuition fee is $35.00, payment of which entitles the 
student to attend as many as three courses. An additional course, 
with the exceptions noted in the statements of certain courses, may 
be attended, with the approval of the Director, upon the payment 
of an extra fee of $14.00. (Under very exceptional circumstances, a 
student may register in one course only, the tuition fee in such 
case being $22, unless otherwise noted in the statement of any par- 
ticular course.) 

The tuition fee for officers and teachers employed in public schools 
in the counties of Maryland, as evidenced by superintendent's cer- 
tificates, is $18.00, payment of which entitles such persons to register 
in two or three courses. Students failing to attend regularly the 
courses in which they have registered will be subject to the payment 
of the full fee. 

Failure to register and pay tuition and laboratory fees before the 
close of July 5 will entail an additional fee of $3.00. 

Registration and payment of fees should be made in person or by 
mail in advance of the opening of the session. Students desiring 
to register by mail will first receive from the Director's office, upon 
request, a registration card, which is to be returned accompanied 
by remittance of the exact amount of tuition and other charges. 
Registrations by mail will be received up to and including June 28; 
after this date in person only at the University. 

Additional fees are required for materials used in some of the 
courses. (For details, see statements of courses.) 

No reduction of fees will be allowed for withdrawal after July 6th. 

Checks will be received in payment of fees when drawn to the 
order of the Johns Hopkins University. For the convenience of 
students while in residence at the University, the Treasurer will 
receive out-of-town checks and drafts for payment upon collection. 
There is no charge for this service. 

BOARD AND LODGING 

Board will be furnished at the Johns Hopkins Club, located in the 
Carroll Mansion on the campus. Men and women in attendance are 
eligible for summer membership, the fee being $2.00. This fee is 
payable by all who are not regular members of the Club. Member- 
ship cards are issued by the Director upon registration at the Uni- 
versity. The Club will open with dinner, Tuesday, July 4, and 
close with dinner, Saturday, August 12.. Board is furnished at $9.00 
per week. Luncheons are served singly at 50 cents. The dairy lunch 



8 Summer Courses [540 

room in the Student Activities Building will be open daily during 
the session. 

The University has no dormitories. Furnished rooms in private 
homes in the vicinity of the University are offered for rent at prices 
ranging from $3.00 to $7.00 per week for a single room. Beard can 
be had in private boarding-houses or in public restaurants at prices 
ranging from $7.00 to $12.00 per week. A printed list of boarding 
and lodging houses will be sent upon request. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

In addition to the social opportunities afforded by the opening 
and closing receptions, students are invited to the lectures and 
recitals which will be given every Wednesday afternoon and Friday 
evening, in co-operation with the Summer Session of the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 

excursions 
Saturday excursions will be made to Annapolis, the State capital, 
and Washington. D. C, both within an hour's ride by trolley, and to 
points of interest in and about Baltimore. 

the university post-office and book-store 

The University post-office, in Gilman Hall, will be open. Students 
may have their mail addressed in care of Johns Hopkins University. 

The Johns Hopkins Press Book-'Store (102 Gilman Hall) supplies 
officers and students with text books, stationery, and other materials 
at list prices. The book-store will be open daily. 

bureau of appointments 

The University Bureau of Appointments extends its services gratis 
to the students registered in the Summer Courses. These services 
include assistance in placing students in academic and non-academic 
positions. The Director, Dr. French, will be found in his office (303 
Oilman Hall) during the session. 

SUMMER WORK FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

Beginning Thursday, June 1st, and ending. Saturday, July 15th, 
a course in medical diagnosis, including laboratory exercises in 
clinical pathology and demonstrations in pathological anatomy, will 
be offered. The course will be limited to thirty students, fee $100. 
Applications should be made to the Dean of the Medical School of 
the University. 



541] Courses of Instruction 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Explanation of Symbols in Titles op Courses. 

C and G preceding the hour indicate that the course may be offered for colle- 
giate and graduate credit, respectively. 

The final initial and number indicate the building and classroom: G, Gilman 
Hall; C. Civil Engineering; M, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering; ' B. P. I., 
Baltimore Polytechnic" Institute. 



BIOLOGY 

1. General Biology. Associate Professor Cowles and Assistant. 

C 9.30 G 11 

The course is open to all students without previous training in science. Study 
and comparison, with the aid of the microscope, of typical organisms from the 
simpler, as amoeba and yeast, to the more complex. The lectures deal with the 
manner in which plants and animals carry on their activities, and point out our 
present interpretations and biological theories. 

Texts: Abbott, General Biology (Macmillan) ; Andrews, Laboratory Directions in 
General Biology and Embryology (Johns Hopkins Press). 

2. Zoology. Associate Professor Cowles and Assistant. C 12.30 

G 11 

The laboratory work of this course consists of a study of such representative 
animals as amoeba, hydra, an earthworm, a crayfish, and a frog. The behavior of 
these animals as well as their structure is studied, including occasional field 
excursions to streams, forests, and open fields, for the purpose of becoming better 
acquainted with the habitats of animals. The lectures supplement, for the most 
part, the work in the laboratory, but a few lectures are devoted to the more 
general problems of zoological science. 

Texts : Hegner, College Zoology (Macmillan) ; Pratt, Invertebrate Zoology 
(Ginn). 

Laboratory fee: $1.50, for each course. 

CHEMISTRY 

1. Organic Chemistry. Professor Gilpin and Mr. Beard. G 

10-10.50 and 11-11.50; Laboratory, 12.30-4.20 M 204 

This course is intended for those who have had a thorough training in inorganic 
chemistry and will be suited to the needs of graduate students who have not had 
a systematic course in organic chemistry, and also to those who wish to prepare 
for entrance to the Medical School or to the School of Hygiene. In order to 
satisfy the requirements of these schools, the course will consist of two hours 
lectures and four hours laboratory work daily. 

Texts: Remsen, Organic Chemistry (Heath) ; Norris, Laboratory Manual of 
Organic Chemistry (McGraw Hill Book Co.). 

Laboratory fee: $12.00; denosit fee: $5.00. 

Note. — In the arrangement of programs and determination of fees, students 
should note that Chemistry 1 is a double course. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. Mr. Beard. G and C 10-10.50 M., 

W, F.; Laboratory, 10-4.20 M 116 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in qualitative analysis. Laboratory is open from 10 
a. m. to 4.20 p. m. 

Laboratory fee: $7.00; deposit fee: $5.00. 



10 Summer Courses [542 

3. Quantitative Analysis. Mr. Beard. G and C 10-10.50 

Tu., Th., Laboratory, 10-4.20 M 116 

For those who have had sufficient preparation, opportunity will be offered for 
individual laboratory work in quantitative analysis. Laboratory is open from 10 
a. m, to 4.20 p. m. 

Laboratory fee: $7.00; deposit fee: $5.00. 

4. Introduction to General Chemistry. Professor Gilpin and 

Mr. Beard. O 12.30; Laboratory, 2.30-4.20 M 104 

No previous knowledge of chemistry is required for this course. It will include, 
as far as possible in the time allowed, a study of the important non-metallic and 
metallic elements and their properties. 

Text : McPherson and Henderson, A Course in General Chemistry with labora- 
tory manual (Ginn). 

Laboratory fee: $7.00; deposit fee: $5.00. 

Note. — The deposit fee of $5 for each course will be returned at the close 
of. the session less the cost of materials not included in the laboratory fee and 
the charge for breakage. 

ECONOMICS 

1. The Labor Movement. Professor Stockton. G and C 10.30 

G 315 

The development of labor organizations; policies and parties in America; 
socialism and agrarian movements in their relation to labor problems. Advanced 
students will do supplementary work. 

2. American Economic History. Professor Stockton. C 9.30 

G 315 

The main currents of America's economic development, such as manufacture, 
commerce, industrial organization, transportation, currency, banking, agriculture, 
population and labor, historically considered in their bearing on the life of the 
people. 

Text: Van Metre, Economic History of the United States (Holt). 

3. Elements of Political Economy. Professor Stockton. C 

12.30 G 315 

A general survey of the science of economics, including production, consumption, 
exchange, and distribution. 

Text: Ely, Outlines of Economics (Macmillan). 

EDUCATION 

1. Experimental Education: The Application of Statistical 

Methods to Education. Dr. Brooks. G 9.30 G 216 

This course aims to equip advanced students, principals, and superintendents of 
schools for careful, accurate investigation of problems in education. Principles 
and techniques fundamental (a) to scientific experimentation in education and 
(b) to the presentation and interpretation of educational data. Practice in the 
necessary statistical and graphical procedures. 

2. Experimental Education: The Intelligence of School Chil- 

dren. Dr. Brooks. G 8.30 G 216 

A. Principles and techniques of rating the intelligence of school children; the 
development, forms, and uses of intelligence tests, both individual and group; 
statistical evaluation and graphical presentation of data; interpretation and 
application of results with special reference to the classification and instruction 
of children. Provision is made for practice in giving and scoring tests. 



543] Courses of Instruction 11 

B. Students who satisfactorily completed the above (Education 4) in 1921, 
and others with equivalent training, will have the opportunity of doing advanced 
work on special problems to be assigned. 

Texts: Terman, The Measurement of Intelligence (Houghton Mifflin); Twenty- 
first Yearbook, Parts I and II (Public School Publishing Co.). 

3. Experimental Education: Tests in the Elementary School 

Subjects. Miss Simpson. G and C 11.30 G 216 

A. A critical studv of the standardized scales and the group survey method of 
testing the achievements of pupils in elementary school subjects. Attention is 
given to the evaluation of tests and the graphical presentation of data. Pro- 
vision is made for practice in giving and scoring tests. 

B. Students who satisfactorily completed the above (Education 3) in 1921, and 
others with equivalent training, will have the opportunity of doing advanced work 
on special problems to be assigned. 

Three lectures and four hours laboratory work per week. 

4. Experimental Education: Interpretation and Application 

of Test Kesults. Miss Simpson. G and C 9.30 G 320 

The use of tests for improvement of classroom instruction; interpretation of 
the statistical data; diagnosis of pupil ability and pupil difficulties; corrective 
measures. The course aims to present pupil measurement as a direct means of 
devising effective procedures and methods for teaching the elementary school 
subjects. 

5. Educational Psychology: Elementary School Subjects. 

Dr. Brooks. G and C 10.30 G 216 

Analysis of the learning processes with special reference to reading and arith- 
metic, some attention being given to handwriting, drawing, spelling, and the 
social studies. Considerable attention is given to the diagnosis and remedial 
treatment of reading defects. 

Texts: Thorndike, Psychology of Arithmetic (Macmillan); Smith, The Reading 
Process (Macmillan). 

6. School Hygiene. Dr. Freeman. G and C 8.30 G 320 

The course is designed to give a general view of the subject of hygiene as it 
relates to the school child. Methods of teaching hygiene in the curriculum are 
presented for discussion, and the development and use of charts, models and 
other aids to teaching are employed. 

This course is given in cooperation with the School of Hygiene and Public 
Health, under the auspices of the Be Lamar Foundation for the Extension of 
Medical Knowledge. Be Lamar Scholarships have been made available for stu- 
dents registering in this course alone. Application should be made to the Bi- 
rector before July 1. 

Tuition fee: $5, for students registering in this course alone. 

Secondary Education 

7. Secondary Education. Dr. Weglein. G and C 10.30 G 310 

This course includes some of the principal topics in secondary education: the 
development and function of the American high school; the main problems con- 
nected with the program of studies; types of learning characteristic in secondary 
schools; methods of instruction. 

Text: Inglis, Principles of Secondary Education (Houghton Mifflin). 

8. The Teaching of English in the Senior HiGn School. Mr. 

Opdycke. G and C 11.30. G 310 

The work of this course embraces the various phases and departments of senior 
high school English teaching, including types and qualities of expression, and 
the focusing of instruction upon ultimate academic and community requirements. 
Stress is placed upon appreciation and enjoyment in the reading of classics and 
upon craftsmanship in oral and written composition. Some attention is given 
to the problems of departmental organization of instruction in English. 

Lectures, reports, lesson plans, and teaching tests. 



12 Summer Courses [544 

9. The Teaching of Mathematics in the Senior High School. 

Mr. Hart. G and C 9.30. G 2-3 

This course on the teaching; of senior high school mathematics includes the 
following topics: required and elective courses in grades ten, eleven, and twelve; 
ninth grade mathematics in four-year high schools; recommendations of the 
National Committee; the new entrance requirements for admission to college; 
applied mathematics; training in the pure mathematics of these courses; the use 
of tests; statistics applied to teaching. 

Lectures and reports on assigned topics. 

Each student should have in hand: (1) the texts to be used in his school: 
(2) a historv of mathematics; (3) a text on the teaching of mathematics in 
secondary schools. 

10. The Teaching of History and Civics in the Senior High 

'School. Dr. Sullivan. G and C 8.30. G 311 

A. brief historical survey of the introduction of history and civics courses in 
the high school course of study, and an analysis of the various committee reports 
for their improvement in content, methods of teaching and correlation with 
courses in the elementary school, junior high school and college, is followed by 
a. detailed study of the practical methods to be used in the presentation of the 
subjects in the class room. 

Observation work in the city schools and practice teaching in sections will be 
given. Special readings and reports will be called for. 

11. The Teaching of Geography in Secondary Schools. Pro- 

fessor Hubbard. G and C 12.30 C 105 

This course on the teaching of geography in the junior high school emphasizes 
the application of the project-problem method in this subject. It! includes: 
selection and motivation; development of problems; class organization for this 
type of work; regional geography, its meaning and value, bases for dividing the 
continents into natural regions; a study of specific regions to show the unity of 
economic response in a uniform physical environment; conduct of field trips; 
geographical changes made in the continents affected by the peace treaties; 
methods of teaching topics in mathematical geography. 

Text: Branom, The Teaching of Geography (Ginn). 

12. Problems of Organization and Administration in the 

Junior High School. Mr. Savage. G and C 10.30 G 320 

After a consideration of the historv of education in America and of the demands 
for a reorganization of the school system, different features of organization and 
administration are discussed. Such subjects as preparation of teachers, curricula, 
courses of studv and schedule making are considered and careful attention is 
given to the problems of adolescence, vocational guidance and industrial training. 

Text: Briggs, The Junior High School (Houghton Mifflin). 

13. Methods of Teaching in the Junior High School. Mr. 

Savage. G and C 8.30 G 315 

This course treats such topics* as supervised study, promotion by subject, 
study coach organization, socialized recitation, project and problem method, 
extra-curricula activities, socializing the school, and student government. Special 
methods of teaching the various subjects are considered. Assigned reading, class 
papers and discussions. 

14. The Teaching of English in the Junior High School. Mr. 

Opdycke. G and C 12.30 G 310 

The work of the course deals with the special problems of English teaching in 
the intermediate or junior high school, particularly in connection with literature, 
speech, composition, and the mechanics of expression. Content is examined and 
methodology indicated. The " middle place " of junior high school English is 
interpreted in relation to the elementary school below and to the senior high 
school above. 

Lectures, papers, discussion, and model lessons by the students. 



545] Courses of Instruction 13 

15. The Teaching of Mathematics in the Junior High School. 

Mr. Hart. G and C 11.30 G 2-3 

This course considers the selection, organization, and teaching of topics in 
mathematics for grades seven, eight, and nine. Special consideration is given to: 
the local course of study; the recommendations of the National Committee; 
training in the actual mathematics of these courses, especially intuitional geo- 
metry, indirect measurement, ti'igonometry, and statistics; the measurement of 
intelligence and progress. 

Lectures and reports on assigned topics. 

Each student should have in hand: (1) a modern text for these grades; (2) 
a copy of the report of the National Committee; (3) Hanus, Geometry in the 
Grammar School (Heath); Stone, The Teaching of Arithmetic (Sanborn). 

16. The Teaching of History and Civics in the Junior High 

School. Dr. Sullivan. G and C 9.30 G 305 

An historical survey similar to that given in the course for the senior high 
school (see Education 10) is followed by a consideration of the courses of 
study in history and civics peculiarly fitted for the junior high school as differ- 
entiated from the elementary and the senior high school, and of the methods to 
be used in the presentation of the subjects in the class room. 

Observation of school room work and practice teaching in sections will be 
given. Special readings and reports will be called for. 

17 A. Demonstration School: Junior High Grades. Professor 
Buchner and Dr. Weglein. G and C 12.30 M 114 

Demonstration lessons in many of the subjects taught in grades seven, eight, 
and nine. A description of the requirements for credit for this course is given 
in Education 17 B. 

The conferences, 12.30 p. m., will begin Wednesday, July 5, and the observa- 
tion of teaching, Thursday, July 6. 

Note. — For additional courses presenting material on teaching secondary 
school subjects see: English Literature 1, 2, and 3; Home Economics; Manual 
and Industrial Arts; Music 3. 

Elementary Education 

17 B. Demonstration School: Elementary Grades. Professor 
Buchner and Dr. Weglein. C 12.30 M 110 

The purpose of this course is to furnish a practical study of the teaching 
process by means of systematic observation, conferences, and reports. The school 
will be in session daily from 8.30 a. m. to 12.20 p. m. These classes are open 
for observation only to those registered for this course. The elementary depart- 
ment will include a kindergarten and grades one, two, three, four, five, and six. 

The requirement for those taking the course for credit (one point) is a total of 
six conferences (12.30 p. m.), twenty-four observation hours, and two written 
reports. The two written reports must be filed in the office of the Director, 217 
Oilman Hall, not later than Monday, August 8. Reports filed after this date will 
not be accepted. 

The conferences, 12.30 p. m., will begin Wednesday, July 5, and the observation 
of teaching, Thursday, July 6. 

18. Supervision in Elementary Schools. Associate Professor 
Bamberger. G 8.30 G 312 

This course is designed for principals, supervisors, and critic teachers. It is 
organized about the principle that growth of teachers in service is the outcome 
of scientific supervision, and considers the four chief phases: supervision of subject 
matter; supervision of instruction; personal supervision; measuring the results 
of supervision. Such topics as the following are discussed: the responsibility of 
the supervisor for securing community support and cooperation for progressive 
educational policies; the nature and value of systematic report cards and blanks; 



14 Summer Courses [546 

standards for evaluating the worth of courses of study; of text-books; of daily 
programs of children's activities; of the various types of schoolroom procedure 
such as the drill lesson, the supervised study lesson, the project-method, the 
so-called socialized recitation. It also considers the personal relationship of 
supervisor and supervised, and standards for evaluating the worth of supervisory 
activities. 

19. The Organization and Supervision of City Elementary 

Schools. Mr. Douglass. G and C 11.30 G 312 

A. This course considers the principal as a supervisor, and as a social and an 
educational agent. The chief topics are: the making of courses of study; 
classification and promotion of pupils; departmental teaching; types of supervision; 
school statistics; extra-classroom activities; health; play; relation of school to 
home and community. 

B. Advanced students who satisfactorily completed the above (Education 22) 
in 1921, and others with equivalent training, will have the opportunity of doing 
additional work in special problems to be assigned. 

20. School Management and School Law. Mr. Unger. G and 

C 9.30. G 310 

A. This course is designed to meet the needs of teachers who wish to qualify 
as princiDals, to improve principals in service, and to give teacher and principal 
a perspective of a properly organized school in a county system. It includes a con- 
sideration of the Report on the Cardinal Principles of Secondary Education, the 
six-three-three plan of school organization, the elements of curricula-making, the 
consideration of a well-balanced daily and weekly program, the supervision of 
the school, measuring the achievements of children and a study of teachers' 
marks, attendance and retardation, discipline and punishment, extra-curricular 
activities, the health of the school-child, school administration, and the princi- 
pal's responsibility under the Maryland School Law. 

B. Advanced students who satisfactorily completed the above (Education 23) 
in 1921, and others with equivalent training, will have the opportunity of doing 
additional work in special problems to be assigned. 

Texts: Finney and Schaffer, Administration of Village and Consolidated Schools 
(Macmillan); Strayer and Englehart, The Classroom Teacher (American Book Co.). 

21. Teaching the Elementary School Subjects. Mr. Douglass. 

C 10.30 G 312 

This course in method and content of the intermediate and grammar grades 
offers a critical survev of existing conditions with reference to the social demands 
made upon the school. 

Lectures, readings, and discussions. 

Text: Rapeer, Teaching Elementary School Subjects (Scribner's). 

22. Heading in the Intermediate Grades. Associate Professor 

Bamberger. O 11.30 G 311 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those who wish to obtain knowl- 
edge of the recent tendencies in the teaching of reading to children in the ele- 
mentary school above the third grade. The treatment is organized about the 
principal issues in teaching reading, such as: oral vs. silent reading; reading for 
meaning; fiction vs. factual material; how to get adequate motives; the supervised 
studv lesson in reading; reading in relation to the project method; the measure- 
ment of silent and oral reading. 

Members of the class will be expected to apply reading tests to the children 
in the demonstration school. The results of these will furnish the material for the 
discussion on measurement of reading. 

23. The Teaching of Geography in the Intermediate Grades. 

Professor Hubbard. C 8.30 C 105 

Home geography, including the content and method of observational work and 
the relation of home geography to upper grade work; field trips for observational 



547] Courses of Instruction 15 

study; use of the text book, illustrative material, maps, and readers; selection 
and organization of subject matter; methods of teaching the geography of pro- 
ducts and industries using North America as a type of the continents. 

Text: Dodge and Kirchwey, Teaching of Geography in Elementary Schools 
(Rand, McNally and Co.). 

24. Pupil Participation in the Activities of the Primary 

Grades. Miss Frazee. C 12.30 G 112 

This course comprises a study of: social and educational principles underlying 
project activity; school life as a field for training in initiative and co-operation; 
the adjustment of pupil participation to the standards of the curriculum; the 
adaptation of classroom organization and equipment to more free and varied 
activity on the part of pupils, and the wider opportunity which the socialized 
school opens to teachers and principals. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and class discussions. 

Texts: Kilpatrick, The Project Method (Teachers Coll. Press); Dewey, Interest 
and Effort in Education (Houghton Mifflin). 

25. Selection and Arrangement of Curriculum Materials for 

the Primary Grades. Miss Frazee. C 10.30 G 112 

This course undertakes a study of the principles in accordance with which 
curriculum materials are selected and graded and an examination and evaluation 
of the materials of the curriculum for grades one, two, and three, in the light 
of these principles. 

Lectures, readings, and class discussions. 

Texts: Bonser, The Elementary School Curriculum (Macmillan) ; Dewey, The 
Child and the Curriculum (Univ. of Chicago Press). 

26. Literature and Reading in the Primary Grades. Associate 

Professor Bamberger. C 9.30 G 112 

This course offers a critical study of the place that literature and reading 
occupy in the educative process of children from five to eight years of age. The 
topics to be considered are : the physical, social, and psychological needs of the 
young primary child; types of literature that meet these needs; the psychology 
of reading; the pre-book reading stage; the purpose and conduct of silent reading; 
the purpose and conduct of oral reading; the purpose and technique of measuring 
reading ability. 

Members of the class will be expected to apply reading tests to the children 
in the demonstration school. The results of these will furnish the material for 
the discussion on measurement of reading. 

27. First Grade-Kindergarten Adjustments. Miss Meseroll. 

C 11.30 G 112 

The course considers the experiences and activities of children, the various 
materials of instruction available in kindergarten and first grade, methods of 
presentation, and recent typical courses of study, with special reference to the 
adjustments now possible between kindergarten and first grade. 

This course is open to teachers in first grade, kindergarten, and to prospective 
teachers in kindergarten, and is designed to offer such training as will permit 
an interchange in their assignments. 

28. Current Kindergarten Theory and Practice. Miss Mese- 

roll. C 8.30 G 112 

This course deals with problems of the kindergarten and includes a discussion 
of the aims, subject-matter and methods of different types of schools in this 
country and abroad which have demonstrated more satisfactory procedure in 
handling the problems of the kindergarten. Attention is given to the organiza- 
tion of the activities of children and to the selection and use of appropriate 
materials for fine, industrial, and dramatic arts. 

Open to teachers in first grade, kindergarten, and prospective teachers in 
kindergarten. 



16 Summer Courses [548 

29. Rural and Village School Problems. Mr. Unger. C 8.30 

G 310 

In this course the rural and village school, both as a social and an educational 
problem, and the data available for its solution are considered. Among the 
topics discussed are: buildings and equipment; recreation and playgrounds; rural 
hygiene; text-books; lesson assignments and preparation; study; seatwork, lesson 
plans; the daily program; the alternation schedule; standard tests. 

Note. — The consideration of the teaching of the elementary school subjects is 
conducted with reference to the Maryland Elementary Course of Study, and is 
designed, along with Education 20, to meet the minimum preparation for teaching 
specified in the State law. 

Texts: Hart, Educational Resources of Village and Rural Communities (Mac- 
millan); Davis, The Technique of Teaching (Macmillan). 

30. Problems of Americanization: Principles, Problems and 

Backgrounds. Mr. Lewis. G 8.30 G 313 

This course offers a study of the various problems of adjustment of the foreign- 
born; the immigrant's relation to his community; principles and methods of 
Americanization work; immigrant backgrounds as they affect immigrant preju- 
dices and attitudes of mind; the co-ordination of Americanization forces and 
agencies in the community. 

Note. — See note under Education 31. 

31. Problems of Americanization: Methods of Teaching Eng- 

lish to Foreign-Born. Mr. Lewis. C 9.30 G 313 

This course is planned for persons interested in teaching English to the foreign- 
born in evening schools, in women's classes, or to non-English-speaking children 
in the grades. The course includes a study of the direct method of teaching 
language; practical class room methods in evening schools; courses of study. 

Opportunity will be given for observation of evening classes conducted by the 
Department of Education of Baltimore City. 

Note. — Persons desiring to qualify as teachers of English to the foreign-born 
should register for Education 30 and 31. 

Tuition fee: $15.00 for students registering in both Education 30 and 31. 

32. Physical Education: Principles and Practice. Dr. Burdick 

and Miss Flinn. C 1.30 M 101 

This course is planned for those principals and teachers who desire their pupils 
to be happy children with healthy bodies. Half of the course is devoted to lectures 
on the nature of play, recreation, and athletics, their relation to general education, 
and the value of games for school discipline. The other half of the course consists 
of demonstrations of the principles discussed by means of games and athletics with 
the pupils of the Demonstration School. 

Readings: Gulick, A Philosophy of Play (Scribner's) ; Lee, Play in Education 
(Macmillan) ; Johnson, Education by Plays and Games (Ginn). 

33. Physical Education: Games and Athletics. Miss Flinn. 

C 2.30-4.20 M 101 

This course aims to prepare teachers to become actual leaders in the plays and 
games of children, and in the athletics of boys and girls. Supervised play ; organ- 
ized recesses ; school-room games ; after-school athletics. 

Each student will personally practice plays, games, and athletics. Simple gym- 
nasium suits will be needed. 

Text: Bancroft, Games for the Home, School and Playground (Macmillan). 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

1. Style and the Forms of Discourse. Dr. Litz. C 12.30 

G 311 

A study of the elements of style and of the principles of description, narra- 
tion, exposition, and argumentation, with frequent practice in writing. 



549] Courses of Instruction 17 

Text: French, Usage, Structure, and Style, Part II (Johns Hopkins Press). 
Note. — This course is the second half of the regular course in English Compo- 
sition, the first half of which was given in 1921. 

2. The Short Story. Professor Rotjth. C 9.30 G 113 

A study of the technique of the short story, with practice in writing. The 
text and readings in the library are used to supply models for the construction of 
original stories. 

Text: Ramsay, Short Stories of America (Houghton Mifflin). 

3. Oral English. Associate Professor French. C 10.30 G 311 

A course in the composition and delivery of speeches adapted to various special 
occasions. Attention is paid to correct habits of expression and to the ready 
choice of words. 

Text: Knapp and French, The Speech for Special Occasions (Macmillan). 

4. The Forms of Contemporary Prose Writing. Dr. Litz. C 

10.30 G 314 

(This course is identical with Journalism 1). 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

1. Shakespeare. Professor Rotjth. G and C 10.30 G 10S 

An intensive study of Hamlet, Macbeth, and As You Like It, with reference to 
sources, versification, dramatic technique, and literary values, together with dis- 
cussion of methods for teaching appreciation of Shakespeare. 

Text : Hamlet, Macbeth, and As You Like It, ed. Verity in The Student's Shake- 
speare (Univ. Press, Cambridge, Eng.). 

2. Tennyson: Idylls of the King. Professor Rotjth. G and C 

8.30 G 113 

Versification, the use of sources and the art of telling a story in verse, as 
illustrated by Tennyson's twelve idylls, all treated with some reference to the 
needs of the secondary teacher of literature. 

3. American Verse. Associate Professor French. C 9.30 G 311 

A survey of the various types of verse represented in American literature, 
including the works of contemporary poets. Emphasis is laid on the poems 
common!}- studied in secondary schools. 

Text: Pattee, Century Readings in American Literature (Century Co.). 

Note. — The full course in American literature in the regular session, of which 
this is approximately the first half, may be completed in the second half-year of 
the College Courses for Teachers. 

4. History of English Literature: 1600-1750. Dr. Litz. C 

8.30 G 314 

This course offers a survey of the literature of the seventeenth and the first half 
of the eighteenth centuries. Special attention is given to the English Bible, 
Milton, Dryden, and Pope. 

Text: Century Readings in English Literature, ed. Cunliffe, Pyre and Young 
(Century Co.). 

Note. — The second half of the usual historical course in English literature 
from 1600 to 1890, of which Course 4 is approximately the first half, may be 
expected in the summer program of 1923. 



18 Summer Courses [550 



FINE ARTS 

Instruction in Fine Arts will be offered by the Maryland Institute 
of Baltimore, Lanvale Street and Mount Royal Avenue, June 27 to 
August 8. (For separate circular, address Director of the Institute.) 

Students matriculated as candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science may offer for credit such of these courses as come within 
the regulations governing the academic relations of the University 
and the Institute. 

In the program of the Institute the following course is announced: 
Industrial Art for Teachers, by T. H. Pond, three hours daily. 

FRENCH 

1. iCorneille. Mr. Riddle. G and C 8.30 G 205 

A study of Corneille's dramatic theory and practice in his tragedies from the 
Cid to Nicomede.. This course is intended for students who have considerable 
facility in reading French. Lectures and reports in French. Advanced students 
will do supplementary work. 

Text: Corneille, Theatre choisi (Hachette). 

2. French Romanticism. Mr. Riddle. G and C 10.30 G 205 

A study of the characteristics of French Romantic literature. This course is 
open to those who have a reading knowledge of French. Advanced students will 
do supplementary work. 

Texts: Chateaubriand, Atala (Heath); Henning, Representative French Lyrics 
of the Nineteenth Century (Ginn) ; Hugo, Hernani (Heath) ; Musset, Trois Come- 
dies (Heath). 

3. French Phonetics. Mr. Riddle. G and C 12.30 G 205 

A study of modern French pronunciation. Open to students who have a read- 
ing knowledge of French. 

Texts: Nyrop, Manuel phonetique du francais parle; Tilly, Aid to French 
Pronunciation (Macmillan). 

4. Practical French. Assistant Professor Davis. C 9.30 

G 205 

This course in intended for students who have adequate preparation in French 
5 and 6, or their equivalent. The exercises are conducted in French. 

Texts: Daniels, Contes de la France contemporaine (Heath); Balzac, Eugenie 
Grandet (Holt). 

5. Intermediate French. Assistant Professor Davis., C 8.30 

G 108 

This course presupposes the completion of French Elements or its equivalent, 
and includes a review of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, practice 
in easy composition, and the reading of a novel. 

Texts: Carnahan, Short French Review Grammar (Heath); France, Le Crime 
de Sylvestre Bonnard (Heath). 

6. Elementary French. Assistant Professor Davis. C 11.30 

G 205 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of French. The work 
consists of a study of the essentials of grammar, drill in pronunciation, com- 
position, and the use of a conversational reader. 

Texts: The New Fraser and Squair French Grammar, 1921 (Heath); Bierman 
and Frank, Conversational French Reader (Allyn and Bacon). 






51] Courses of Instruction 19 



GEOGRAPHY 

Industrial and Commercial Geography. Professor Hubbard. C 
11.30 C 105 

A study of the physical environment of productive regions showing how climate, 
soil and relief of surface determine the distribution of the world's products; the 
relation of manufacturing to the location of raw materials and fuel ; conservation 
of natural resources; factors which determine the location and character of trade 
routes including the influence of harbors upon railway transportation and the 
growth of cities, with special reference to Baltimore. 

Text: Smith, Industrial and Commercial Geography (Holt). 

GERMAN 

1. Advanced German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 10.30 

G 103 

Advanced prose composition. 

Text: Whitney and Stroebe, Advanced German Composition (Holt). 

2. Intermediate German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 

9.30 G 103 

Texts: Meyer, Das Amulett, ed. Glascock (American Book Co.); Keller, Die 
drei gerechten Kammacher, ed. Collins (Heath) ; Goethe, The Vicar of Sesenheim, 
ed. Nichols (Holt). 

3. Elementary German. Associate Professor Roulston. C 8.30 

G 103 

A thorough review of the grammar is given. This course especially meets the 
needs of those who wish such a review while following more advanced courses. 

HISTORY 

1. American Colonial History, 1689-1776. Professor Chitwood. 

G 11.30 G 305 

An advanced course for graduate students including lectures and seminary 
reports. Particular attention is given to colonial industry and commerce, the 
British regulations of commerce and industry, social life, and governmental 
institutions. 

2. European History since 1815. Professor Chitwood. G and C 

10.30 G 305 

A survey of the history of Europe from 1815 to 1870 is followed by an intensive 
study of the subsequent period, with special emphasis upon economic conditions, 
international rivalries, and the diplomatic background, the immediate causes, and 
the economic aspects of the great war. 

Text: Schapiro, Modern and Contemporary European History (Houghton Mifflin). 

3. American History since 1825. Professor Chitwood. C 8.30 

G 305 

This survey course on the second half of American history includes a study of 
social and economic life as well as political development, emphasis being laid 
upon the period from 1825 to 1860. 

Texts: The Riverside History of the United States; Vol. Ill, Dodd, Expansion 
and Conflict; Vol. IV, Paxson, The New Nation (Houghton Mifflin). 



20 Summer Courses [552 

HOME ECONOMICS 

1. Materials and Methods in Home Economics. Miss Zuill. 

C 8.30 G 9 

This course is planned to meet the needs of elementary, junior high, and senior 
high school teachers of home economics. It is open to students who completed 
Home Economics 1 and 2 in 1921 or have equivalent training. 

The course includes: a study of the aims and objectives of home economics in 
the elementary, junior high, and senior high school; the present tendencies in 
this field of work; the content of the various home economics courses; planning 
courses of study, with especial attention to home problems, such as household 
management, household decoration and furnishing, personal finances, family 
budgets and home care of the sick; methods of presenting these home problems 
in public school classes; selection of subject material for various units of work; 
group versus individual instruction in practical work; and analysis of text book 
and reference material in the new phases of work. 

2. Textiles and Clothing. Miss Zuill. € 9.30-11.20 G 9 

This course is planned to meet the needs of elementary, junior high, and senior 
high school teachers of domestic art. 

The course includes: a survey of the field of home economics and the place 
of a course in textiles and clothing in the whole field of home economics; textile 
fibres and the fundamental principles of textile manufacture; textiles and clothing 
from, the standpoint of art, economics, and hygiene; the relation of textiles to 
the household furnishings; simple tests for textiles; principles of laundering 
various textiles and care of textiles; clothing from the standpoint of construction 
processes; methods of presenting the study of textiles in the. public schools; 
available text-book and reference material on clothing and textiles. 

Students are required to make concrete and practical applications of the 
principles discussed on selected problems. 

Laboratory fee: $1.50. 

ITALIAN 

1. Italian Literature. Assistant Professor Lemmi. C 11.30 

G 10 

This course offers a study of nineteenth century Italian fiction. In case of 
sufficient demand, another period or type of literature will be substituted. 

2. Practical Italian. Assistant Professor Lemmi. C 8.30 G 10 

The course includes reading in Italian fiction, conversational practice, and prose 
composition. Italian is the language of the classroom. 

Texts : Farina, Fra le corde d'un contrabasso, ed. Schobinger and Preston 
(University of Chicago Press) ; Giacosa, Tristi amori, ed. Altrocchi and Wood- 
bridge (University of Chicago Press) ; Giacosa, Una partita a scacchi, ed. Phelps 
(University of Chicago Press). 

3. Elementary Italian. Assistant Professor Lemmi. C 9.30 

G 10 

This course is planned for students beginning the study of Italian. 
Texts : Phelps, An Italian Grammar (Ginn) ; Farina, Fra le corde d'un contra- 
basso, ed. Schobinger and Preston (University of Chicago Press). 

JOURNALISM 

1. The Forms of Contemporary Prose Writing. Dr. Litz. C 
10.30 G 314 

A study of the rhetorical principles involved in effective writing, as illustrated 
by the best contemporary journalism. The work of this course is planned to 
cooperate with Journalism 2. It may, however, be taken separately. 

Text: Cunliffe and Lomer, Writing of Today, revised edition (Century Co.). 



553] Courses of Instruction 21 

2. The Principles and Practice of Journalism. Mr. Tompkins. 
C 11.30 G 314 

This course of lectures on journalism and practical exercisesin newspaper 
work includes discussions of the journalistic style, news stories, the reporter and 
his work, the departments of a modern newspaper, and the technical processes of 
publication. 

The course is given in co-operation with The Sun, Baltimore. Members of the 
class will have the opportunity to study the making of a newspaper in practice, 
to use the plant of The Sun as a laboratory for such study, and to write under the 
direction and criticism of a member of its editorial staff. Towards the close of 
the session in 1921, The Sun issued " The Hot Times, vol. 1, no. 1," a miniature 
newspaper, which was produced as a laboratory exercise by the students in 
Journalism. This special feature of the course will be continued. 

Three scholarships have been provided by The Sun to be awarded to students 
taking Journalism 1 and 2 and any other related course. Applications, with 
detailed statements of training and experience, should be filed with the Director 
prior to Saturday. July 1. The awards will be made about July 17. 

MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

1. Bench Work in Wood. Mr. Gaither. C 8.30-10.20 B P I 102 

This course includes the use of tools and bench work in wood in the upper 
grades of the elementary schools and in the junior high school, outlining courses, 
planning equipments, and methods of individual and class exercises. 

Advanced work in both hard and soft woods, and instruction in the use of the 
following machines is included: grinders, speed lathes, band saw, circular saw, 
and planer. 

Teachers of shop work in junior high schools will find this course most helpful. 

Laboratory fee: $3.50. 

Note. — Previous training in this work is not required for admission to this 
course. 

2. Mechanical Drawing. Mr. Gaither. C 10.30 B P I 205 

This course is designed to meet the special needs of teachers of mechanical 
drawing in junior high schools, manual training and vocational schools. 

Emphasis is placed on the functional value of mechanical drawing to related 
subjects. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. Students will provide their own drawing instruments. 

3. Sheet Metal Work. Mr. Pettit. C 8.30-10.20 B P I 202 

This course includes instruction in the use of the ordinary materials and 
machines usually found in sheet metal shops, elementary soldering, laying out 
of pipe elbows, pails, and small articles. The principles of elementary sheet 
metal drafting, and working from the student's own drawing are a part of this 
course. 

Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

4. Advanced Sheet Metal Work. Mr. Pettit. C 8.30-10.20 

B P I 202 

Attention is given to more advanced projects such as pipe intersections, tee 
joints, elbows, cornice work, drawing elevations and plans; developing patterns 
and transferring to metal; parallel lines. 

Prerequisite : Course 3, or equivalent. 

Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

5. Wood Pattern Making. Mr. Pettit. C 10.30-12.20 B. P. I 

101. 

This course includes the making of simple patterns in wood; lectures and 
demonstrations on moulding and actual casting with material that can be used 



22 Summer Courses [554 

in any manual training shop. The use of wood-working machines and wood 
turning is included. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

6. Electrical Work. Mr. Link. O 9.30-11.20 B P I 132 

A study of the practical applications of magnetism, electrostatics, electric 
currents, electromagnetism, and electromagnetic induction, with some attention to 
the underlying principles. Experiments are used freely to show the operation 
of various types of electrical equipment, such as batteries, telephones, telegraph, 
motors, generators, electric meters, transformers, radio telegraphy, and telephony. 

Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

7. Advanced Electrical Work. Mr. Link. C 11.30-1.20. B. P. 

I. 101 

This course provides advanced exercises which will give training in constructing 
simple electrical appliances, wireless apparatus, wiring circuits, and a certain 
amount of experimental work with electrical measuring instruments, circuits, 
apparatus, and calculations. 

Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

Note. — Courses 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 deal with the knowledge and practice necessary 
for teachers in junior high or vocational schools, and will be given only if a 
sufficient number register in these courses. 

In arranging: their schedule, students will note that the courses in Manual and 
Industrial Arts, with the exception of Course 8, will be given at the Polytechnic 
Institute, North Avenue and Calvert Street. 

8. Elementary Manual Arts. Mr. Gaither. C 11.30 M 217 

This course includes handwork processes in cardboard, weaving, raffia, sand 
table work, bookbinding, metal and toy making, suitable for the grades of the 
elementary school. It presents an organized series of projects in each of the 
foregoing materials, emphasizing courses, equipments, supplies, and methods of 
handling the work. Special attention is given to materials and projects suitable 
for rural schools. 

Those desiring training as playground and recreation leaders . will find this 
course especially adapted to their needs. 

Laboratory fee: $3.00. 

Note. — Students satisfactorily completing Courses 1 and 8 will be eligible to 
take the examination for manual training teachers in Baltimore City schools; 
students satisfactorily completing Course 2 and any two selected from Courses 1 
(or 5), 3. and 6. will be eligible to take the practical part of the examination 
for manual arts teachers in the Baltimore junior high schools; provided they are 
graduates of secondary schools equal in entrance requirements to the secondary 
schools of Baltimore. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Mathematics. Dr. Musselman. G 11.30 G 8 

Introduction to the theory of correspondences including a study of linear trans- 
formations, quadratic forms and invariants. 

2. Advanced Algebra. Dr. Musselman. C 8.30 G 8 

Solution of equations; complex numbers; series. 

Text: Wilczynski and Slaught, College Algebra with Applications (Allyn and 
Bacon). 

3. Introduction to Calculus. Dr. Musselman. C 10.30 G 2-3, 

Text: Townsend and Goodenough, Essentials of Calculus (Holt). 
Note. — In case of sufficient demand, a course in analytic geometry will be 
substituted for Course 3. 



555] Courses of Instruction 23 



MUSIC 

1. Public School Music: Primary Grades. Mr. Denues. C 

9.30 C 120 

This course is intended for those who have no special training in public school 
music methods, and covers the work of the first three grades. Care and develop- 
ment of the child voice; treatment of monotones; ear training; music writing; 
rote songs; sight-singing; methods of presenting time and tone problems. 

Text: Hollis Dann, Music Course: First Year Music; Second Year Music; Third 
Year Music; Manual for Teachers, Book I (American Book Co.). 

2. Public School Music: Intermediate Grades. Mr. Denues. 

C 12.30 C 120 

This course is intended for teachers, principals and supervisors who have had 
previous training in public school music methods. It offers the training necessary 
to give instruction in the subject in the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. All 
technical knowledge not essential to the requirements of sight-singing is elimi- 
nated. Oare and development of the child voice; ear training; melodic invention; 
song interpretations; relational effects of the scale tones; part singing; time and 
tone problems. 

Text: Hollis Dann, Music Course: Fourth Year Music; Fifth Year Music; Sixth 
Year Music; Complete Manual for Teachers (American Book Co.). 

3. Public School Music: Junior and Senior High Schools. Mr. 

Denues. C 10.30 C 120 

This course for advanced students offers training necessary to give instruction 
in the subject in grades seven, eight, and nine (junior high school) and senior 
high school. Special topics include study of outlined courses covering subject 
matter to be presented; treatment of adolescent voices, testing voices, vocalization, 
part-singing, chorus conducting, song interpretation, music appreciation. 

Text: Hollis Dann, Music Course: Junior Songs; Complete Manual for Teachers 
(American Book Co.); Giddings and Newton, Junior Song and Chorus Book (Ginn). 



The Peabody Conservatory of Music of Baltimore is announcing its summer 
session of six weeks, July 3 to August 12. Its program includes courses in 
Singing, Piano, Organ, Violin, 'Cello, Composition, Harmony, Form and Analysis, 
Interpretation, Piano Pedagogy, Theory, Ear Training, and Musical Literature. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science may offer for credit 
courses in music when officially reported by the Conservatory as having been satis- 
factorily completed, in accordance with the plan of co-operation between the 
University and the Conservatory. 

Circulars containing full particulars will be sent on application to either the 
University or the Conservatory. 

PHILOSOPHY 

1. Ethics: General and Practical. Mr. Hammond. C 12.30 

G 113 

An inquiry into the relations of the problem of happiness to the fundamental 
ethical problems, and an examination and comparison of several programmatic 
doctrines as to morality and happiness. 

2. Contemporary American Philosophy. Mr. Hammond. C 10.30 

G 113 

A consideration of current thought from the two critical points of view devel- 
oped by William James and George Santayana. 



2tt Summer Courses [556 

POLITICS 

L American National Government. Professor Debel. G and C 
11.30 G 320 

A survey course on the national government of the United States, including 
the historical development, structure, and operation of the national government; 
the constitution; the rights and duties of citizens; the executive; Congress; and 
the judiciary. Some attention is also paid to party organization and issues. Ad- 
vanced students will do supplementary work. 

Texts : Munro, Government of the United States (Macmillan) ; Reinsch, Readings 
on American Federal Government (Ginn). 

2. American State and Local Government. Professor Debel. G 
and C 12.30 G 320 

This course is complementary to Course 1, but may be taken independently. It 
includes a study of the relation of the state to the nation, state constitutions, 
the organization and functions of the various departments of state government; 
popular control through the initiative, referendum, and the recall; reorganization 
of the state administration and the introduction of the budget system. Attention 
is also paid to county, township, and city government, home rule, commission 
government, and the city manager plan. Advanced students will do supple- 
mentary work. 

Texts : Munro, Government of the United States (Macmillan) ; Reinsch, Readings 
on American State Government (Ginn). 

PSYCHOLOGY 

1. The Psycho-physiology of Sleep and Dreams. Mr. Isaacs. 

G 9.30 G 401 

A consideration of the physiological and psychological characteristics of sleep 
and dreams and related phenomena, with critical examination of the theories 
proposed to explain them. 

2. Applied Psychology. Mr. Isaacs. G and C 11.30 G 401 

Applications of principles and technique of general and experimental psychology 
to problems of industrial efficiency, vocational guidance and selection, and per- 
sonal efficiency. 

Prerequisite: Course 3, or equivalent. 

3. Introductory Psychology. Mr. Isaacs. C 8.30 G 401 

The fundamental conceptions of psychology are presented with emphasis on 
experimental methods and results. 

SPANISH 

1. Spanish Literature. Dr. da Cruz. G and C 9.30 G 8 

Lectures in Spanish and reading in Don Quixote. Advanced students will do 
supplementary work. 

Texts: Ticknor, Don Quixote ( Apple ton ) ; Cool, Spanish Composition (Ginn). 

2. Practical Spanish. Dr. da Cruz. C 10.30 G 8 

Spanish is the langruasre of the classroom. The course includes conversational 
practice and regular exercises in prose composition. A knowledge of elementary 
Spanish is prerequisite. 

Texts: Jose Marmol, Amalia, ed. Corley (Macmillan); Tamayo, Lo Positivo, 
ed. Harry and De Salvio (Heath); Crawford, Spanish Composition (Holt). 

3. Elementary Spanish. Dr. da Cruz. C 12.30 G 8 

Grammar, reading, composition, with special stress on pronunciation and oral 
exercises. 

Texts: Crawford, First Book in Spanish (Macmillan); Hills, Spanish Tales for 
Beginners (Holt). 



SCHEDULE 



8.30—9.20 

Education 2 

Education 6 

Education 10 

Education 13 

Education 18 

Education 23 

Education 28 

Education 29 

Education 30 

English Literature 2 

English Literature 4 

French 1 

French 5 

German 3 

History 3 

Home Economics 1 

Italian 2 

Manual and Indust. Arts 1 (8.30 — 10.20) 

Manual and Indust. Arts 3 (8.30 — 10.20) 

Manual and Indust. Arts 4 (8.30 — 10.20) 

Mathematics 2 

Psychology 3 

9.30—10.20 
Biology 1 
Economics 2 
Education 1 
Education 4 
Education 9 
Education 16 
Education 20 
Education 26 
Education 31 
English Composition 2 
English Literature 3 
French 4 
German 2 

Home Economics 2 (9.30 — 11.20) 
Italian 3 

Manual and Indust. Arts 1 (continued) 
Manual and Indust. Arts 3 (continued) 
Manual and Indust. Arts 4 (continued) 
Manual and Indust. Arts 6 (9.30 — 11.20) 
Music 1 % 
Psychology 1 
Spanish 1 

10—10.50 

Chemistry 2, M., W., F. 
Chemistry 3, Tu., Th. 

10—11.50 

Chemistry 1 

10.30—11.20 
Economics 1 
Education 5 
Education 7 
Education 12 
Education 21 



Education 25 

English Composition 3 

English Composition 4 

English Literature 1 

French 2 

German 1 

History 2 

Home Economics 2 (continued) 

Journalism 1 

Manual and Indust. Arts 2 

Manual and Indust. Arts 5 (10.30 — 12.20) 

Manual and Indust. Arts 6 (continued) 

Mathematics 3 

Music 3 

Philosophy 2 

Spanish 2 

11.30—12.20 
Education 3 
Education 8 
Education 15 
Education 19 
Education 22 
Education 27 
French 6 
Geography 
History 1 
Italian 1 
Journalism 2 

Manual and Indust. Arts 5 (continued) 
Manual and Indust. Arts 7 (11.30 — 1.20) 
Manual and Indust. Arts 8 
Mathematics 1 
Politics 1 
Psychology 2 

12.30—1.20 
Biology 2 
Chemistry 4 
Economics 3 
Education 11 
Education 14 
Education 17 A 
Education 17 B 
Education 24 
English Composition 1 
French 3 

Manual and Indust. Arts 7 (continued) 
Music 2 
Philosophy 1 
Politics 2 
Spanish 3 

1.30—2.20 

Education 32 

2.30—4.20 

Biological Laboratory 
Chemical Laboratory 
Education 33 



Note.— Classes will meet regularly on Saturday, July 8. 






THE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY 

BALTIMORE 

Founded 1876 



A FACULTY OF 449 PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUC- 
TORS, AND LECTURERS 



SPECIAL LIBRARIES AND WELL-EQUIPPED 
LABORATORIES 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degrees A. M. and Ph. D. 
(Open to Men and Women) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Degree M. D. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degree A. B. 
(Open to Men) 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Degrees B. Eng. and S. B. in Chbm. 

(Open to Men) 



COLLEGE COURSES FOR TEACHERS 

Degree S. B. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SCHOOL OF HYGIENE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Degrees D.P.H., S.D. and S. B.inHtg. 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES 

With A. M., A. B., and S. B. Credits 

(Open to Men and Women) 



SUMMER COURSES FOR GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 



EVENING COURSES IN BUSINESS AND SOCIAL 

ECONOMICS, AND IN ENGINEERING 

(Open to Men and Women) 



THE JOHNS HOPKINS PRESS PUBLICATIONS 



STATE BUREAUS 

Maryland Geological Survey, Maryland Weather Service, 

Maryland Forestry Bureau 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




3 0112 111992878